2º TimeLine 2ºEvaluation

  • Erich Ludendorff

    Erich Ludendorff
    Erich Ludendorff was of Germany's senior army commanders in World War One. Ludendorff found fame after German victories at Tannenburg and the Masurian Lakes. Working with Paul von Hindenburg, he was responsible for destroying Russia's army on the Eastern Front.
  • Friedrich Ebert

    Friedrich Ebert
    Friedrich Ebert was born in Heidelburg in February 1871 and died in February 1925. Ebert was Weimar Germany's first president and was instrumental in introducing Weimar's constitution which was to play an important part in the downfall of the Weimar Republic. Ebert had a relatively humble beginning as he worked as a saddler before becoming a journalist. Ebert got involved with trade unionism and as a natural progression, moved to politics.
  • Reform Act

    Reform Act
    The 1872 Reform Act gave all male householders the vote.
  • Gustav Stresemann

    Gustav Stresemann
    Gustav Stresemann (May 10, 1878-October 3, 1929) was the son of a prosperous owner of a restaurant and tavern. In his early years he helped in the family business and, since he was a lonely boy, assiduously pursued his studies. After attending the Andreas Real Gymnasium in Berlin, Stresemann studied literature, philosophy, and political economy at Berlin and Leipzig. During these student days, he discovered that he had powers of leadership as well as a capacity for literary attainment.
  • Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini

    Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini
    Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini, 29 July 1883 – 28 April 1945) was an Italian politician, journalist, and leader of the National Fascist Party, ruling the country as Prime Minister from 1922 until his ousting in 1943. He ruled constitutionally until 1925, when he dropped all pretense of democracy and set up a legal dictatorship. Known as Il Duce ("the leader"), Mussolini was one of the key figures in the creation of fascism
  • Socialist group founded in 1884

    Socialist group founded in 1884
    The SDF (Social Democratic Federation) thought violent revolution was the only way to achieve change
  • Ernst Röhm

    Ernst Röhm
    Born in Munich in 1887, Ernst Röhm joined the German army as a teenager and served in World War I. He became acquainted with Adolf Hitler in 1919. Hitler shrewdly took note of Röhm's intensely militaristic nature, his experience in the war and the fact that he was the leader of an extreme right-wing paramilitary organization called the Frontbann--one of many such units, called "freikorps", that existed in Germany at the time--and he persuaded Röhm to join his fledgling Nazi party.
  • Adolf Hitler

    Adolf Hitler
    Adolf Hitler, 20 April 1889 – 30 April 1945) was an Austrian-born German politician and the leader of the Nazi Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP); National Socialist German Workers Party). He was chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and dictator of Nazi Germany (as Führer und Reichskanzler) from 1934 to 1945. Hitler was at the centre of Nazi Germany, World War II in Europe, and the Holocaust.
  • Martin Niemöller

    Martin Niemöller
    Martin Niemöller (1892-1984) was a prominent Protestant pastor who emerged as an outspoken public foe of Adolf Hitler and spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps, despite his ardent nationalism. Niemöller is perhaps best remembered for the quotation: “First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out...”
  • Hermann Goering

    Hermann Goering
    Born in Germany in 1893, Hermann Göring was a leader of the Nazi Party. He played a prominent role in organizing the Nazi police state in Germany and established concentration camps for the "corrective treatment" of individuals. Indicted by the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg in 1946, Göring was condemned to hang as a war criminal, but he took cyanide the night he was to be executed.
  • JB Priestley

    JB Priestley
    J.B.Priestley was born John Priestley on September 13th 1894 in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the son of a schoolmaster. His mother died when he was very young, and he was brought up by his stepmother.After leaving Belle Vue School when he was 16, he worked in a wool office. But, already determined to become a writer, he spent his hard earned money on buying books, and used his spare time trying different kinds of writing, including a regular unpaid column in a newspaper, the Bradford Pioneer.
  • Josef Goebbels

