Australian and World history

By 3th3
  • Australians first serve in the Boer War

    Australians first serve in the Boer War
    The Boer War Day commemorates the first war in which Australia fought as a nation. 10 October 1899 the NSW troops were the first to join in this war followed by all of the other colonies and after Federation in 1901 Australian units took part. The Boer War was also the first war in which Australians fought alongside New Zealanders.
  • Federation—Australia becomes a new nation

    Federation—Australia becomes a new nation
    In Centennial Park, Sydney by Lord Hopetoun, the first Governor General11. By this time the Australian people had embraced the idea and turned out in their thousands for celebrations all over the new nation. This included the opening of 'Federation Arches' in each state, such as the Commonwealth Arch, Park Street, Sydney
  • Centenary of Federation

    Centenary of Federation
    The Commonwealth of Australia was proclaimed on 1 January 1901 in Centennial Park, Sydney by Lord Hopetoun, the first Governor General11. By this time the Australian people had embraced the idea and turned out in their thousands for celebrations all over the new nation. This included the opening of 'Federation Arches' in each state, such as the Commonwealth Arch, Park Street, Sydney (pictured left).
  • End of Boer War

    End of Boer War
    The Boer War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Vereeniging in May 1902. The peace settlement brought to an end the Transvaal and the Orange Free State as Boer republics. However, the British granted the Boers £3 million for restocking and repairing farm lands and promised eventual self-government (granted in 1907).
  • First aeroplane flight, by the Wright brothers in the USA

    First aeroplane flight, by the Wright brothers in the USA
    Wilbur Wright had written a letter of request to the Smithsonian Institution for information about flight experiments, the Wright Brothers designed their first aircraft: a small, biplane glider flown as a kite to test their solution for controlling the craft by wing warping. Wing warping is a method of arching the wingtips slightly to control the aircraft's rolling motion and balance.
  • Titanic sinks

    Titanic sinks
    The Titanic collided with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton The sinking of Titanic caused the deaths of 1,514 people in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history. She was the largest ship afloat at the time of her maiden voyage. She carried 2,223 people.
  • Australia enters World War l

    Australia enters World War l
    Australia's early involvement in the Great War included the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force taking possession of German New Guinea and the neighbouring islands of the Bismarck Archipelago in Oct 1914.
    On 25 April 1915 members of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) landed at Gallipoli together with troops from New Zealand, Britain, and France. Following Gallipoli, Australian forces fought campaigns on the Western Front and in the Middle East.
  • Landing of Australian and other troops at Gallipoli

    Landing of Australian and other troops at Gallipoli
    On 25 April 1915 Australian and New Zealand troops landed at Gallipoli
  • Completion of transcontinental railway linking Brisbane to Perth

    Completion of transcontinental railway linking Brisbane to Perth
    Completion of Transcontinental Railway Linking Brisbane to Perth 17 Oct 1917
  • Influenza epidemic after World War I kills more people than war

    Influenza epidemic after World War I kills more people than war
    March 11th, 1918: The first cases of one of the worst influenza epidemic ( FLU )in history are reported at Fort Riley. What began as a simple case of flu in a military camp in Kansas, ultimately spread around the world to claim more lives that World War I, from 50 million to 100 million people according to estimates.
  • End of World War 1 - an estimated 12 million dead

    End of World War 1 - an estimated 12 million dead
    The human cost of World War I was enormous. More than 9 million soldiers and an estimated 12 million civilians died in the four-year-long conflict, which also left 21 million military men wounded.
  • Qantas starts flying planes in Australia

    Qantas starts flying planes in Australia
    Qantas emerged in the outback in 1920, as a necessity to get people, goods and mail across our dry continent which had few accessible roads. Its first aircraft was a biplane equipped to carry two passengers, no cabin, just the open cockpit. Later on, the new Australian airline helped operate the Flying Doctor Service set up by John Flynn in Alice Springs which offered medical care to people living in remote areas of the outback and emergency transport to hospitals for the sick or injured.
  • Start of the Great Depression

    Start of the Great Depression
    After nearly a decade of optimism and prosperity, the United States was thrown into despair on Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929, the day the stock market crashed and the official beginning of the Great Depression. The Great Depression, an immense tragedy that placed millions of Americans out of work, was the beginning of government involvement in the economy and in society as a whole, it ended in the early 1940s
  • Phar Lap Wins the Melbourne Cup

