"Stamped - Ziqi"

By ziqi
  • 1410

    First Known African Racist, Page 27

    First Known African Racist, Page 27
    His name was John, the first known antiblack racist in colonial America.
  • 1415

    Prince Henry, Page 22

    Prince Henry, Page 22
    Prince Henry was the son of King John of Portugal. he convinced King John to capture the main trading depot from the northeaster tip of Mcorocco.(22)
  • 1474

    The World's First Racist, Page 23

    The World's First Racist, Page 23
    But neither Prince Henry nor King John of Portugal
    was given the title World’s First Racist, because the truth
    is, capturing people wasn’t an unusual thing back then.
    Just a fact of life. That illustrious moniker would go to a
    man named neither Henry nor John but something way
    more awesome, who did something not awesome at all—
    Gomes Eanes de Zurara.
  • 1474

    Climate Theory, Page 29

    Climate Theory, Page 29
    this actually came from Aristotle, who questioned whether Africans were born "this way" or if the heat of the continent made them inferior.
  • 1474

    Curse Theory, Page 29

    Curse Theory, Page 29
    Countries are cursed by their institutions when the rules of the game, and the shared beliefs and expectations that underpin those rules, produce outcomes that harm the majority of the population, if not portions of the ruling class.
  • Lucilio Vanini, Page 39

    Lucilio Vanini, Page 39
    He believed Africans were born of a "different Adam," and had a different creation story.
  • John Pory, Page 35

    John Pory, Page 35
    was named America's first legislative leader. first thing he did was set the price of tobacco, seeing as it would be the country's cash crop.
  • Glorious Revolution, Page 49

    Glorious Revolution, Page 49
    he created a new villain as a distraction.
  • Richard Baxter, Page 38

    Richard Baxter, Page 38
    He even said there were "voluntary slaves," as in Africans who wanted to be slaves so that they could be baptized.
  • John Locke, Page 39

    John Locke, Page 39
    He believed that the most unblemished, purest, perfect minds belonged to Whites, which basically meant Africans had dirty brains.
  • Cotton Mather, Page 47

    Cotton Mather, Page 47
    An eleven-year-old Harvard student (the youngest of all time), he was obviously a nerd, and no top of all that, he was extremely religious.
  • First Great Awakening, Page 53

    First Great Awakening, Page 53
    which swept through the colonies in the 1730s, spearheaded by a Connecticut man named Jonathan Edwards.
  • Thomas Jefferson, Page 57,58

    Thomas Jefferson, Page 57,58
    His father owned the second-largest number of enslaved people in Albemarle County, Virginia.
  • Benjamin Rush, Page 61

    Benjamin Rush, Page 61
    Wrote a pamphlet saying that Black people weren't born savages but instead were made savages by slavery.
  • John Wheatley, Page 60

    John Wheatley, Page 60
    In 1772, John Wheatley, Phillis's adoptive father, got eighteen of the smartest men in America together in Boston so that they could test her.
  • Thomas Jefferson, Page 68

    Thomas Jefferson, Page 68
    Wrote, "All men are created equal."
  • The Great Compromise, Page 72

    The Great Compromise, Page 72
    created the House and the Senate.
  • Three-Fifths Compromise, Page 73

    Three-Fifths Compromise, Page 73
    Every five slaves equaled three humans. so, just to do the math, that's like saying if there were fifteen slaves in the room, on paper, they counted as only nine people.
  • Thomas Jefferson, Page 82

    Thomas Jefferson, Page 82
    Became president in 1801.
  • Thomas Jefferson, Page 82

    Thomas Jefferson, Page 82
    He brought about a new Slave Trade Act. The goal was to stop the import of people from Africa and the Caribbean into America, and fine illegal slave traders.
  • The Missouri Compromise, Page 86

    The Missouri Compromise, Page 86
    Admit Missouri as a slave, but they'd also admit Maine as a free state to make sure there was still an equal amount of slave states and free states and free states, so that no region, or way of governing, felt disadvantaged.
  • Boston had grown to nearly sixty thousand people, Page 94

    Boston had grown to nearly sixty thousand people, Page 94
    Boston had grown to nearly sixty thousand people and was fully immersed in New England's industrial revolution, which was now running on the wheels of southern cotton.
  • Garrison, Page 95

    Garrison, Page 95
    He was smart and forward-thinking and worked as an editor of a Quaker-run abolitionist newspaper.
  • John C. Calhoun, Page 102

    John C. Calhoun, Page 102
    John C. Calhoun, a senator from South Carolina, was the emcee for slavery—an effective one—there to rock the racist crowd.
  • Frederick Douglass, Page 103

    Frederick Douglass, Page 103
    In June 1845, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an
    American Slave was published. It outlined Douglass’s life and gave a firsthand account of the horrors of slavery.
  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Page 104

    Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Page 104
    The book was called Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
    The author, Harriet Beecher Stowe.
  • Black people, Page 110

    Black people, Page 110
    Black people as people but know that mistreating and enslaving
    them are bad for business. Bad for your brand. Bad for your opportunity. That’s more in line of who Lincoln was.
  • Lincoln was against Black voting, Page 112

    Lincoln was against Black voting, Page 112
    Lincoln was against Black voting.
    Lincoln was against racial equality.
    Lincoln and the party pledged not to challenge southern slavery.
    And Lincoln won.
  • Civil War, Page 114

    Civil War, Page 114
    The biggest change agent in the war was that slaves wanted to fight against their slave owners, and therefore join Northern soldiers in battle.
  • Andrew Johnson, Page 119

    Andrew Johnson, Page 119
    he basically reversed a lot of Lincoln’s promises, allowing Confederate states to bar Blacks from voting, and making sure their emancipation was upheld only if Black people didn’t break laws.
  • The abolitionist William Lloyd garrison, Page 93

    The abolitionist William Lloyd garrison, Page 93
    The abolitionist William Lloyd garrison like that -a man with power and privilege, not afraid to try.
  • William Lloyd Garrison, Page 118

     William Lloyd Garrison, Page 118
    He believed that because emancipation was imminent, his job as an abolitionist was done.
  • Lincoln’s successor, Page 119

    Lincoln’s successor, Page 119
    Lincoln’s successor was forcefully breaking in. And breaking down what had been, for Black people, a breakthrough.
  • Period: to

    "History of Racism and Antiracism."