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History Timeline

  • War Measures Act

    War Measures Act
    “A whole gang of men came around and got him and took him over to Clinton Street. They tarred and feathered him. Why? I don’t know. Except he was a German” – Anonymous
    This act was imposed by Canadian Prime Minister; Robert Borden. It gave broad powers to the Canadian government to place restriction on enemy aliens during war. These powers included censorship, the right to detain in labour camps and arrest enemy aliens, and the right to take control over their property.
  • War Measures Act (continue)

    War Measures Act (continue)
    War Measure Act was emplaced because the Canadian Government was suspecting that the enemy aliens are going to harm them. Rumors of sabotage and spies spread rapidly. This was socially bad because there was no equality, freedom and they were not able to fight for their rights. This was economically bad because thousands of enemy aliens were put in labour camps with harsh conditions. Enemy aliens who had job, they lost it and unemployment rate grew. Left: Poster for 'enemy aliens' regestration.
  • Period: to

    World War I & the 1920's

  • Pristine Position for Women

    Pristine Position for Women
    “We had 291 operations in ten nights, so that will give you a fair idea of a week’s work.” – Overseas operation room Nurse
    All women in Canada started to work that they usually wouldn’t do. They volunteered to work overseas as nurses or ambulance drives. Women also worked in munitions factories and other war industries back home. They drove busses and streetcars. They worked in banks, on police forces and in civil service jobs.
  • Pristine Position for Women (continue)

    Pristine Position for Women (continue)
    Most of the men were fighting overseas and women across Canada wanted to play their role in the war. They started doing jobs that was considered was heavy duty jobs and it was unsuitable for women before 1914. As women couldn’t fight overseas so they did what they had to back home.
  • Pristine Position for Women (continue #2)

    Pristine Position for Women (continue #2)
    This was socially good because all women in Canada came together and took part in the war. They took the role as men. This was militaristically good too because women worked in munitions factories and industries to produce war supplies. They worked overseas as nurses and ambulance drivers. Left: Women are working in a munitions factory.
  • Chlorine Strike at Ypres

    Chlorine Strike at Ypres
    “I have never been in a battle- and I have been in many- where the men were suffering in such numbers that their crying and groaning could be heard all over the battlefield.” – Canadian soldier.
    This war was fought between France, British Empire, Belgium against German Empire. As a result of the first Battle of Ypres, a part of the Allied front line bulged into German territory.
  • Chlorine Strike at Ypres (continue)

    Chlorine Strike at Ypres (continue)
    In Ypres, Belgium, Germans disrupted a planned Allied offensive. A German poison-gas attack, the first on the western front, demoralized the Allied Troops and created a large gap in their lines. The Allied lost 60,000 men and the Germans lost about 35,000.This battle began because the Allies thought they could catch the German Army by surprise but as the German's were ready, it certainly wasn’t the case.
  • Chlorine Strike at Ypres (continue #2)

    Chlorine Strike at Ypres (continue #2)
    This was militaristically bad because Allied troops lost more men than the German.This was socially good too because the Canadian troops helped French troops retreat when they got attacked by chlorine gas. This created unity and trust between them. Left: German attacks French front-line with chlorine gas.
  • Suffragists Movement

    Suffragists Movement
    “Certainly women belong in the home, but not 12 hours a day. They should have exactly the same freedom as men” – Nellie McClung
    Nellie McClung, Alice Jamieson, and Emily Murphy against the Canadian Government. Women got together in volunteer organizations and employment. They began to share ideas and work for political equality with men. They also took active roles in journalism and campaigned for better public health, working conditions, and wages.
  • Suffragists Movement (continue)

    Suffragists Movement (continue)
    They pushed for equal opportunities in careers such as medicine and law, and the right to own property. All women got the right to vote in 1925. Women played an important role during the World War I. They took jobs that women usually would not do. They knew that they deserved more so they demanded equal rights as men. They wanted to vote in federal elections.
  • Suffragists Movement (continue #2)

    Suffragists Movement (continue #2)
    This was socially good because women could now vote in federal elections like men. This was politically good because strong, influential politicians like Nellie McClung led women to get the right to vote. Left: A poster realted to, 'women should have the right to vote.'
  • Bloody Battle of Somme