    Phar Lap Wins the Melbourne Cup
    PHAR Lap has re-affirmed his claim as the Australia’s greatest race horse after winning the Greatest Cup Never Run. The 1930 Cup winner won the prestigious race ahead of his bloodline relative Carbine (1890) and, Makybe Diva (2003, 2004, 2005). The race was a simulated race of a field of the Cup’s top 24 winners, with results worked out by a team of racing experts.
  • First Australian born governor general, sir Isaacs, appointed

    First Australian born governor general, sir Isaacs, appointed
    Sir Isaac Isaacs is appointed, 22 January 1931, Australia’s first native-born Governor-General, despite King George V’s opposition to a ‘local’ appointment. A former Member of Parliament for Bogong in the Victorian Legislative Assembly and a High Court Judge, Isaacs serves as Australia’s ninth Governor-General until 1936.
  • Opening of the Sydney Harbor Bridge

    Opening of the Sydney Harbor Bridge
    The Sydney Harbor Bridge was opened by Premier Jack Lang, after six years of construction. Made of steel the bridge contains 6 million hand driven rivets. The Bridge has huge hinges to absorb the expansion caused by the hot Sydney sun. You will see them on either side of the bridge at the footings of the Pylons
  • Last Tasmanian Tiger dies in captivity

    Last Tasmanian Tiger dies in captivity
    On 7 September 1936, the last known Tasmanian Tiger died at the Hobart Zoo. This was the first known species of animal to become extinct in Tasmania. So how did an animal that was so common just 100 years earlier, become extinct in such a short time? The answer, unfortunately, is humans. There is no evidence that Tasmanian Tiger still exists in the wild.
  • Australia enters World War ll

    Australia enters World War ll
    Australia entered World War II shortly after the invasion of Poland, declaring war on Germany on 3 September 1939.
  • Darwin is bombed for the first time during world war ll

    Darwin is bombed for the first time during world war ll
    The bombing of Darwin on 19 February 1942 was both the first and the largest single attack mounted by a foreign power against Australia. On this day, 242 Japanese aircraft attacked ships in Darwin's harbour and the town's two airfields in an attempt to prevent the Allies from using them as bases to contest the invasions of Timor and Java. The town was only lightly defended, and the Japanese inflicted heavy losses upon the Allied forces at little cost to themselves.
  • Japanese submarines raid in Sydney Harbour

    Japanese submarines raid in Sydney Harbour
    In the late afternoon of 31 May 1942 three Japanese submarines, I-22, I-24 and I-27, sitting about seven nautical miles (13 kilometres) out from Sydney Harbour, each launched a Type A midget submarine for an attack on shipping in Sydney Harbour. The night before, I-24 had launched a small floatplane that flew over the harbour, its crew spotting a prize target – an American heavy cruiser, the USS Chicago. The Japanese hoped to sink this warship and perhaps others anchored in the harbour.
  • Australian scientist Howard Florey discovers how to mass produce penicillin, thus saving millions of lives around the world

    Australian scientist Howard Florey discovers how to mass produce penicillin, thus saving millions of lives around the world
    Florey headed a team of British scientists that were on a journey to find a substance that could destroy bacteria with little or no side effects to the patient. They understood substances with this property were needed thanks to Louis Pasteur, who proved that invisible organisms called bacteria all around us, are the cause of many diseases. Amongst the substances they chose to study was a mold called penicillium, which had been found to have antibacterial properties.
  • Atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    The atomic bombs destroyed many Japanese cities, the Allies prepared for a costly invasion of Japan. Together with the United Kingdom and the Republic of China, the United States called for a surrender of Japan in the Potsdam Declaration on 26 July 1945, threatening Japan with "prompt and utter destruction". The Japanese government ignored this ultimatum, and two nuclear weapons little boy and fat man
  • End of World War II- an estimated 55 million dead

    End of World War II- an estimated 55 million dead
    World War II was the mightiest struggle humankind has ever seen. It killed more people, cost more money, damaged more property, affected more people, and caused more far-reaching changes in nearly every country than any other war in history. The number of people perished between 1939 and to when it ended August 8 1945 was estimated at more than 55 million.
  • First Australian involvement in United Nations peacekeeping, in Indonesia

