Medieval Arts - 1300 -1400

Timeline created by facebooker_520055448172655
  • Jan 1, 1300

    Scrovegni Chapel

    Scrovegni Chapel
    Scrovegni Chapel also known as the Arena Chapel was built in 1300 and consecrated in 1305. Found in Padua, Italy it contains a fresco by Giotto, considered one of the most important works in Western Art. Giotto’s fresco is of the Virgin Mary and follows her life, and celebrate her role in the humanity. The chapel itself was commissioned by Enrico Scrovegni and was said to have been built to help resolve his father, a banker, of the sin of usury, a sin attributed to all bankers at that time.
  • Jan 1, 1300

    The Madonna and Child

    The Madonna and Child
    The Madonna and Child symbolize the religious leaning that artist had during the medieval time period. Many works of Art were commissioned by the church, which limited the artist subject matter. In this painting done by Duccio di Buoninsegna in 1300, he endows the Madonna with a more humanist feel while he explores the relationship between mother and child. Few of Duccio’s work has survived, this panel was one of his last known work.
  • Jan 1, 1300

    Guillaume de Machaut

    Guillaume de Machaut
    Watch here for an example of work.Guillaume de Marchaut was born in 1300 in Reims, France. He was a medieval French composer. He was also a great poet and his work was admired and influential to the work of Geoffrey Chaucer. His beautiful forms of music helped inspire and develop the motet and secular song forms of music.
  • Jan 1, 1302

    Gothic Architecture

    Gothic Architecture
    Gothic architecture is defined by its arches, vaulted roofs, and buttresses. Many of the largest and best works of England are built in the Gothic style, including the great medieval cathedrals, as well as the palaces, and universities. The Gothic style later gave way to the Renaissance in the 16th and 17th century.
  • Jul 20, 1304

    Francesco Petrarch

    Francesco Petrarch
    Look here for the translated example of one of his sonnets.Francesco Petrarch, born July 20, 1304, was an Italian scholar and poet in Italy. He was known as one of the earliest humanist. Petrarch’s poems and sonnets were imitated during the renaissance and he became a model for lyrical poetry. In the 16th century Pietro Bembo used Petrarch influence to help create the modern Italian language.
  • Jan 1, 1305

    The Medieval Flute

    The Medieval Flute
    Watch here for a music from the flute.The medieval flute was often found during the 14th century being played by troubadours and minstrels. It was played to entertain the court and could still be found after that time period. It was made to blend well in musical pieces and could be found playing with other flutes as well as lutes in musical pieces, also often having vocal accompaniment. This unknown artist has captured how the flute was held more like a recorder in the medieval time period.
  • Jan 1, 1305

    Medieval Clothing

    Medieval Clothing
    Long clothing was emphasized and style was basically the same through the social classes. What varied was the quality of the material. The nobility had much of their material imported from other countries, while the other classes made their own. Medieval threads were spindled with a distaff. People favored strong colors, reds and blues, and children frocks were made from linen or wool. Girls wore bonnets and boys round hats.
  • Jan 1, 1310

    Dancing in Europe

    Dancing in Europe
    Watch for an example of a court dance.Dancing in Europe in the middle ages was a very reticent practice since the church played such an important role and they did not approve of dancing. It was still found though along with country dances. Many of our dances today derived from medieval country dances. The flow of country dances were picturesque to watch, but incorporated many intricate steps. Court dances differed from country dances because they were more sedate.
  • Jan 1, 1318

    The Maypole Dance

    The Maypole Dance
    Watch here for a Maypole dance demonstration.The maypole dance has been found since the medieval times, and is danced during many European folk festival. It is part of the first day of May celebrations. It began in many Germanic villages and is thought to be a symbol of trees and maybe refers back to the pagan time and their belief in sacred trees. It was very popular through the renaissance time but became less popular in the 18th and 19th centuries.
  • Jan 1, 1320

    The Lute

    The Lute
    Watch here for music from the luteThe lute was one of the most important instrument during the medieval period. The categories of instruments during that time period were string, wind and percussion. The lute can be referred to any plucked string instrument with a neck. Many beautiful ballads of that time were accompanied by the music of the lute. It was used in a great many instrumental musical scores from the Medieval to late Baroque time periods.
  • Jan 1, 1324

    The tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam

    The tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam
    The tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam was built between 1320 and 1324 in Pakistan in the pre-Mughal architectural style. The tomb was built by Ghias-ud-Din Tughlak during his governship of Depalpur for himself and his descendants. The tomb was built entirely of red brick, with shisham wood used to bound it together. The tomb was renovated in the 1970’s by the Auqaf Department. Glazed Multan tile work is now found beautifully laid around the dome and also wood carving and terra cotta.
  • Jan 1, 1333