    Josef Goebbels
    Born on October 29, 1897, in Rheydt, Germany, Joseph Goebbels served as minister of propaganda for the Nazi German government of the Third Reich, and is generally held responsible for presenting a favorable image of the Nazi regime to the Germans. Following Adolf Hitler's suicide, Goebbels served as chancellor of Germany for a single day before he and his wife, Magda Goebbels, poisoned their six children and took their own lives.
  • Liberals and Conservatives represent views

    They represent the upper and middle classes.
  • Heinrich Himmler

    Heinrich Himmler
    Heinrich Himmler was born on October 7, 1900, in Munich, Germany. In 1926, he became Hitler's deputy propaganda chief. In 1929, he was appointed commander of the Schutzstaffel. In 1933, he took command of the Gestapo, and expanded it. He became chief of all German police in 1936, and minister of the interior in 1943. He was expelled from the Nazi party that year. He commited suicide to escape capture on May 23, 1945, in Lunberg, Germany.
  • George Orwell

    George Orwell
    Eric Blair was born in 1903 in Motihari, Bengal, in the then British colony of India, where his father, Richard, worked for the Opium Department of the Civil Service. His mother, Ida, brought him to England at the age of one. He did not see his father again until 1907, when Richard visited England for three months before leaving again until 1912. Eric had an older sister named Marjorie and a younger sister named Avril. With his characteristic humour, he would later describe his family's backgrou
  • Year in which MPs first get a salary

    1911 For the first time MPs (member Parliament) got a salary (£400 a year)
  • Year in which MPs first get a salary

    1911 For the first time MPs (member Parliament) got a salary (£400 a year).
  • Brief notes on the Spartacist Revolt

    Brief notes on the Spartacist Revolt
    In 1919, the Communists led by Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg tried to take over Berlin in the Spartacist Revolt, but they were defeated by the Freikorps.
  • People who belonged to trade unions

    People who belonged to trade unions
    The total number of union membership in 1920 was 8 million.
    (The picture shows all the people who belonged to trade unions placed in Trafalgar Square, London)
  • Brief notes on the Kapp Putsch.

    Brief notes on the Kapp Putsch.
    In 1920, some of the right-wing Freikorps themselves took part in the Kapp Putsch (Putsch = revolt), led by Wolfgang Kapp, they took over Berlin to form another government. The workers staged a General Strike and Kapp gave up.
  • New unions

    New union was founded: the Amalgamated Engineering Union in 1920.
  • British mines have trouble selling their coal

    British mines have trouble selling their coal
    People were beginning to use gas, oil and electricity more than coal
    Mines in Germany and Poland were using efficient modern machinery which produced more coal more quickly and more cheaply
    Customers couldn’t afford British coal, and the mines became less and less profitable.
  • New union

    Transport and General Workers’ Union in 1921.
  • Results of the French occupation of the Ruhr

    Results of the French occupation of the Ruhr
    This led to fury in Germany, while workers in the Ruhr refused to work: the government started printing money to pay the striking workers: hyperinflation, with 3 major results:
    - Wages were paid twice a day before prices went up again
    - The Middle Class lost out as bank saving became worthless
    - The German Mark became worthless.
  • SS

    SS
    The SS, formed in 1925 as a personal force for Hitler and the leading Nazis.
    (In the photo appears the SS members, when it´s was formed)
  • Sort of strikes which were made illegal in the Trades Disputes Act

    Sort of strikes which were made illegal in the Trades Disputes Act
    The Act made it illegal for a union to join a general strike or a sympathy strike (one where you go on strike to support workers from a different union).
    (In the photograph we can see a strike in 1927)
  • Effect which the General Strike have on many workers

    Many workers began to realize that the Labour Party was their best hope of changing the system and in 1929 Labour won the General Election.
  • Things which an unemployed man have to do.

