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His 30 Timeline Challenge BarsaSelina

  • Fort Rouille

    Fort Rouille
    Colonies and Settlements
    Fort Rouille was established in Toronto, Ontario in 1750. Its construction was ordered by Marquis de la Jonquière, Governor of New France, to establish a French presence in the area and to attract aboriginal traders travelling towards a British fur-trading post.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1750's

  • Halifax Gazette

    Halifax Gazette
    Notable Events
    On March 23, 1752, the first newspaper, Halifax Gazette, was issued in Canada by John Bushell, a printer from Boston. The early newspapers depended on government fundings for revenue. Their content consisted of government announcements and foreign news. Advertisements were small and ranged from property for sale to general store commodities. Early news sheets rarely contained more than four pages, and publication was usually once a week.
  • Anthony Henday's Journey into Western Canada

    Anthony Henday's Journey into Western Canada
    Exploration Discovery
    In the year 1754, Anthony Henday travelled farther into western Canada than any white person had before him, and his journal contained important glimpses of how the indigenous population lived at that time. He travelled with some Cree and along his journey, traded and collected fur from the Aboriginals.
  • French and Indian War

    French and Indian War
    Wars and Battles
    The French and Indian War was fought between colonies of British America and New France in 1754. However, it was officially declared two years later. Both the British and French wanted to extend their North American colonies into the land west of the Appalachian Mountains. This resulted in a dispute and a war that was fought fought along the frontiers between New France and the British colonies, from Virginia in the South to Nova Scotia in the North.
  • Cause & Consequence - French and Indian War

    Cause= Both the British and French wanted to expand their colonies. This resulted in a dispute and eventually led to war.
    Consequence= Due to the costs of the war, Britain was in debt. The French lost all their possessions in North America. On the other hand, the British expanded their colonies as they won the war.
  • Battle of Restigouche

    Battle of Restigouche
    Wars and Battles
    The Battle of Restigouche was the last battle between the French and the British during the Seven Years’ War in 1760. It was a naval battle fought on the Restigouche River. The French lost making this their last serious attempt to hold their colonies in North America.
  • Primary Source of Evidence - Battle of Restigouche

    Primary Source of Evidence - Battle of Restigouche
  • Period: to

    British and French Relations in Canadian History

  • Treaty of Paris

    Treaty of Paris
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The Treaty of Paris was signed on February 10, 1763, by France, Britain and Spain. It marked the end of the Seven Years’ War. By the terms of the treaty, New France became a British colony called Quebec and Britain obtained French possessions.
  • James Murray Becomes the Governor of Quebec

    James Murray Becomes the Governor of Quebec
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    General James Murray became the Governor of Quebec on 4 October, 1763. He favoured French-Canadians more, over British merchants. Since the French outnumbered the British in Quebec, he allowed French Civil Law as to not ignite a rebellion. However, this was disliked by the British merchants.
  • Formation of Prince Edward Island (St. John's Island)

    Formation of Prince Edward Island (St. John's Island)
    Colonies and Settlements
    Great Britain obtained the island from France under the terms of the Treaty of Paris in 1763 which settled the Seven Years' War. The British named their new colony St. John's Island on June 28, 1769 which later was changed to Prince Edward Island.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1770's

  • Migration of Scottish Settlers to Nova Scotia

    Migration of Scottish Settlers to Nova Scotia
    Colonies and Settlements
    Mr. John Pagan, owner of a famous vessel called Hector bought three shares of land near Pictou, Nova Scotia. He hired John Ross as an agent to recruit settlers willing to immigrate to Pictou with an offer of free passage, 1 year of free provisions, and a farm. In 1773, 189 Scottish settlers migrated to Nova Scotia aboard Hector.
  • Quebec Act

    Quebec Act
    Qubec Act Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The Quebec Act was passed on 22 June, 1774, by the British Parliament. The act guaranteed religious and language rights to French Canadians. The French Civil Law and Roman Catholicism was practiced in Quebec and, its territories were expanded too. This was the last tolerable act for the Americans and eventually led to American Revolution.
  • Cause and Consequence - Qubec Act

    Cause= The British Parliament passed the Quebec Act in order to please the French-Canadians who resided in Quebec and to prevent a rebellion from arising.
    Consequence= The Americans became angry as Act established Catholicism as the state religion in Quebec. This was one of the reasons that led to the start of the American Revolution. Some english-speaking immigrants in Quebec weren’t happy with this decision either.
  • Battle of Quebec

    Battle of Quebec
    Wars and Battles
    The American force entered Montreal on 13 November under command of General Richard Montgomery, in hopes of driving away the troops of Great Britain.The Battle of Quebec began when Montgomery launched an assault on Quebec. It was fought on December 31, 1775, between American Continental Army forces and the British defenders of Quebec City. However, under leadership of Sir Guy Carleton, the Governor of Quebec, the British won the battle.
  • James Cook's Expedition