    First Australian involvement in United Nations peacekeeping, in Indonesia
    Australia’s first peacekeeping operation commenced in Yogyakarta,Indonesia, 14 September 1947, which predated the first United Nations peacekeeping operation. Four Australian Military officers being the first world peacekeepers by deploying to the United Nations Good Offices Commission in Dutch East Indies (Indonesia).
  • The first mass-produced car in Australia, is completed

    The first mass-produced car in Australia, is completed
    On 29 November 1948, Prime Minister Ben Chifley unveiled the first Holden 48-2158, which became affectionately known as 'the FX9'.
    The price was set at £733 (including tax), which represented a staggering ninety-four weeks' wages for the average worker at the time. Despite this, the car was an immediate success and Holden could not satisfy demand quickly enough. Eighteen thousand people had signed up and paid their deposit without even having seen the vehicle.
  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights by United Nations

    Universal Declaration of Human Rights by United Nations
    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, was the result of the experience of the Second World War. With the end of that war, and the creation of the United Nations, the international community vowed never again to allow atrocities like those of that conflict happen again. World leaders decided to complement the UN Charter with a road map to guarantee the rights of every individual everywhere.
  • Australians first serve in the Korean War

    Australians first serve in the Korean War
    Some 17000 veterans served in Australia's defence forces during the period 17 June 1950 to 19 April 1956.
  • The Victa motor mower is invented

    The Victa motor mower is invented
    Mervyn Victor Richardson invented the first 'Victa' rotary lawnmower in the1950s. Richardson's Victa mower had blades mounted in a cylinder. But it was a lighter and more powerful mower than those that existed at the time. The mower was made for Richardson's son, Garry, who had started a lawn-mowing business. Mervyn made the mowers in the garage of his home, Within two years of setting up the business, Victa had sold 20 000 mowers and was beginning to export them.
  • Korean War Ends

    Korean War Ends
    The Korean War finally ended in July 1953. Left in its wake were four million military and civilian casualties, including 33,600 American, 16,000 UN allied, 415,000 South Korean, and 520,000 North Korean dead. There were also an estimated 900,000 Chinese casualties. Half of Korea's industry was destroyed and a third of all homes. The disruption of civilian life was almost complete.
  • 'Rock Around the Clock' by Bill Haley and the Comets starts the rock'n roll era

    'Rock Around the Clock' by Bill Haley and the Comets starts the rock'n roll era
    March 25, 1955, "Rock Around The Clock" was featured in the movie Blackboard Jungle, which gave it a surge in popularity and prompted Decca to re-release the single. This time, the song surged to the top of the charts, entering the Top-40 on May 14, 1955 and hitting #1 on July 9, where it stayed for 8 weeks.
  • TV starts in Australia

    TV starts in Australia
    Mainstream professional television was launched in Sydney.
  • Melbourne hosts the Olympic Games

    Melbourne hosts the Olympic Games
    The XVI Olympic Games were held in Melbourne Australia over sixteen days from 22 November until 8 December 1956.
    The Games were held in Melbourne, Australia. Over 3,000 athletes participated from 67 countries. These Olympics were the first where athletic events took place in two countries. This was because the health services of Australia did not allow the horse-back riding events to be carried out in their country. The riding event took place in Stockholm, Sweden.
  • First satellite in space, 'Sputnik'

    First satellite in space, 'Sputnik'
    Sputnik was the first artificial satellite to be put into Earth's orbit. It was launched into an elliptical low Earth orbit by the Soviet Union on October 4, 1957. The unanticipated announcement of Sputnik 1's success precipitated the Sputnik crisis in the United States and ignited the Space Race, a part of the larger Cold War. The launch ushered in new political, military, technological, and scientific developments. While the Sputnik launch was a single event, it made the start of the Space Age
  • First dog in space, 'Laika'

    First dog in space, 'Laika'
    Launch on November 3, 1957, aboard the Soviet's Sputnik 2, Laika, a dog, became the very first living creature to enter orbit. However, since the Soviets did not create a re-entry plan, Laika died in space. Laika's death sparked debates about animal rights around the world.
  • First human in space, Yuri Gagarin

