Tate Burchfield: US History

  • Jun 15, 1215

    Magna Carta signed

    Magna Carta signed
    The first document limiting the power of the King
  • Founding of the Colony, Jamestown

    Founding of the Colony, Jamestown
    Jamestown was the first successful colony founded by the British
  • Virginia House of Burgesses founded

    Virginia House of Burgesses founded
    The Virginia House of Burgesses is considered the first self-representative government in the New World.
  • Mayflower Compact

     Mayflower Compact
    Pilgrims, escaping religious persecution, went aboard the Mayflower and sailed to the new world-hopefully for the Virginia Colony. Although this, many non pilgrims were aboard; in order to establish order on the boat the Mayflower Compact. The Mayflower compact is the first self contract of the New world.
  • Plymouth Rock founded

    Plymouth Rock founded
    Pilgrims, escaping religious persecution from England, founded the colony of Plymouth in the later-formed Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • English Bill of Rights signed

    English Bill of Rights signed
    The English Bill of Rights was a document that gave rights to the people of England
  • Period: to

    French and Indian War

    The war between the French and British over the Ohio River Valley. Greatly expanded the Colonies
  • Proclamation of 1763

    Proclamation of 1763
    A proclamation of King George III that forbade colonists from passing the Appalachian Mountains in an attempt to avoid conflicts with the Native Americans
  • Sugar Act passed

    Sugar Act passed
    The Sugar Act, also known as the American Revenue Act, was a revenue-raising act passed by the British Parliament of Great Britain in April of 1764. Taxed on Sugar products
  • Stamp Act passed by Parliment

    Stamp Act passed by Parliment
    Parliment passed this act to get money for reimbursement after the French and Indian War. Colonists did not like these, and said ¨No Taxation without representation¨. Was a tax on Stamps and paper projects.
  • Boston Massacre

    Boston Massacre
    The Boston Massacre, known to the British as the Incident on King Street, was a confrontation on March 5, 1770 in which British soldiers shot and killed several people while being harassed by a mob in Boston. The event was heavily publicized by leading Patriots such as Paul Revere and Samuel Adams.
  • Tea Act passed by Parliment

    Tea Act passed by Parliment
    The Tea Act was the final straw in a series of unpopular policies and taxes imposed by Britain on her American colonies. The policy ignited a “powder keg” of opposition and resentment among American colonists and was the catalyst of the Boston Tea Party.
  • Boston Tea Party

    Boston Tea Party
    The Boston Tea Party was a political and mercantile protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1773
  • Intolerable acts passed by Parliment

    Intolerable acts passed by Parliment
    The Intolerable Acts were laws passed by the Parliament in 1774 after the Boston Tea Party. The laws were meant to punish the Massachusetts colonists for their defiance in the Tea Party protest in reaction to changes in taxation by the British of goods.
  • Battle of Lexington and Concord

    Battle of Lexington and Concord
    he Battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War. The battles were fought on April 19, 1775 in Middlesex County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, within the towns of Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Menotomy, and Cambridge. Patriots of the Colonies formed together to fight for the independence of the American colonies
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    US Revolutionary War

    The American Revolutionary War, also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. Battles: Bunker Hill, Saratoga, Winter at Valley Forge, Yorktown
  • Declaration of Independence

    Declaration of Independence
    The Declaration of Independence, 1776. By issuing the Declaration of Independence, adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, the 13 American colonies severed their political connections to Great Britain. The Declaration summarized the colonists' motivations for seeking independence.
  • Battle of Saratoga

    Battle of Saratoga
    A Patriot victory against the British which resulted in French support for the colonies
  • Battle of Yorktown

    Battle of Yorktown
    British general Cornwallis surrendered to George Washington as French and American forces trapped the British at Yorktown. The British surrender at the Battle of Yorktown ended the American Revolutionary War.
  • Constitution ratified

    Constitution ratified
    The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. The Constitution, originally comprising seven articles, delineates the national frame of government. Washington becomes President
  • Alien and Sedition Act

    Alien and Sedition Act
    A series of laws known collectively as the Alien and Sedition Acts were passed by the Federalist Congress in 1798 and signed into law by President Adams. These laws included new powers to deport foreigners as well as making it harder for new immigrants to vote. Passed by John Adams
  • Louisiana Purchase

    Louisiana Purchase
    The Louisiana Purchase (1803) was a land deal between the United States and France, in which the U.S. acquired approximately 827,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River for $15 million.
  • War of 1812

