Medieval Time line

Timeline created by medieval_times
In Music
  • 400

    The Astrolabe Medeival Era Technology

    The Astrolabe Medeival Era Technology
    The astrolabe was a navigational device invented in 400 by the Arabs to be used to determine latitude by mariners/surveyors to determine the altitude of mountains. This device has had an astronomical instruction to help us measure the diameter of the sun and moon. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • 400

    ART HEAD OF CONSTANTINE THE GREAT

    ART HEAD OF CONSTANTINE THE GREAT
    Parts of this colossal statue was found in the fifteenth century in the basilica of Maxentius in Rome. This marble collossus represented the emporer enthroned, awe-inspiring and giving tremendous impression of power. His facial feature are treated realistically, following the traditions of pagan Roman portraituree.
  • Period:
    450
    to
    Dec 31, 1450

    MEDIEVAL ERA

  • 488

    ARTIST THEODORIC THE GREAT

    ARTIST THEODORIC THE GREAT
    Theodoric The Great was established to the Ostrogothic kindom that didn't last long. Theodoric has admired the roman culture. His brilliant patronage of the art aspired the continuity of the classical tradition of Rome.
  • 500

    The Heavy Plow Medieval Technology

    The Heavy Plow Medieval Technology
    The Heavy Plow was invented in 500 by the Europeans to cut into the sod but also to cut into the soil at the level of grass roots and turn the slice of turf into soil to the side. Another thing the The Heavy Plow was used for was to change the layouts of fields. This Invention has chnged over the years to become bigger and also to be used without animal power. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 1, 750

    The Windmill Medieval era Technology

    The Windmill Medieval era Technology
    The windmill was invented during the 8th century by the Chinese and its purpose was to grind grain and also grind flour. This invention had helped bring mills for tanning, laundering and sawing as well as polish weapons. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 1, 800

    The Decimal Numbers Medieval Era Technology

    The Decimal Numbers was invented in 800 by Arabic cultures to give the people the idea of counting. This has had a termendious impact on society with coming up with so many different forms of mathematics. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 1, 800

    The Horsecollar Medieval Technology

    The Horsecollar Medieval Technology
    The Horsecollar was invented in 800 in Central Asia by someone unknown, to add more comfort for the horses instead of blocking their windpipe. This had an impact on society by allowing the horses to pull against the load in a far more efficient arragement. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 1, 900

    The Horseshoe Medieval Era Technology

    The Horseshoe Medieval Era Technology
    The Horseshoe was invented in 900 to make it more suitable for animals to pull plows and wheeling carts for transporting. This invention has led to an impact of growth on city agriculture and also trade advancements. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 1, 1000

    GunPowder Medieval Era Technology

    Gunpodwer had been invented by the Chinese in 1000 to be used in a variety of weapons like cannons, guns and grenades. This has had an extreme impact throughout the years because we use this to fight in wars and things. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 1, 1000

    Lenses Medieval Era Technology

    Lenses was invented in 1000 by an Arabian scientist Alhazen to be used to see things in a magnification. This has had an impact on society in the science are of study by having scientist be able to use microscopes as well as telescopes. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 1, 1000

    Drawn Wire Medieval Era Technology

    Drawn Wire Medieval Era Technology
    The drawn Wire was invented in 1000 by someone unknown and the purpose of this invention was to be constructed to mesh and as well as used for jewelry. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Apr 9, 1001

    Oil Painting Medieval Era Technology

    Oil Paingting was developed during the 11th century in Belgium. The purpose of this was to create a more lively/beautiful way to paint. This has had such an effect on society because some of the greatest artist have used oil paintings. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Jan 1, 1055

    HILDEBERTUS ARTISTS OF MEIEVAL ERA

    Hilderbertus was a Bohemian artist. He present his work as demonstrating his fastidiousness. Hilderbertus has the combination of gentility and diligence, which is the typical self image of the atrists in the Middle Ages. He left one of the most animated self-portraits from the entire Middle Ages in a copy of "St Augustines Civitas dei"
  • Oct 22, 1071

    Guilhem IX of Aquitane

    Guilhem IX of Aquitane
    William was a lyrical poet whose work "was recorded without music except for one fragment." Mainly he sung about love, lust, and religion. His work contained highly complex rhyme-schemes and was very repetitive. Although little is known about Guilhem IX of Aquitane, he was, perhaps, the most popular troubadour of his time. He died in 1127. John Caldwell, Medieval Music, Fitzroy Square, London: Hutchinson and Co (Publishers) Ltd, 1978), 96.
  • Apr 1, 1128