    First human in space, Yuri Gagarin
    April 12 was already a huge day in space history twenty years before the launch of the first shuttle mission. On that day in 1961, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin (left, on the way to the launch pad) became the first human in space, making a 108-minute orbital flight in his Vostok 1 spacecraft. Newspapers like The Huntsville Times (right) trumpeted Gagarin's accomplishment.
  • First Australian soldiers sent to South Vietnam

    First Australian soldiers sent to South Vietnam
    Australia's involvement in the Vietnam War began as a small commitment of 30 men in 1962, and increased over the following decade to a peak of 7,672 Australians deployed in South Vietnam or in support of Australian forces there. The Vietnam War was the longest and most controversial war Australia has ever fought.
  • The Beatles tour Australia

    The Beatles tour Australia
    By the time the group arrived in Australia in June 1964, they had conquered the world. In January, "I want to hold your hand" had hit the number one spot on the US charts and in February the group had made their legendary appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show. The Beatles were a worldwide phenomenon and their 1000 pound paycheck was a bargain for the people of Australia.
  • Decimal currency replaces pounds, shillings and pence

    Decimal currency replaces pounds, shillings and pence
    In Australia, on the 14th of February, 1966, the old British based Pounds, Shillings and Pence currency, was replaced with a decimal currency based on the Australian Dollar. There were 12 Pennies in a Shilling and 20 Shillings in a Pound.
  • First human heart transplant-in south Africa

    First human heart transplant-in south Africa
    The world's first human heart transplant was performed by Christiaan Barnard on Louis Washkansky in 1967.
  • First human on moon, Neil Armstrong

    First human on moon, Neil Armstrong
    It was July 20, 1969 when Neil Armstrong spoke what must be considered the most famous words of the 20th century, "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind". This, of course, was the day that men from Earth first set foot on the Moon. It was the culmination of years of research and development, success and failure, and bitter competition from our feared rivals. And it was the words of a 38 year old Neil Armstrong that echo in the annals of history.
  • Australian troops withdraw from Vietnam

    Australian troops withdraw from Vietnam
    The withdrawal began 6/1/1972 of Australia's forces from South Vietnam began when 8 RAR completed its tour of duty and was not replaced. A phased withdrawal followed, and by 11 January 1973 Australian involvement in hostilities in Vietnam had ceased.
  • Cyclone Tracy wrecks Darwin

    Cyclone Tracy wrecks Darwin
    Cyclone Tracy was a tropical cyclone that devastated the city of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, from Christmas Eve to Christmas Day, 1974. It is the most compact hurricane or equivalent-strength tropical cyclone on record. Tracy killed 71 people, caused $837 million in damage (1974 AUD) and destroyed more than 70 percent of Darwin's buildings, including 80 percent of houses.
  • First colour TV broadcast in Australia

    First colour TV broadcast in Australia
    In Australia, colour transmissions began to be tested on the commercial television networks on 19 October 1974. It can be presumed tht some viewers had purchased a colour TV by then. Colour television was officially implemented on 1 March 1975
  • Elvis Presley dies

    Elvis Presley dies
    Prescription drug abuse severely compromised his health, and he died suddenly in 1977 at the age of 42.
  • Azaria Chamberlain taken by a dingo at Ayers Rock (Uluru)

    Azaria Chamberlain taken by a dingo at Ayers Rock (Uluru)
    Azaria Chamberlain died on 17 August 1980. Her mother Lindy Chamberlain was found guilty of her baby's murder and sentenced to life imprisonment, while Mr Chamberlain was found guilty of being an accessory.
    Both were later exonerated on all charges, after the chance discovery of a fragment of Azaria's clothing in an area dotted with dingo lairs.
  • The film 'Gallipoli' released

    The film 'Gallipoli' released
    Gallipoli is about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Army during the First World War. They are sent to the peninsula of Gallipoli in the Ottoman Empire (in modern day Turkey), where they take part in the Gallipoli Campaign. During the course of the movie, the young men slowly lose their innocence about the purpose of war. The climax of the movie occurs on the Anzac battlefield at Gallipoli and depicts the futile attack at the Battle of the Nek.
  • South-West Tasmania is placed on the World Heritage list

