Civil War Timeline Directions

  • Missouri compromise

    Missouri compromise
    The Missouri Compromise was a United States federal statute devised by Henry Clay. It regulated slavery in the country's western territories by prohibiting the practice in the former Louisiana Territory north of the parallel 36°30′ north, except within the boundaries of the proposed state of Missouri.
  • Manifest Destiny

    Manifest Destiny
    In the 19th century, Manifest Destiny was a widely held belief in the United States that its settlers were destined to expand across North America. Historian Frederick Merk says this concept was born out of "a sense of mission to redeem the Old World by high example ... generated by the potentialities of a new earth for building a new heaven
  • Santa Fe Trail

    Santa Fe Trail
    The Santa Fe Trail was a 19th-century transportation route through central North America that connected Independence, Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico
  • Oregon trail

    Oregon trail
    The Oregon Trail is a 2,170-mile (3,490 km) historic east–west, large-wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon.
  • San Felipe de Austin

    San Felipe de Austin
    The San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site preserves a portion of the townsite of San Felipe de Austin. Founded in 1823 by Stephen F. Austin, San Felipe de Austin served as the capital for the colony Austin established in Mexican-owned Texas.
  • Mexico abolishes slavery

    Mexico abolishes slavery
    History of slavery in Texas ... In 1829 the Guerrero decree conditionally abolished slavery throughout Mexican territories. ... In 1829 Mexico abolished slavery
  • Stephen f Austin goes to jail

    Stephen f Austin goes to jail
    Stephen Fuller Austin was a reluctant revolutionary. His father, Moses Austin, won permission from the Mexican government in 1821 to settle 300 Anglo-American families in Texas. When Moses died before realizing his plans, Stephen took over and established the fledgling Texas community on the lower reaches of the
  • Texas Revplution

    Texas Revplution
    Texas Revolution; The campaigns of the Texas Revolution: Date: October 2, 1835 – April 21, 1836 (6 months, 2 weeks and 5 days) Location
  • Mexican-American war

    Mexican-American war
    The Mexican–American War, also known as the Mexican War, the U.S.–Mexican War or the Invasion of Mexico, was an armed conflict between the United States of America and the United Mexican States from 1846 to 1848. It followed in the wake of the 1845 US annexation of Texas, which Mexico considered part of its territory, despite the 1836 Texas Revolution.
  • Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

    Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
    The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, officially entitled the Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits and Settlement between the United States of America and the Mexican Republic, is the peace treaty signed on February 2, 1848, in the Villa de Guadalupe Hidalgo (now a neighborhood of Mexico City) between the United States and Mexico that ended the Mexican–American War (1846–48).
  • The libarator

    The libarator
    The Liberator (1831–1865) was an abolitionist newspaper founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Isaac Knapp in 1831. Garrison co-published weekly issues of The anti-slavery
  • The north star

    The north star
    For other newspapers named North Star, ... Germany in World War II; Norway; Poland; Portugal; ... Essays on Politics and Race in the Civil War Era (Kent, Kent State ...
  • Compromise of 1850

    Compromise of 1850
    The Compromise of 1850 was a package of five separate bills passed by the United States Congress in September 1850, which defused a four-year political confrontation between slave and free states regarding the status of territories acquired during the Mexican-American War (1846–1848).
  • Fugitive slave act

    Fugitive slave act
    The Fugitive Slave Law or Fugitive Slave Act was passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850, as part of the Compromise of 1850 between Southern slave-holding interests and Northern Free-Soilers.
  • Underground railroad

    Underground railroad
    The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century enslaved people of African descent in the United States in efforts to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause. The term is also applied to the abolitionists, both black and white, free and enslaved, who aided the fugitives.
  • Harriet Tubman

    Harriet Tubman
    Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross; c. 1822 – March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist, humanitarian, and an armed scout and spy for the United States Army
  • Uncle toms cabine

    Uncle toms cabine
    Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly, is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in 1852, the novel
  • Kansas-Nebraska