    The Cannon Medieval Era Technology

    The Cannon Medieval Era Technology
    The Cannon was invented in 1128 by the Chinese to be used as a lighter more mobile weapon for land warfare with a more powerful and longer range but to be also used for ships. This is another invention that has also had a huge impact on society because we use these to fight in wars. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Jan 1, 1130

    ARTIST NICHOLAS OF VERDUN

    Goldsmith and Enameller, who signed two very different works that was the famous pulpit at Klosterneuburg near Vienna and a shrine to the Virgin at Tournai dated 1205. His work showed an incomparable technical proficiency and been identified as contributing to the developement of a new figure and drapery style.
  • Mar 25, 1140

    ART "St Augustines Civitas dei"

    ART  "St Augustines Civitas dei"
    The "St Augustines Civitas dei" is one of the most animated portraits from the Middle Ages. In this picture, Hildebertus portrays himself as well dressed in a long robe, a shoulder brooch and long painted shoes. In the picture Hildebertus aims at a wretched mouse who was trying to steal from the lunch table, and knocking dishes to the floor, distracting both him and his assistant
  • Apr 1, 1150

    Reed Instruments Medieval Era Technology

    Reed Instruments Medieval Era Technology
    Reed instruments was invented in south East Asia in 1150 to allow people to play music through a little piece of grass. It has impacted on our society by allowing us to play many different instruments such as different forms of saxes. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Jan 1, 1151

    ARTIST ABBOT SUGER

    ARTIST  ABBOT SUGER
    Described new administrative financial and artistic acheivements. He also told of some other things, including a bronze throne that still survives. "Throne of Dagobert". Merovingian king were evidently important to Suger
  • Mar 28, 1163

    Leonin

    Leonin
    Considered by Anonymous IV as "the best composer of organum." Compiled "a Magnus liber of two-voice organa for solo sections of graduals, alleluias and responsories for the whole liturgical year." This was later added on to by Perotinus. His Magnus liber survived in the famous Notre Dame manuscripts. He died in 1201. Tess Knighton, and David Fallows, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan, 1992), 396.
  • Jan 1, 1181

    ART KLOSTERNEUBURG ALTAR

    ART KLOSTERNEUBURG ALTAR
    This was one of Nicholas portraits. This is the famous pulpit at Klosterneuberg near Vienna. It was made at the beginning of Nicholas career and finished in 1811. This panel is one of 45 bronze gilt decorated with champleve enamel. It was made in an altar in 1331 after it has been damaged in a fire. Recorded by inscription around the outter edges is the name of Nicholas of Verdun (the maker), and Provost Wernher (the name of patron).
  • Jan 1, 1200

    ART tHRONE OF DAGOBERT

    ART tHRONE OF DAGOBERT
    This piece is from ABBOT SUGER. The age of this throne has been controversal, apperantly since the twelfth century. Its lower portion's comprise a folding (mechanism, making it like a Roman consults seat used for military campaigns. The legs are in form of lion legs and crowned by lion heads.
  • Mar 28, 1200

    Perotinus

    Perotinus
    French composer who lived in 1200. The only informaton known of him came from a person who goes by Anonymous IV. He states that Perotinus revised works of Leoninus and wrote seven pieces. Two of which are Viderunt and Sederunt, four voice organa. The exact year of his death remains unknown. Tess Knighton, and David Fallows, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan, 1992), 405.
  • Jan 1, 1230

    ART MAN AS MICROCOSM

    ART MAN AS MICROCOSM
    This drawing is by Anagni Cathedral. This is a visual schema representing a body of learning derived from ancient Greek metaphysics. It's a figure of a man as microcosm, as the center of the universe. Surrounding him ia a diagram representing the quadripartite division of the comos in the form of four elements. (earth, water. air, fire)
  • May 2, 1230

    Guiraut Riquier

    Guiraut Riquier
    Composer and considered last of the well-known troubadours. He was a lyrical poet like that of William of Aquitaine. He wrote 89 poems that describe details of his life. He served at the courts of Navarre and Castile. Only half of the poems he wrote survived. Tess Knighton, and David Fallows, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan, 1992), 408.
  • Jul 8, 1253

