Hopwas timeline

By pastorm
  • Period: Aug 11, 1000 to

    Hopwas timeline

  • Jan 1, 1150

    Part of the Royal Cannock Forest in the 12th century

  • Mar 1, 1300

    Dispute leading to killing after William son of William Le Lou passed through the wood at night

    Taken from Plea rolls for Staffordshire-18, Edward II(1284-1327) from British History online
    ..William le Lou stopped him in the vill of Hopewas, and wished to attach him because he had passed by night through the forest, and a dispute being thus raised between them one Roger son of Roger de Swynnerton came up suddenly and killed the said William son of William le Lou; and the said Roger de Wetewode aided and abetted the death of the said William
  • Jan 1, 1550

    Becomes part of the Packington estate

  • In the 17th century becomes part of the Babington family estate

  • Zachary Babington built a dwelling house, known locally as Babington folly and later on as the Woodhouse

    Zachary Babington built a dwelling house, known locally as Babington folly and later on as the Woodhouse
  • Poaching incident

    Taken from Dyotts diary
    An atrocious poaching case occurred in Tom Levett’s wood at Hopwas Hays. His keepers were on the look-out, and at two o’clock in the night of Sunday they fell in with six men, three of them armed with guns. One of the keepers in pursuit of a poacher had a miraculous escape. The fellow, finding he was likely to be taken, turned round, levelled his gun and fired. The muzzle of the gun was so close to the keeper that his neck handkerchief was blackened by the powder, and his
  • Human skeleton discovered in quarry by canal

    Taken from Dyotts diary
    A human skeleton was discovered in Hopwas Hays by some labourers getting stone near the bank of the canal. From appearance it was conjectured to have been in the ground twenty years. A report was in circulation that a man had been murdered near the spot about that time, and that the supposed murderer had died about a year ago, but nothing authentick could be traced. Tom Levett’s man came to