Tri-2 exam timeline 1790-1860

By 204449
  • Delaware

    Delaware
    The nation's first scheduled steam railroad began in New Castle in 1831.
  • Pennsylvania

    Pennsylvania
    Nickname:
    Keystone State
  • New Jersey

    New Jersey
    Nickname:
    Garden State
  • Georgia

    Georgia
    Nickname:
    Peach State
  • Connecticut

    Connecticut
    Nickname:
    Constitution State
  • Massachusetts

    Massachusetts
    Nickname:
    Bay State
  • Maryland

    Maryland
    Nickname:
    Old Line State
  • South Carolina

    South Carolina
    Nickname:
    Palmetto State
  • New Hampshire

    New Hampshire
    Nickname:
    Granite State
  • Virginia

    Virginia
    Nickname: Old Dominion
  • New York

    New York
    Nickname: Empire State
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    George Washington

    On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States.
  • North Carolina

    North Carolina
    Nickname: Tar Heel State
  • Rhode Island

    Rhode Island
    Nickname: The Ocean State
  • Vermont

    Vermont
    Nickname: Green Mountain State
  • Kentucky

    Kentucky
    Nickname: Bluegrass State
  • The Whiskey Rebellion

    The Whiskey Rebellion was a revolt by farmers in western Pennsylvania who objected to a federal tax on whiskey. President Washington sent in troops under the command of Alexander Hamilton to quell the revolt. In a 1794 letter to Governor Thomas Mifflin of Pennsylvania Hamilton reported “while it shews a great proportion of the Inhabitants of those Counties disposed to pursue the path of Duty, shews also.
  • Tennessee

    Tennessee
    State nickname: Volunteer state
  • Washington's farewell address

    The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the executive government of the United States being not far distant, and the time actually arrived when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprise you of the resolution I have formed.
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    John Adams

    John Adams, a remarkable political philosopher, served as the second president of the United States (1797-1801), after serving as the first vice president under George Washington.
  • The alien and sedition acts

    The Naturalization Act increased the waiting period for citizenship. The Alien Act gave the president the power to arrest and deport aliens. The Alien Enemy Act allowed the government to arrest and deport citizens of countries at war with the United States. The Sedition Act stifled opposition to the government and promised to punish those who would “defame [the government and members of the government], or bring either into contempt or disrepute.
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    John Brown and the armed resistance

    In 1859 he led a raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry. During the raid, he seized the armory; seven people were killed, and ten or more were injured. He intended to arm slaves with weapons from the arsenal, but the attack failed.Dissatisfied with the pacifism encouraged by the organized abolitionist movement.
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    Thomas Jefferson

    Thomas Jefferson, a spokesman for democracy, was an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and the third President of the United States (1801–1809).
  • Marbury v. Madison

    The case resulted from a petition to the Supreme Court by William Marbury, who had been appointed Justice of the Peace in the District of Columbia by President John Adams but whose commission was not subsequently delivered. Marbury petitioned the Supreme Court to force the new Secretary of State James Madison to deliver the documents. The Court, with John Marshall as Chief Justice, found firstly that Madison's refusal to deliver the commission was both illegal and correctible. It was denied
  • Ohio

    Ohio
    Nickname: Buckeye State
  • Lousiana Purchase

    The Louisiana Purchase encompassed 530,000,000 acres of territory in North America that the United States purchased from France in 1803 for $15 million.
  • Lewis and Clark

    Lewis and Clark
    May 14, William Clark and nearly four dozen other men met up with Meriwether Lewis on May 20. The Lewis and Clark expedition—"the Corps of Discovery"—began making its way up the Missouri aboard a 55-foot-long (17-meter-long) keelboat and two smaller pirogues. As they traveled, Clark spent most of his time on the keelboat, charting the course and making maps, while Lewis was often ashore, studying the rock formations, soil, animals, and plants along the way.
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    Lewis and Clark

    May 14, William Clark and nearly four dozen other men met up with Meriwether Lewis on May 20. The Lewis and Clark expedition—"the Corps of Discovery"—began making its way up the Missouri aboard a 55-foot-long (17-meter-long) keelboat and two smaller pirogues. As they traveled, Clark spent most of his time on the keelboat, charting the course and making maps, while Lewis was often ashore, studying the rock formations, soil, animals, and plants along the way.
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    James Maddison

    James Madison, America's fourth President (1809-1817), made a major contribution to the ratification of the Constitution by writing The Federalist Papers, along with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. In later years, when he was referred to as the "Father of the Constitution."
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    War of 1812

    War with British. Respect from british
  • Louisina

    Louisina
    Nickname a: Pelican State
  • Indiana

    Indiana
    Nickname: Hoosier State
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    James Monroe

    James Monroe was the fifth President of the United States (1817–1825) and the last president from the Founding Fathers of the United States.
  • Mississippi

    Mississippi
    Nickname:
    Magnolia State
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    Dartmouth college v. woodward