    South-West Tasmania is placed on the World Heritage list
    In 1982, the existing National Parks of Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair, Franklin-Lower Gordon Wild Rivers, & Southwest were inscribed on the World Heritage List as the Western Tasmania Wilderness national Parks World Heritage Area (1.2 million hectares). A further 600 000 hectares including national Parks, Conservation Areas, Forest Reserves, Protected Archaeological sites & around 300 hectares of freehold land were incorporated & then renamed area inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1989.
  • Ash Wednesday bushfires killed 72 people in Victoria

    Ash Wednesday bushfires killed 72 people in Victoria
    The fire destroyed more than 2000 homes and huge areas of forest and farmland. Firefighters saved many other lives. In some areas of south-east Australia there had been no rain for four years. The whole area was dry.
  • Newcastle Earthquake

    Newcastle Earthquake
    On December 28, 1989, a magnitude 5.6 earthquake struck Newcastle, causing extensive damage and killing 13 people. This earthquake proved that even Australia is not immune from damaging earthquakes causing significant human and economic Most of the damage occured to unreinforced masonry buildings which had been built between 1900 and 1950. Over 3000 residences were damaged throughout the city.
  • First Australian Woman Premier Carmen Lawrence, WA

    First Australian Woman Premier Carmen Lawrence, WA
    When Premier Dowding was deposed in February 1990 Dr Lawrence became Australia's first woman premier 12 February 1990 and also held additional portfolios including Treasurer, Minister for Public Sector Management, Women's Interests, Family, Aboriginal Affairs and Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs.
  • Rabbit calcivirus disease accidentally released

    Rabbit calcivirus disease accidentally released
    10 October 1995 the virus accidently released from the quarantine area and then spread to the mainland. It moved quickly through South Australia and on to western New South Wales, killing rabbits in its wake. Before long, infected rabbits were found in parts of Victoria, Queensland, New South Wales, the Northern Territory and Western Australia.
  • Port Arthur massacre in Tasmania

    Port Arthur massacre in Tasmania
    The Port Arthur massacre of 28 April 1996 was a killing spree in which 35 people were killed and 21 wounded, mainly at the historic. Port Arthur prison colony, a popular tourist site in south-eastern Tasmania, Australia. Martin Bryant, a 28-year-old from New Town, a suburb of Hobart, eventually pleaded guilty to the crimes and was given 35 life sentences without possibility of parole. He is now interned in the Wilfred Lopes Centre near Risdon Prison.
  • Death of Princess Diana

    Death of Princess Diana
    Just after midnight on August 31, 1997, in Paris, a car carrying Diana, Princess of Wales, and her new love interest, "Dodi" Fayed, plus a bodyguard and a driver, went out of control in a Paris tunnel and crashed. Fayed and the driver were killed instantly; Diana died later in a hospital despite efforts to save her. The bodyguard survived despite critical injuries.
  • Death of the last remaining 25 April Anzac, Ted Matthews

    Death of the last remaining 25 April Anzac, Ted Matthews
    Ted Matthews, the last of the original ANZAC died on Wednesday December 11 1997 - aged 101, 82 years after he landed at Gallipoli and helped forge the greatest Australian legend. His death removes the last living link with the most defining moment in Australian history and the last memories of the act that began the entire tradition of ANZAC. Mr Matthews was the last survivor of the men who went ashore in the first Gallipoli landing at dawn on April 25, 1915.
  • Australian troops go to East Timor as peacekeepers

    Australian troops go to East Timor as peacekeepers
    In September 1999, Australian peacekeepers moved into East Timor, as part of a multinational force sponsored by the United Nations, to assist East Timor's transition to independence from Indonesia. It has been the largest Australian commitment to a peacekeeping operation to date.
  • World population reaches six billion

    World population reaches six billion
    Less than three months before the dawn of the 21st century, planet Earth welcomed its 6 billionth inhabitant. Shortly after midnight in Sarajevo, Bosnia, Fatima Nevic gave birth to a historic 8-pound boy.
    The Day of 6 Billion came only 80 days before the year 2000, providing excellent comparisons to past populations. In only 40 years, the world population had doubled. In 100 years, it had quadrupled. In only 12 years, it had increased by one billion.
  • Sydney hosts the Olympic Games

    Sydney hosts the Olympic Games
    The Sydney 2000 Summer Olympic Games or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event which was celebrated between 13 September and 1 October 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It was the second time that the Summer Olympics were held in the Southern Hemisphere, the first one being in Melbourne in 1956, and as a result of this location and the dates, took place in early spring.