    Kunqu Opera

    Kunqu Opera
    Watch here for an example.Kunqu opera is one of the oldest forms of Chinese opera. It was developed during the early Ming Dynasty in the 14th century. Kunqu has influenced many other Chinese opera forms including Peking opera. This mask shows the variations of emotion displayed during a Kungu opera. Today Kunqu is still performed in seven major Chinese cities including Beijing, Shanghai, Suzhou, Nanjing, Chenzhou, Youngia County/,Wenzou , Hangzhou as well as Taipei.
  • Jan 1, 1340

    Mummers

    Mummers
    Mummers are seasonal British plays done by troupes of amateur actors known as mummers or guisers. They were originally from the British Isles and their practice spread to the British colonies. They would sometimes perform in the street, but more often they were found in Pubs or public houses. Usually the performance were largely comedic, but also some included a battle or two and usually some kind of religious reference. Many could be seen during the Christmas season, in the royal court.
  • Nov 21, 1344

    St. Vitus Cathedral

    St. Vitus Cathedral
    St. Vitus Cathedral was founded on November 21, 1344. It is located in Prague and is one of their biggest and most important churches. It is an excellent example of Gothic architecture. It was originally dedicated to St. Vitus, but later included Saints Wenceslaus and Adalbert. It is officially known as The Metropolitan Cathedral of Saints Vitus, Wenceslaus, and Adalbert, but is often referred to as St. Vitus Cathedral. Flying buttresses support the beautiful high vaulted ceilings
  • Jan 1, 1345

    Notre Dame Cathedral

    Notre Dame Cathedral
    Notre Dame Cathedral is one of the most known Cathedrals in the world. Even though construction began in 1163, it was not completed until 1345. It is considered to be one of the greatest examples of French Gothic architecture. Notre Dame was one of the first buildings in the world to use flying buttresses. Notre Dame houses many Catholic treasures such as the crown of thorns, a fragment of the true cross and one of the holy nails.
  • Jan 1, 1350

    Maestro Piero

    Maestro Piero
    Listen to an example of his work.Maestro Piero (1300-1350) is known for his madrigals. He is an Italian composer and one of the first composers of the Trecento who is known by name. The Trecento is an active period of the Arts in Italy and music from the Trecento began new forms of music, especially in secular music. A total of eight of his compositions have survived and two of his works are found in the Rossi Codex. His works are the earliest surviving works in the form of Canonic.
  • Jan 1, 1353

    The Black Death

    The Black Death
    The Black Death was the most devastating epidemic to spread through Europe. It was most prominent in the years 1346-1353. The plague has been estimated to have killed 30-60% of Europe’s population in the 14th Century. This painting captures the pain of that time. The knights cannot protect the suffering people against the angel of death. Many of the paintings of that time reflected that devastation.
  • Jan 1, 1362

    Gherardello da Firenze

    Gherardello da Firenze
    Gherardello da Firenze (1320-1362) was first a clerk in 1342, then became a priest and then a chaplain during the years of the Black Death. He was also an Italian composer known for his works of Sacred Music though little had survived. His secular works is easier to find. He focused his music on madrigals and is typical for early Trecento, following the style of voices singing the same words at the same time.
  • Jan 1, 1365

    Cats in Art

    Cats in Art
    Animals could be found in many examples of medieval art. Many were woven into tapestries who found in paintings. There were also religious connections to animals in medieval time period. Medieval artists portrayed animals in hunting. Also many times animals were found on the coat of arms of families. Cats were often painted in pictures because their relationship to humans is as old as civilization.
  • Dec 1, 1372

    Lorenzo Da Firenze

    Lorenzo Da Firenze
    Lorenzo Da Firenze (Dec 1372) was a music teacher and Italian composer in Trecento. He is one of the composers of that time period known as the ars nova. He was an active teacher in Florence and became a canon at the church of San Lorenzo. Firenze is represented in the illuminated manuscript which is one of the most comprehensive sources of Italian music in the 14th century with 16 pieces of music.
  • Jan 1, 1400

    Santa Maria Novella Cathedral of Florence

    Santa Maria Novella Cathedral of Florence
    Santa Maria Novella Cathedral of Florence was designed with an influence to the renaissance style. Leone Battista Alberti, was a famous architect at the time and used the humanist influence of proportion and classically styled detailing to his design. Inside the cloister and cathedral are stored famous frescoes of the early renaissance period. The building began in the mid 13th century but was not consecrated until 1420.
  • Jan 1, 1400

    The Bastard Executioner

    The Bastard Executioner
    Watch here for a clip from the series. The Bastard Executioner was a historical drama series that began in 2015. It was on FX but was soon cancelled. I included it on my timeline because it artistically portrays the medieval time period. Set in the fourteenth century it is about a Welsh Knight, Wilkin Brattle, in the army of King Edward the first.