    Things which an unemployed man have to do.
    He had to prove that he was actively looking for work
    His family had to show it needed the extra money from the dole: Means Test.
    (The photo shows two men looking for a job)
  • Reasons why Dictators came to power

    Reasons why Dictators came to power
    Locarno had only settled the Western Borders of Germany: it wanted to expand on the East
    Depression affected most countries
    Democracy was blamed for the bad conditions
    Communism seen as a threat to all Europe
    Isolationism continued
    France was suspicious of Germany
    Disarmament failed
  • Writers who wrote about the poverty in Britain

    Writers who wrote about the poverty in Britain
    JB Priestley
    George Orwell
    (In the image we´re seeing George Orwell).
  • Fascist group which was growing in popularity in Britain

    Fascist group which was growing in popularity in Britain
    Oswald Mosley’s ‘Blackshirt’ fascist party
  • Two effects of the Import Duties Act

    -This made goods coming from abroad more expensive than British goods and increased sales of British products.
    -This 10% tax also gave the Government a valuable new income.
  • Who beat Hitler in the Presidential elections?

    President Hindenburg said he’d win easily but didn’t win a majority in the first election; in the second ballot he won 53% and beat Hitler who won 36.8% of the vote.
  • Appointed Chancellor at the time of the November 1932 Reichstag elections

    Appointed Chancellor at the time of the November 1932 Reichstag elections
    Hindenburg appointed Kurt von Schleicher as Chancellor.
    (In the photograph we can see Kurt von Schleicher)
  • Main aims of Adolf Hitler

    Main aims of Adolf Hitler
    He wanted to reverse the results of the Versailles Treaty, and bring all the former German peoples back under his control.
  • 17. What did Hitler’s Enabling Bill allow him to do in March 1933?

    Hitler declared the Communist party illegal; this gave him support in parliament to bring in an Enabling Bill which was passed with threats and bargaining in March 1933; this bill let him govern for four years without parliament and made all other parties illegal: Hitler was almost in full control.
  • Death of Hindenburg in 1934

    Death of Hindenburg in 1934
    The SA had been destroyed, and a month later, when Hindenburg died, Hitler combined the posts of Chancellor and President, made himself Commander-in-Chief of the Army, and was called Der Führer (the leader).
    (In the image I show the funeral of Hindenburg in 1934)
  • Gestapo

    Gestapo
    The Gestapo were secret police and could arrest anybody without cause. It began in 20 April 1934.
  • Why did Mussolini invade Abyssinia?

    Abyssinia was well-positioned for Italy to add to her lands in Africa
    Italy joined Japan and Germany in the Anti-Comintern Pact
  • Why was Manchuria so important to the Japanese?

    The League of Nations sent Lord Lytton to assess the situation, producing a report which said the Japanese had been wrong, but the League didn’t do anything else to end the crisis.
    Japan signed a treaty with Germany in 1936 and in 1937 started to invade China –again the League did nothing to stop it
  • Germany send troops, reasons why nobody stopped them.

    Germany send troops, reasons why nobody stopped them.
    Into the Rhineland
    The League of Nations was busy with the Italian invasion of Abyssinia
    Britain protested but refused to act
    France was in the middle of an election campaign.
  • Two achievements of the Nazi programme of Public Works

    Hitler started a huge programme of public works, which gave jobs to thousands of people, including the stadium which would hold the 1936 Olympic Games.
  • Black athlete who won four medals at the Berlin Olympics

    Black athlete who won four medals at the Berlin Olympics
    Jesse Owens
    (In the image we see Jesse Owens)
  • Unemployment Assistance board take over organizing.

    Unemployment Assistance board take over organizing.
    The Unemployment Assistance Board took over organizing the dole and Means Tests, labour exchanges (job centres) and training schemes to help people learn skills which would get them jobs in different parts of the country.
    (Photo: former labour leader making a speech against the Unemployment Assistance)
  • Area of Czechoslovakia that Hitler wanted

    Area of Czechoslovakia that Hitler wanted
    Sudetenland (in the picture, Sudetenland is the orange part)
  • What did Hitler do in March 1939

    Hitler took the rest of Czechoslovakia (non-German lands)
  • Soviet Union make an agreement with Germany

    Soviet Union make an agreement with Germany
    The USSR never trusted the French, and couldn’t understand why nobody stood up to Hitler earlier. After Munich, Stalin decided to negotiate with Germany in order to protect the USSR
  • What happened after Hitler invaded Poland?

    What happened after Hitler invaded Poland?
    This was too much: BR and FR ordered him to leave. He ignored them and BR declared war on GER on 3rd September 1939.