    James Cook's Expedition
    Exploration Discovery
    In 1778, Captain James Cook explored the Pacific Coast from Nootka, Vancouver Island, to the Bering Strait. On March 29, Cook claimed Nootka Sound for the British, and, on April 26, claimed Vancouver Island.
  • Period: to

    Effects of Loyalist Population in Canada

  • Loyalist Immigration to Canada

    Loyalist Immigration to Canada
    Colonies and Settlements
    In 1783, thousands of United Empire Loyalists were evicted from the United States because they were American colonists of British, Dutch, Irish, Scottish and other origins, who were still loyal to the King during the American Revolution. They immigrated to Canada and mostly settled in Nova Scotia. Because of the lack of job opportunities, thousands of Loyalists set out westward, eventually settling all along the northern shores of Lake Ontario all the way to Niagara.
  • Cause and Consequence - Loyalist Immigration to Canada

    Cause= The Loyalists were evicted because they were still loyal to the King after immigrating to the United States.
    Consequence= They immigrated to Canada, populated the area very quickly, and led to the formation of separate provinces in order to accommodate them.
  • Formation of New Brunswick

    Formation of New Brunswick
    Provincial Notes
    By 1784, the population of Loyalists in Nova Scotia grew immensely. As a result, Nova Scotia was partitioned and the province of New Brunswick was formed on 16 August, 1784.
  • Provincial Academy of Arts and Sciences in Fredericton

    Provincial Academy of Arts and Sciences in Fredericton
    Notable Events
    In 1785, a petition titled as "The Founders' Petition of 1785," was made for the purpose of requesting the establishment of a school, by the Loyalists. This resulted in the establishment of the Provincial Academy of Arts and Sciences in Fredericton which was later named the University of New Brunswick.
  • Alexander Mackenzie's Expedition to find the Northwest Passage

    Alexander Mackenzie's Expedition to find the Northwest Passage
    Exploration Discovery
    Under the sponsorship of the North West Company, Alexander Mackenzie set out in a voyage in the hopes of finding the Northwest Passage to Pacific Ocean on July 10, 1789. He ended up reaching the Arctic Ocean on 14 July. It was supposed that he named the river "Disappointment River" as a result of his failure. The river was later renamed the Mackenzie River in his honour.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1790's

  • Formation of Upper and Lower Canada

    Formation of Upper and Lower Canada
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    Quebec was being populated with thousands of English-speaking Loyalists. To accommodate them, Quebec was divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada when the Constitutional Act took effect on 26 December, 1791. Upper Canada received English law and institutions, while Lower Canada kept French civil law and institutions.
  • George Vancouver's Voyages

    George Vancouver's Voyages
    Exploration Discovery
    In 1792, George Vancouver started summer voyages to explore the coast of mainland British Columbia and Vancouver Island.
  • Primary Source of Evidence - George Vancouver's Voyages

    Primary Source of Evidence - George Vancouver's Voyages
  • York Becomes Capital of Upper Canada

    York Becomes Capital of Upper Canada
    Provincial Notes
    In 1793, Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe established York. Initially, York was considered as a temporary location for the capital of Upper Canada. Simcoe’s intended to build the capital at London, Ontario. However, he gave up his plan and York became the permanent capital of Upper Canada on February 1, 1796.
  • David Thompson Joins the North West Company

    David Thompson Joins the North West Company
    Notable Events
    After working 13 years for the Hudson’s Bay Company, David Thompson joined the North West Company in 1797, as a surveyor and mapmaker. He surveyed and mapped thousands of square miles of western North America.
  • Lake Trade in the 1800's

    Lake Trade in the 1800's
    Colonies and Settlements
    Lake trade starts to expand. By 1817 up to twenty merchant vessels will be on Lake Erie. During the 1800s, Lake Erie provided a quick means of transportation for men engaged in the fur trade as well as settlers.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during 1800's

  • XY Company is Absorbed by The NorthWest Company.

    XY Company is Absorbed by The NorthWest Company.
    Notable Events
    After years of competition with the smaller company the NorthWest Company finally absorbs the XY company.
  • Abolishment of Slave Trade And Consequences

    Abolishment of Slave Trade And Consequences
    Document Acts and Treaties
    Cause: On March 25, 1807 the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act was enacted in all British colonies. However this wasn't an abolishment of slavery in itself; just of the trading of enslaved people.
    Consequence: There is suspicion that some slave ships that were in danger of being captured by the Royal Navy, in fear of the fines they would have to pay, ordered the slaves to be thrown the sea. thousands of enslaved people may have been killed in this time
  • Simon Fraser

    Simon Fraser
    Exploration Discovery
    Simon Fraser travels the Fraser River 1360 km to reach the Pacific Ocean on July 2nd, 1808.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1810's

  • Hudson Bay Settlement

    Hudson Bay Settlement
    Colonies and Settlements
    Lord Selkirk plans a settlement of Highlands Scots in Red River area, near the present day Winnipeg. In the fall of 1811 the first settlers arrive at Hudson Bay.
  • The War Of 1812