    Bloody Battle of Somme
    “The nation must be taught to bear losses. The nation must be prepared to se heavy casualty list” – General Haig
    This battle took place between British Empire and France against German Empire. In Pas-de-Calais, France, artillery pounded the German trenches for weeks (most of the shots were missed). The infantry advanced across no-mans land. It mangled up the German barbed wire even more. Germans sat it out in reinforced cement bunkers underground. They were mowed down by German machine guns.
  • Bloody Battle of Somme (continue)

    Bloody Battle of Somme (continue)
    Overall, more than 1,000,000 soldiers died during this battle. It was an inconclusive win. The main reason for the battle of the Somme was to take pressure off the French army, which had been under heavy attack at Verdun since February, and was close to cracking. It was hoped that a major British offensive on the Somme would force the Germans to withdraw troops from Verdun.
  • Bloody Battle of Somme (continue #2)

    Bloody Battle of Somme (continue #2)
    This was militaristically bad because over 1 millions artillery shots missed the German machine gun outpost and barbed wires. Allied troops got mowed down by German machine guns as they struggled across No Man’s Land. 1.25 million men died in that battle. This was politically bad too because back home in Canada, people were blaming General Haig and politicians who started the war for this massacre. There was lack of discipline because of this. Left: German machine guns mowed down Allied troops.
  • Conquest at Vimy Ridge

    Conquest at Vimy Ridge
    “Thorough preparation must lead to success Neglect nothing.” – General Currie
    This battle was fought between Britain and Canada against German Empire. In Vimy, Pas-de-Calais, France, there was a stalemate in the war. Both sides were dug in and in trenches. The Germans had the defense and the British kept sending their soldiers running at them and trying to go through barbed wire. The Germans could then train their guns on one spot and shoot.
  • Conquest at Vimy Ridge (continue)

    Conquest at Vimy Ridge (continue)
    Canadian troops made a run for it and even with mustard gas being shot at them they broke through the German lines for the first time. The attack on Vimy Ridge was part of the Battle of Arras. It was designed to draw German reserves away from the area for the impending Neville Offensive, a major French attack. The Attack on Vimy Ridge was made because it was the highest ground in the area; position of the ridge would force the Germans to withdraw from their positions.
  • Conquest at Vimy Ridge (continue #2)

    Conquest at Vimy Ridge (continue #2)
    This was militaristically good because they only 3098 died and 7004 wounded and they captured more land, guns and prisoners. This was politically good too because the victory in this battle helped us to get two seats in the Peace Talks. Left: Canadian troops leaving the trench and trying to get throguh German front-lines.
  • Wartime Elections Act

    Wartime Elections Act
    Ever head the old saying, “Every rose has its thorns”?
    This bill was passed by Conservative Government of Robert Borden in Canada. This act gave mothers, sisters, wives of soldiers in the Armed Forces and Canadian nurses serving in the Force the right to vote. Women who had relatives in the war were allowed to vote. Robert Borden allowed this bill because he wanted to gain votes for his conscription.
  • Wartime Elections Act (continue)

    Wartime Elections Act (continue)
    This was socially bad because some of the English Canadians were with conscriptions and most of the French were against it. They were divided in to two. This was militaristically good for Canada because it provided more troops for war so they can be deployed in the Western Front. Left: Mothers, sisters and wives voting in the Federal Election.
  • Masacare at Passchendaele

    Masacare at Passchendaele
    “I died in hell – (They called it Passchendaele)” – Lieutenant Siegfried.
    This battle took place between France, Belgium and British Empire against German Empire. In Passchendaele, Belgium, British had to break through the German lines and advance to the Belgian coast and Dutch border, thus clearing the Germans completely out of Belgium. However, the whole offensive was a costly, dismal failure.
  • Masacare at Passchendaele (continue)

    Masacare at Passchendaele (continue)
    A mere 7 miles from the British start line, was the only gain, at a cost of almost twice as many casualties as the Germans. In a week, German army took over Passchendale. The purpose of the battle was to create vulnerability in the German lines, continue to the Belgian coast and capture the German submarine bases on the coastline. If the Allies won, it would have been a defining battle, and it would have taken some of the pressure off the French defense forces.
  • Masacare at Passchendaele (continue #2)