    Thibaut IV Count of Champagne and King of Navarre

    Thibaut IV Count of Champagne and King of Navarre
    The exact year of his birth is unknown; however, we do know that he died in 1253. He wrote many types of music, such as, the chanson avec des refains and the lai. The lai was a narrative poem with ryhming couplets and a double-versicle structure. Thibaut IV composed in a way that "every section" of his music "takes as its point of departure a phrase from the preceding one." John Caldwell, Medieval Music, (Fitzroy Square, London: Hutchinson and Co (Publishers) Ltd, 1978), 105.
  • Jan 1, 1272

    ARTIST EDWARD 1 OF ENLANDS

    ARTIST EDWARD 1 OF ENLANDS
    Early years before he came to the throne were marked by the fighting of two battles against Simon de Montfort and the leading of a Crusade to the Holy Land in 1270. Howveery, placing his tatse and personal history within a wider context, painting that he commissioned for the upper walls of the kings chambers in the palace showed many battle scenes.
  • Mar 30, 1274

    Marchetto da Padova

    Marchetto da Padova
    Italian composer and theorist. Composed motets, but known for his treatises. Lucidarium (1309-1318) questions Pythagoras's idea and develops his own hypothesis about tone. He believed that tone was divided into 5 equal parts. The Pomerium (1318-1326) deals with mensural music. The final treatise Brevis compilacio is a summary of Pomerium. David Fallows, and Tess Knighton, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan Publishing Company, 1992), 398.
  • Feb 1, 1300

    Guillaume de Machaut

    Guillaume de Machaut
    Machaut was a poet and diplomat in the fourteenth-century. He left manuscripts of his work "followed by sections devoted to lais, motets, the Mass, the Hoquetus David, ballades, rondeaux and virelais." A few of his compositions are Le lay de la fonteinne, Par trois raisons, and Le lay de confort. One of Machaut's most unique characteristic in his music is the prelude before the tenor. John Caldwell, Medieval Music, Fitzroy Square, London: Hutchinson and Co (Publishers) Ltd, 1978), 171-173.
  • Mar 25, 1300

    ART "THE DANCE OF DEATH"

    ART "THE DANCE OF DEATH"
    The Dance of Death is a piece made by Vincent Kastav and is often described as a macabre and strange fantasy. The Black Death was in the Middle Ages of the 13th century. It was the worst of the many waves of pestilence that wiped out huge numbers of people all over Europe.
  • Jan 1, 1308

    ART TUTIVILLUS AND GOSSIPS

    ART TUTIVILLUS AND GOSSIPS
    This picture is a wall paintaing made in 1308 by, Reichenau Oberzell. In the picture Tutivillus is a devil who sat on sholders of women who chattered during mass. In this picture , the devil is documenting the woman's transgressions by writing down everything they say.
  • Jan 1, 1323

    ART CATHEDRAL ELY

    ART CATHEDRAL ELY
    This picture is one of the most daring works of the fourteenth century. it was rebuild between 1323 and 1330 on an octagonal plan in deliberate contrast to the rectangular Romanesque transept and nave to the early Gothic choir.
  • Apr 1, 1350

    The Clock Medieval Era Technology

    The Clock  Medieval Era Technology
    The clock was invented by a greek scientist Anaximander during the 14th century. This clock was meant to keep track of time by sundial. Over the years the way clocks are has changed to digital as well as analog. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Jan 1, 1364

    ARTIST CHRISTINE DE PISAN

    ARTIST CHRISTINE DE PISAN
    She was an admirer of Joan of Arc's acievements and her defender. She was an adviser to royalty. Chrisitine derives her authoruty directly from Minerva in the approach she takes the subject,modestly belittling her own statues. Her works are conventionally humble.
  • Apr 1, 1373

    The Canal Lock Medieval Era Technology

    The Canal Lock was invented by the Dutch in 1373 to help the system of impounding water. It had allowed canals to be through sloping terrain, with the locks used to raise or lower a ship or barge from one level to another. It had impacted the United States later on in 1973 when we used a canal to connect the Santee River to the Cooper River. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)
  • Sep 1, 1377

    Oswald von Wolkenstein

    Oswald von Wolkenstein
    South German poet and composer for people of aristocratic birth. Events from his active life in political and diplomatic accounts are included in his compositions. He used many techniques for his compositions, such as, organum, hocket and conductus, and canon. His music was unique from other composers because it included his own life experiences. He died in 1445. Tess Knighton, and David Fallows, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan, 1992),
  • Apr 28, 1390

