Public Enemy 1982

Timeline created by AEE
In Music
  • Agreement signed

    Agreement signed
    The American president declares: "I have not yet passed the test of fire, but it will become inevitable." This foreshadowed a war, and it was indeed the first Gulf War that followed in Iraq.
  • Suburbanisation

    Suburbanisation
    40% of white New Yorkers lived in the suburbs compared to 8% of blacks. This suburbanization would lead to de facto segregation (it has been forbidden in law since the Fair Housing Act of 1968). From an unconscious threshold of 10 to 20% blacks, whites leave the neighborhood to settle a little further away. Playing on these antagonisms and the fear of diversity.
    They push white people to sell to buy further and resell to black families.
  • Public Enemy 1982

    Public Enemy 1982
    Known for taking radical political positions critical of the media in favor of the African-American community.
    The band has been characterized from the beginning with a sound that is both very aggressive on the instrumental level and very committed on the lyrical level, focused on the condition of the Black community in the United States. Ex: the logo of the band ==> designed by Chuck D, one of the band's rappers and leader, it represents a black youth in the sights of a policeman.
  • Fight The Power 1990

    Fight The Power 1990
    A piece that strongly invites us to fight against racism, to revolt against those who approve of this act. He also wants Blacks to no longer be set apart from the population because of their skin color and to finally show that they are ready to defend their cause.
    (https://8diagrams.skyrock.com/1732907924-Analyse-d-une-chanson-engagee-Fight-The-Power-de-Public-Enemy-1990.html)
  • Instrumental

    Instrumental
    In rap, this kind of instrumental was revolutionary, partly because the West Coast of the United States was quite dominant, so in New York it took a lot of striking music to get the West Coast machine going again, and it was quite successful! We can also notice that the song starts with "The Marches for Freedom" by Martin Luther King.