    Kansas-Nebraska
    The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by the U.S. Congress on May 30, 1854. It allowed people in the territories of Kansas and Nebraska to decide for themselves whether or not to allow slavery within their borders.
  • Dread Scott

    Dread Scott
    Dred Scott (c. 1799 – September 17, 1858) was an enslaved African American man in the United States who unsuccessfully sued for his freedom and that of his wife and family
  • Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas debates

    Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas debates
    The Lincoln–Douglas Debates of 1858 (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate.
  • Abraham lincoln becomes a pres

    Abraham lincoln becomes a pres
    Abraham Lincoln is elected the 16th president of the United States over a deeply divided Democratic Party, becoming the first Republican to win the presidency.
  • Formation of confedaracy

    Formation of confedaracy
    Formation of the Confederacy States began seceding after the Election of Abraham Lincoln, even before he was inaugurated. South Carolina (December 20 )
  • Attack on Fort Sumter

    Attack on Fort Sumter
    Gen. Beauregard, in command of the provisional Confederate forces at Charleston, South Carolina, demanded the surrender of the Union garrison of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor. Garrison commander Anderson refused. On April 12, Confederate batteries opened fire on the fort, which was unable to reply effectively.
  • Battle of bull run

    Battle of bull run
    The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as First Manassas (the name used by Confederate forces), was fought on July 21, 1861, in Prince William County, Virginia, near the city of Manassas, not far from Washington, D.C. It was the first major battle of the American Civil War.
  • Battle of antietam

    Battle of antietam
    Battle of Antietam (Battle of Sharpsburg) Part of the American Civil War: The Battle of Antietam, by Kurz & Allison (1878), depicting the scene of action at Burnside ...
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation
    The Emancipation Proclamation was a presidential proclamation and executive order issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863. It purported to change the way of the country
  • Conscription

    Conscription
    Conscription, or drafting, is the compulsory enlistment of people in a national service, most often a military service. Conscription dates back to antiquity and continues in some countries to the present day under various names.
  • income tax

    income tax
    An income tax is a government levy (tax) imposed on individuals or entities (taxpayers) that varies with the income or profits (taxable income) of the taxpayer. Details vary widely by jurisdiction. Many jurisdictions refer to income tax on business entities as companies tax or corporate tax.
  • Battle at Gettysburg

    Battle at Gettysburg
    The Battle of Gettysburg, fought from July 1 to July 3, 1863, is considered the most important engagement of the American Civil War. After a great victory over Union forces at Chancellorsville, General Robert E. Lee marched his Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania in late June 1863.
  • Gettysburg adress

    Gettysburg adress
    The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known in American history. It was delivered by Lincoln during the American Civil war
  • Battle at Vicksburg

    Battle at Vicksburg
    The Siege of Vicksburg (May 18 – July 4, 1863) was the final major military action in the Vicksburg Campaign of the American Civil War. In a series of maneuvers ...
  • Shermans March

    Shermans March
    Sherman’s March. Sherman’s March to the Sea was a campaign during the American Civil War. It was a march from Atlanta, GA to Savannah, GA.
  • Surrender at appatomax curt house

    Surrender at appatomax curt house
    after the ten-month Siege of Petersburg, retreated west, hoping to join his army with the Confederate forces in North Carolina. Union forces pursued and cut off the Confederate's retreat at the village of Appomattox Court House. Lee launched an attack to break through the Union force to his front, assuming the Union force consisted entirely of cavalry. When he realized that the cavalry was backed up by two corps of Union infantry, he had no choice but to surrender.
  • Thirteen amendment

    Thirteen amendment
    The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution officially abolished slavery in America, and was ratified on December 6, 1865, after the conclusion of the American Civil War.
  • Assasination of Lincoln

    Assasination of Lincoln
    John Wilkes Booth shot him in the back of the head with a .44 caliber Derringer on April 14 1865 at Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C.