    John Dunstable

    John Dunstable
    English composer. His "Crux fidelis" shows chanson texture with the painsong in the tenor. He was associated with John, Duke of Bedford, and on his tombstone he is credited as being an astronomer and mathematician as well. John Caldwell, Medieval Music, (Fitzroy Square, London: Hutchinson and Co (Publishers) Ltd, 1978), 222. David Fallows, and Tess Knighton, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan Publishing Company, 1992), 387.
  • Apr 3, 1397

    Francesco Landini

    Francesco Landini
    Landini was one of the greatest Italian composers of the time. Although the exact year of his birth remains a mystery, we do know that most of his life he was blind. He grew up in Florence, Italy and is most famous as a an organist and poet. One of his compositions is ecco la primavera, which translated into english means spring has come, This is a ballata used to accompany dancing. He died in 1397. Roger Kamien, Music: An Appreciation, (The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2011), 85.
  • Aug 5, 1397

    Guillaume Dufay

    Guillaume Dufay
    Dufay created most of the early fifteenth-century styles and techniques. He is best known for his change in manner in his compositions, which greatly influenced other musicians of this time. He lived in Italy from 1420-1433. From 1438-1454 he was singer and chaplain for the Duke of Burgundy. He died in 1474. He composed eight pieces in Italian text.One of which was "Quel fronte signorille." John Caldwell, Medieval Music, (Fitzroy Square, London: Hutchinson and Co (Publishers) Ltd, 1978), 239.
  • Mar 1, 1420

    Johannes Ockeghem

    Johannes Ockeghem
    Ockeghem wrote masses, "which now became the recognized vehicle for muscial thought." Ockeghem's late medieval style was like that of a "true romantic." He used parallel movement and sequence in most of his compositions. A distinct characteristic in his music is that he used more than one text for the voices. A couple of his compositions are Missa Caput and Missa Prolationum. He died in 1495. John Caldwell, Medieval Music, Fitzroy Square, London: Hutchinson and Co (Publishers) Ltd, 1978), 250
  • Dec 30, 1420

    Hugo de Lantins

    Hugo de Lantins
    Composer and in close relationship to Dufay. He composed mass movements, motets, and chansons. His work is characterized by its use of imitation to other musicians of the time. He was most likely the brother to composer Arnold de Lantins. However, little information about him exists and his death remains unknown. Tess Knighton, and David Fallows, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan, 1992), 395.
  • Feb 27, 1440

    Johannes Martini

    Johannes Martini
    Martini was a Flemish composer who worked for most of his career inside the chapel of Ercole I d'Este in Ferrara. He wrote a great deal of homophonic psalm settings as well as other sacred works. He composed secular pieces in French and Italian that may have been written to be performed as an instrumental ensemble. Death is unknown. David Fallows, and Tess Knighton, Companion to Medieval and Reniassance Music, (New York, New York: An Imprint of Macmillan Publishing Company, 1992), 398.
  • Mar 30, 1450

    Heinrich Isaac

    Heinrich Isaac
    Isaac was a native of Brabant and served under Lorenzo de Medici before serving under Maximilian. His most famous works are Choralis Constantinus, which is a series of liturigical works for Mass his pupil completed for him, and a six-part Mass Virgo prudentissima. His unique characteristic was his harmonic stability throughout his compositions. He died in 1517, well after the medieval era. John Caldwell, Medieval Music, (Fitzroy Square, London: Hutchinson and Co (Publishers) Ltd, 1978), 254.
  • Jan 1, 1470

    ART "TREE OF BATTLES"

    ART "TREE OF BATTLES"
    This picture is on of Christine de Pisan's works. This work was concerned with the legal aspects of war, with ethics, military custom , and with the correct behaviour of a soldier. This wrok was written in the late 14th century. By the end of the century it have been published in five languages and was widely read among the aristocracy of France, England,Scotland, and both Catalan and Castilian Spain.
  • Apr 1, 1470

    The Guitar Medieval Era Technology

    The Guitar Medieval Era Technology
    The Guitar Was invented in 1470 in Spain to be played as an instrument to make music. This invention has lead to many different styles of guitars being made throughout years. In the Medieval Era there was three types of Guitars one played with fingers, a bow, and the last one was played with a pick. Charlise, Rodney .P. Scientific american Inventions and Discoveries. (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son's Inc. Publishers, 2004)