    Masacare at Passchendaele (continue #2)
    This was militaristically bad because a lot of Allied troops died at this cost of 7 miles of ground which was soon taken back by the Germans in a week. This was politically bad too because a lot men died in this war which made Canadian PM Minister consider conscription. Left: Battle of Passchendaele (battlefield)
  • Federal Election

    Federal Election
    “One of the most bitter election in Canadian history” – Michael Bliss
    There was a Federal Election between Robert Borden and Wilfred Laurier during WWI in Canada. Main theme driving this election was the issue of conscripting of soldiers. So, laws were passed to make certain that Borden, who supported conscription, would come to power. Borden introduced two laws to skew the voting towards the government. He introduced Wartime Elections Act and Military Voters Act.
  • Federal Election (continue)

    Federal Election (continue)
    The federal government decided in 1917 to conscript men for overseas military service. Voluntary recruitment was failing to maintain troop numbers, and Borden believed in the military value. That’s why the election took place. This was socially bad because it separated English Canadians and the French from each other. However, this was militaristically good because conscription provided a lot of troops for the war so they can be deployed in the Western Front. Left: Young men being conscripted.
  • Women's Christian Temperance Union

    Women's Christian Temperance Union
    “Herb is the healing of a Nation, Alcohol is the destruction” – Member of WTCU
    Women’s Christian Temperance Union also know as WTCU is a women organization that campaigns to raises awareness that alcohol is bad in every way and it should banned in the county and to the men fighting overseas. The WTCU movement established itself through much of Canada. One of the core values behind the temperance movement was the complete abolition of alcohol and it attempted to spread this message in every way.
  • Women's Christian Temperance Union (continue)

    Women's Christian Temperance Union (continue)
    They believed that Alcohol was a waste of resources. Alcohol was made out of wheat and wheat could be used for other important resources such as bread. WTCU didn’t like the production of liquor so they started a campaign to ban it.
  • Women's Christian Temperance Union (continue #2)

    Women's Christian Temperance Union (continue #2)
    This was socially good because a lot of people, especially WCTU, wanted to ban the consumption, and the production of alcohol. This created a common cause for some people.
    But this was socially bad because there was a whole another group that apposed WCTU. Those people who wanted alcohol didn’t agree to WCTU. This caused social unrest throughout Canada. Left: WTCU protesting to ban alcohol.
  • Labour Turmoil

    Labour Turmoil
    It was a a social war against Employers against employees. Employees in Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg and Montreal went on strike because their voices were not getting heard by the Government. Government imposed a law that it is forbidden to strike. Many people went back to their jobs agian.
  • Labour Turmoil (continue)

    Labour Turmoil (continue)
    Employees wanted to make their demands heard and there was only one way – strike. They wanted decent wages, an 8 hour day and the right to bargain for better working conditions. This was socially bad because there was no unity and trust between employers and employees. There was labour unrest in Canada. This was economically bad too because all the people were in strike. Canada Shut downed. No one was working and all the employees were in the street protesting. Left: Winnipeg General Strike.
  • One Big Union

    One Big Union
    “We have fought for this country, and by God, we are going to own it.” – Member of One Big Union
    One Big Union is also known as OBU is an organization which unites skilled and unskilled workers. They believed that by standing together, workers could force employers to pay higher wages and establish shorter working hours. It was a battle against OBU and the employers.
  • One Big Union (continue)

    One Big Union (continue)
    Employer were not listening to their employees demands so Trades and Labour Congress (TLC) and Western Unionists came together in Calgary and resolved it by establishing OBU. This was socially bad because there was no unity and trust between employers and employees. There was labour unrest in Canada. It was economically bad too because all the people were in strike. Canada blacked out. Nobody was working and all the employees were out in the streets protesting so they can get their voice heard.
  • One Big Union (continue #2)

    One Big Union (continue #2)
    This was socially good because skilled and unskilled workers united against one cause. Better wages, better working conditions, and eight hours of daily work. This politically bad too because this created a threat for the employers. Employers saw that skilled and unskilled workers came together as OBU and guessed that something big was about to happen. Winnipeg General Strike took place. Left: Skilled and Un-skilled workers unitng together.