    In 1816, the New Hampshire legislature attempted to change Dartmouth College-- a privately funded institution--into a state university. The legislature changed the school's corporate charter by transferring the control of trustee appointments to the governor. In an attempt to regain authority over the resources of Dartmouth College, the old trustees filed suit against William H. Woodward, who sided with the new appointees. Chief Justice Marshall's opinion. Dartmouth won.
  • Illinois

    Illinois
    Nickname:
    Prairie State
  • Transcontiental Treaty (1819)

    was a treaty between the United States and Spain in 1819 that gave Florida to the U.S. and set out a boundary between the U.S. and Mexico. It settled a standing border dispute between the two countries and was considered a triumph of American diplomacy.
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    McCullouch v. Maryland

    In 1818, the state of Maryland passed legislation to impose taxes on the bank. James W. McCulloch, the cashier of the Baltimore branch of the bank, refused to pay the tax.Chief Justice Marshall noted. the laws made in pursuance thereof are supreme. . .they control the constitution and laws of the respective states, and cannot be controlled by them. mcCullouch won.
  • Alabama

    Alabama
    Nickname:
    Yellowhammer State
  • Missouri Compromise

    The Missouri Compromise was a federal statute in the United States that regulated slavery in the country's western territories. The compromise, devised by Henry Clay, was agreed to by the pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States Congress and passed as a law in 1820.
  • Maine

    Maine
    Nickname: Pine Tree State
  • Missouri

    Missouri
    Nickname: show me state
  • Monroe Doctrine

    President James Monroe in December 1823, the doctrine warns European nations that the United States would not tolerate further colonization or puppet monarchs. The doctrine was conceived to meet major concerns of the moment, but it soon became a watchword of U.S. policy in the Western Hemisphere.
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    Gibbons V. Ogden

    A New York state law gave to individuals the exclusive right to operate steamboats on waters within state jurisdiction. In this case Thomas Gibbons -- a steamboat owner who did business between New York and New Jersey under a federal coastal license -- challenged the monopoly license granted by New York to Aaron Ogden. Gibbons won.
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    John Quincy Adams

    John Quincy Adams, son of John and Abigail Adams, served as the sixth President of the United States from 1825 to 1829. A member of multiple political parties over the years, he also served as a diplomat, a Senator and member of the House of Representatives.
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    Andrew Jackson

    Andrew Jackson was the 7th President of the United States from 1829-1837, seeking to act as the direct representative of the common man.
  • Nat Turners Rebellion

    Nat Turner's Rebellion (also known as the Southampton Insurrection) was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, during August 1831.[1] Led by Nat Turner, rebel slaves killed anywhere from 55 to 65 people, the highest number of fatalities caused by any slave uprising in the American South. The rebellion was put down within a few days, but Turner survived in hiding for more than two months afterwards.
  • Horace Mann's campaign for free compulsory public education

    Horace Mann and the education reformers' primary purpose was to bring local school districts under centralized town authority and to achieve some degree of uniformity among the towns through a state agency. They believed that popular schooling could be transformed into a powerful instrument for social unity.
  • Chief Justice John Marshall

    Chief Justice John Marshall was born on September 24, 1755, in rural Fauquier County, near Germantown on the Virginia frontier. He was the first of 15 children born to Thomas Marshall and Mary Randolph Keith. His father was a land surveyor for Lord Fairfax, and made a tidy income; his cousin was Humphrey Marshall, who would later become a U.S. senator for Kentucky. John Marshall and his father were descendents of colonist William Randolph, who had helped establish the Commonwealth of Virginia.
  • Arkansas

    Arkansas
    Nickname: The Natural State
  • Michigan

    Michigan
    Nickname: The Great Lakes State
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    Van Buren

    Martin Van Buren was the eighth President of the United States (1837–1841), after serving as the eighth Vice President and the tenth secretary of state, both under Andrew Jackson. While the country was prosperous when the "Little Magician" was elected, less than three months later the financial panic of 1837 punctured the prosperity.
  • Trail of Tears

    In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, the Cherokee nation was forced to give up its lands east of the Mississippi River and to migrate to an area in present-day Oklahoma.
  • Manifest Destiny

    Manifest Destiny is a term for the attitude prevalent during the 19th century period of American expansion that the United States not only could, but was destined to, stretch from coast to coast. This attitude helped fuel western settlement, Native American removal and war with Mexico.
  • Abolitionist Movement

    The Abolitionist movement in the United States of America was an effort to end slavery in a nation that valued personal freedom and believed "all men are created equal." In 1829, David Walker, a freeman of color originally from the South, published An Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World in Boston, Massachusetts.
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    William Henry Harrison

    William Henry Harrison, an American military officer and politician, was the ninth President of the United States (1841), the oldest president to be elected at the time. He became the first to die in office on his 32nd day, serving the shortest tenure in United States presidential history.
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    John Tyler