    War of 1812
    War of 1812, (June 18, 1812–February 17, 1815), conflict fought between the United States and Great Britain over British violations of U.S. maritime rights. It ended with the exchange of ratifications of the Treaty of Ghent.
  • Andrew Jackson

    Andrew Jackson
    Andrew Jackson was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Before being elected to the presidency, Jackson gained fame as a general in the United States Army and served in both houses of Congress.
  • Andrew Jackson elected to office

    Andrew Jackson elected to office
    Andrew Jackson was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Before being elected to the presidency, Jackson gained fame as a general in the United States Army and served in both houses of Congress
  • Nat Turner's slave insurrection

    Nat Turner's slave insurrection
    Nat Turner's Rebellion was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, in August 1831, led by Nat Turner. Rebel slaves killed from 55 to 65 people, at least 51 being white. The rebellion was put down within a few days, but Turner survived in hiding for more than two months afterwards
  • Nat Turner's Slave Insurrection

    Nat Turner's Slave Insurrection
    Nat Turner's Rebellion was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, in August 1831, led by Nat Turner. Rebel slaves killed from 55 to 65 people, at least 51 being white.
  • Nullification Crisis

    Nullification Crisis
    The Nullification Crisis was a United States sectional political crisis in 1832–33, during the presidency of Andrew Jackson, which involved a confrontation between the state of South Carolina and the federal government
  • Mexican-American War

    Mexican-American War
    The Mexican–American War was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848. Started at Texas-Mexico border
  • Mexican American War

    Mexican American War
    The Mexican-American War (1846-1848) marked the first U.S. armed conflict chiefly fought on foreign soil. It pitted a politically divided and militarily unprepared Mexico against the expansionist-minded administration of U.S. President James K. Polk, who believed the United States
  • Abraham Lincoln elected to office

    Abraham Lincoln elected to office
    United States presidential election of 1860, American presidential election held on Nov. 6, 1860, in which Republican Abraham Lincoln defeated Southern Democrat John C. Breckinridge, Democrat Stephen A. Douglas, and Constitutional Union candidate John Bell.
  • President Abraham Lincoln elected to office

    President Abraham Lincoln elected to office
    In 1858 Lincoln ran against Stephen A. Douglas for Senator. He lost the election, but in debating with Douglas he gained a national reputation that won him the Republican nomination for President in 1860. As President, he built the Republican Party into a strong national organization.
  • Battle of Fort Sumter

    Battle of Fort Sumter
    The Battle of Fort Sumter (April 12–13, 1861) was the bombardment of Fort Sumter near Charleston, South Carolina by the Confederate States Army, and the return gunfire and subsequent surrender by the United States Army, that started the American Civil War.
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    US Civil war

    The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South.The Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. War broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States.
  • Battle of Antietam

    Battle of Antietam
    The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the Southern United States, was a battle of the American Civil War, fought on September 17, 1862,It was one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War and remains the single bloodiest day in American history with over 23,000 casualties. President Abraham Lincoln used the Union victory at Antietam to make his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862.
  • Siege of Vicksburg

    Siege of Vicksburg
    The Siege of Vicksburg was a major military action in the Vicksburg Campaign of the American Civil War. In a series of maneuvers, Union Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and his Army of the Tennessee crossed the Mississippi River and drove the Confederate Army of Mississippi, led by Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton, into the defensive lines surrounding the fortress city of Vicksburg, Mississippi.
  • Battle of Gettysburg

    Battle of Gettysburg
    The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war's turning point.
  • Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

    On April 9, 1865, near the town of Appomattox Court House, Virginia, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to Union General Ulysses S. Grant. ... But the resulting Battle of Appomattox Court House, which lasted only a few hours, effectively brought the four-year Civil War to an end.
  • Abraham Lincoln Shot

    Abraham Lincoln Shot
    On the evening of April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, a famous actor and Confederate sympathizer, assassinated President Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. The attack came only five days after Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his massive army at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, effectively ending the American Civil War.
  • First Black codes established

    First Black codes established
    The Black Codes were laws passed by Southern states in 1865 and 1866 in the United States after the American Civil War with the intent and the effect of restricting African Americans' freedom, and of compelling them to work in a labor economy based on low wages or debt.
  • Compromise of 1877

    Compromise of 1877
    The Black Codes were laws passed by Southern states in 1865 and 1866 in the United States after the American Civil War with the intent and the effect of restricting African Americans' freedom, and of compelling them to work in a labor economy based on low wages or debt.