The Expanding Nation

  • Northern American States Versus the South

    The Southern states viewed this proposal as unfair and urged to be excluded from paying locomotive establishment. Moreover, another large conflict was the high tariffs. The North were avaricious, they sought after to pass a law on high tariffs for imported goods so as to maintain a domestic form of trade between the northern and southern states, rather than importing goods from European countries. In addition to railroad difficulties and tariffs, slavery was also a significant concern. The nort
  • Slavery Under Attack

    But beginning in the mid-1840s with renewed westward expansion, the slavery issue increased sectional tensions. (Davidson et al, 2007)
    Through political hurdles with slavery, trade, states’ exclusive economic beliefs, “Manifest Destiny,” and sectionalism, political parties formed separations from other states, created constitutions (relative to the United States Constitution), and “found themselves unable to represent the interests of their constituents across sectional lines” (Mc Carty, 2007).
  • Independent American farmers

    “By 1850 the notion of independent American farmers living mainly on what they themselves produced (Crèvecoeur’s vision of the 1780s) had become a dream of the past” (Davidson, et al., 2002). Americans put to use machines, acquired the products of machines, and depended on them. Amidst the Civil War, which was a period of swift expansion through immigration and economics, America came forth as a leading nation.
  • Slavery Under Attack

    On March 4, 1865, Abraham Lincoln took the oath of office for President of the United States for the second time. On that occasion, with the end of the Civil War in sight, he gave one of the most famous speeches in American presidential history.
  • Moving West

    In the early 19th Century, Americans reallocated west in considerable numbers. Davidson, et al. state that “the vast areas of land available for settlement absorbed much of the burgeoning population. As settlers streamed west, speculation in western lands reached frenzied proportions” (2002). Westward movement was spurred by a number of circumstances. Possibly the most significant factor in the immense western push was the creation of a rail line, in addition to people immigrating from other cou
  • Moving West

    “With the enormous growth of the West in the first half of the nineteenth century, coupled with the unprecedented influx of immigrants, especially from Ireland and Germany, the nation’s population numbered over 23 million persons at mid-century” (Mc Carty). From the time of Reconstruction to the end of the 19th century, the United States went through an economic alteration that involved the perfecting of the industrial economy, the quick magnification of big business, the progress of large-scale
  • Moving West

    The late 19th century stamped a sensational outbreak of technological novelty, which fueled headlong economic growth and transferred material advantages to various Americans. The advances in productive and extractive ventures that technology allowed also had economical effects that Americans were just beginning to comprehend and defy. The upsurge of the American corporation and the advent of industry brought about a concentration of the nation’s productive dimensions in many fewer hands, thus c
  • Northern American States Versus the South

    The northern American states were skirmishing to abolish slavery and to pass a law on high tariffs. The South on the other hand is fighting for slavery and to cease the high tariffs. The market economy was emerging to become an influence to American culture and lifestyle; thus becoming a main cause of conflict due to its pressure from the development of self-reliant state economies, differing political views, locomotive rail-lines, trade, tariffs, and slavery. The northern states’ railroads were
  • Northern American States Versus the South

    We think it is wrong not confining itself merely to the persons of the States where it exists, but that it is a wrong which in its tendency, to say the least, affects the existence of the whole nation. Because we think it wrong, we propose a course of policy that shall deal with it as a wrong. We deal with it as with any other wrong, insofar as we can prevent it growing any larger, and so deal with it that in the run of time there may be some promise of an end to it." The abolishment of slavery
  • Slavery Under Attack

    As slavery came under mounting attack, white southerners rallied to protect their peculiar institution. They developed a set of arguments defending slavery as a positive good. Both political parties in the South strongly defended the institution and southern rights. Many Americans, both North and South, shared the same values: personal independence, social egalitarianism, evangelical Protestantism.