    John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth President of the United States (1841–1845). He was elected vice president on the 1840 Whig ticket with William Henry Harrison, and became president after his running mate's death in April 1841.
  • Florida

    Florida
    Nickname: The Sunshine State
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    James J Polk

    Often referred to as the first "dark horse," James Knox Polk was the 11th President of the United States from 1845-1849, the last strong President until the Civil War.
  • Texas

    Texas
    Nickname: The Lonestar State
  • Frederick Douglass

    After escaping from slavery, he became a leader of the abolitionist movement, gaining note for his dazzling oratory[4] and incisive antislavery writing. Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, c. February 1818[3] – February 20, 1895) was an African-American social reformer, orator, writer, and statesman.
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    American-Mexican War

    It pitted a politically divided and militarily unprepared Mexico against the expansionist-minded administration of U.S. President James K. Polk, who believed the United States had a “manifest destiny” to spread across the continent to the Pacific Ocean. A border skirmish along the Rio Grande started off the fighting and was followed by a series of U.S. victories. When the dust cleared, Mexico had lost about one-third of its territory, including nearly all of present-day California, Utah, Nevada.
  • Iowa

    Iowa
    Nickname: Hawkeyes State
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the Seneca Falls Convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized women's rights and women's suffrage movements in the United States.
  • Wisconsin

    Wisconsin
    Nickname: Badger State
  • Senca Falls Resolution

    The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women's rights convention. It advertised itself as "a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman".[2] Held in Seneca Falls, New York, it spanned two days over July 19–20, 1848. Attracting widespread attention, it was soon followed by other women's rights conventions, including one in Rochester, New York two weeks later. In 1850 the first in a series of annual National Women's Rights Conventions met in Worcester,
  • Seneca Falls Convection

    It advertised itself as "a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman".[2] Held in Seneca Falls, New York, it spanned two days over July 19–20, 1848. Attracting widespread attention, it was soon followed by other women's rights conventions, including one in Rochester, New York two weeks later. In 1850 the first in a series of annual National Women's Rights Conventions met in Worcester, Massachusetts.
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    Zachary Taylor

    Zachary Taylor, a general and national hero in the United States Army from the time of the Mexican-American War and the the War of 1812, was later elected the 12th President of the United States, serving from March 1849 until his death in July 1850.
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    Millard Fillmore

    Millard Fillmore, a member of the Whig party, was the 13th President of the United States (1850–1853) and the last president not to be affiliated with either the Democratic or Republican parties.
  • California

    California
    Nickname: Golden State
  • William Lloyd Garrison

    He is best known as the editor of the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, which he founded in 1831 and published in Massachusetts until slavery was abolished by Constitutional amendment after the American Civil War. He was one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society. He promoted "immediate emancipation" of slaves in the United States. In the 1870s, Garrison became a prominent voice for the woman suffrage movement.
  • Susan B. Anthony

    Because she was a woman, she was not allowed to speak at temperance rallies. This experience, and her acquaintance with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led her to join the women's rights movement in 1852. Soon after, she dedicated her life to woman suffrage. Susan B. Anthony was born February 15, 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts. She was brought up in a Quaker family with long activist traditions. Early in her life she developed a sense of justice and moral zeal.
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    Franklin Pierce

    Franklin Pierce became 14th President of the United States at a time of apparent tranquility (1853–1857). By pursuing the recommendations of southern advisers, Pierce--a New Englander--hoped to prevent still another outbreak of that storm.
  • Harriet Tubman and the undergorund railroad

    After Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery, she returned to slave-holding states many times to help other slaves escape. She led them safely to the northern free states and to Canada. using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry, and in the post-war era struggled for women's suffrage. Maryland
  • Sojourner Truth

    An African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist.Her best-known extemporaneous speech on gender inequalities, "Ain't I a Woman?", was delivered in 1851 at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. Her speech was delivered at the Women's Convention in Akron, Ohio, on May 29, 1851, and was not originally known by any title.
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    Dredd Scott Vs. Sanford

    Dred Scott was a slave in Missouri. From 1833 to 1843, he resided in Illinois (a free state) and in an area of the Louisiana Territory, where slavery was forbidden by the Missouri Compromise of 1820. After returning to Missouri, Scott sued unsuccessfully in the Missouri courts for his freedom, claiming that his residence in free territory made him a free man. Scott then brought a new suit in federal court. Scott's master maintained that no pure-blooded Negro of African descent. Sandford won.
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    James Buchanan

    James Buchanan, Jr., the 15th President of the United States (1857–1861), served immediately prior to the American Civil War. He remains the only president to be elected from Pennsylvania and to remain a lifelong bachelor.
  • Minnesota

    Minnesota
    Nickname: North Star State
  • Oregon

    Oregon
    Nickname: Beaver State
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    Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln became the United States' 16th President in 1861, issuing the Emancipation Proclamation that declared forever free those slaves within the Confederacy in 1863.