    The War Of 1812
    Wars and Battles
    On June 18th, 1812 America declared war on Britain. The Napoleonic Wars had caused Britain to enact measures that greatly aggravated America. As a colony of Great Britain, Canada was swept up into the war and was invaded a number of times by the Americans.
  • The Treaty of Ghent-Cause and Consequence

    The Treaty of Ghent-Cause and Consequence
    Documents, Acts and Treaties- The Treaty of Ghent, signed on December 24, 1814 in the city of Ghent in Belgium, was the peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States and Great Britain. By terms of the treaty, all conquered territory was to be returned, and commissions were planned to settle the boundary of the United States and Canada. Cause: of the Treaty of Ghent was the War of 1812
    Consequence: of the Treaty of Ghent was a settled boundary between Canada and the U.S.
  • Canadian Border Defined

    Canadian Border Defined
    Documents, Acts and Treaties

    Canada's Border is defined as the 49th parallel from The Lake of the Woods and The Rocky Mountains.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1820's

  • Hudson's Bay Company

    Hudson's Bay Company
    Notable Event
    The NorthWest Company is absorbed by the Hudson's Bay Company
  • The Welland Canal

    The Welland Canal
    Colonies and Settlements
    Work on the first Welland Canal begins. This work begins partially because of the Americans initiatives on the Erie Canal. The Erie Canal was completed in 1825 by the State of New York and it provided a waterway between Buffalo on Lake Erie and Albany on the Hudson River. It was the greatest single transportation factor in early settlement of the like region and growth of lake navigation.
  • Marimichi Fire

    Marimichi Fire
    Notable Event
    Miramichi Fire kills more than 160 persons and consumes 6,000 square miles of forest in New Brunswick.
  • The Beothuks and Historical Significance

    The Beothuks and Historical Significance
    Provincial Notes

    Shawnandithit, the last of the Beothuks, dies at about age twenty-eight in St. John's, Newfoundland. The Beothuks were the aboriginal people of the island of the Newfoundland. There was much tension and conflict between them and the Europeans hunted them into extinction. Historical Significance: A whole race and culture is lost forever. Their history is all we have, if we do not remember them then they might as well not existed at all.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1830's

  • The Rideau Canal

    The Rideau Canal
    Colonies and settlements-

    Colonel John By builds The Rideau Canal. The community of Bytown grows out of the camp for the canal. This community is later known as Present-day Ottawa.
  • Freedom of Press and Historical Significance

    Freedom of Press and Historical Significance
    Document, Acts and Treaties
    Reform newspaper publisher Joseph Howe's oratory wins him acquittal on a libel charge and establishes freedom of the press. This means that the press can report news as fact, as it happens, without government persuasion or bribery. This is historically significant because from this point on the press is given the freedom to publish truths to civilians without being censored, but because of this freedom the press can sometimes not be reliable.
  • The First Railway

    The First Railway
    Notable Events
    The first railway in Canada opens, running from La Prairie to St. John's, Quebec.
  • Lord Durham's Report

    Lord Durham's Report
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    In 1838, Lord Durham comes to Canada as governor. Then in 1839 Lord Durham's report strongly urges the establishment of responsible government and the union of Upper and Lower Canada to speed the assimilation of French-speaking Canadians.
  • The Aroostook War

    The Aroostook War
    Territorial disputes between lumbermen from Maine and New Brunswick leads to the Aroostook War in the Aroostook Rover Valley.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1840's

  • The Act of Union

    The Act of Union
    Document, Acts and Treaties

    The Act of Union unites Upper and Lower Canada (which became Canada West and East) into the Province of Canada, under one government, with Kingston as capital.
  • The Pulp and Paper Industry

    The Pulp and Paper Industry
    Notable Event
    Notable Events
    Charles Fenetry of Sackville, New Brunswick, discovers a practical way to make paper from wood pulp. Today the pulp and paper industry is Canada's largest manufacturing industry, and Canada exports more pulp and paper than any other country in the world.
  • Webster-Ashburton Treaty- Historical Significane

    Webster-Ashburton Treaty- Historical Significane
    Document Acts and Treaties

    Historical Significance: The Webster-Ashburton Treaty ends the Aroostook War, settling once and for all the Maine-New Brunswick border dispute.
  • Vancouver Island Founded

    Vancouver Island Founded
    Colonies and Settlements
    James Douglas of the Hudson's Bay Company founds Victoria and Vancouver Island.
  • Franklin and the Northwest Passage- Continuity and Change

    Franklin and the Northwest Passage- Continuity and Change
    Exploration Discovery
    Sir John Franklin and his crew disappear in the Arctic while searching the Northwest Passage. Continuity: Many search parties have been sent throughout the years to find out when happened to Franklin and his crew, but they continued to be missing for a over a century and a half. Change: Finally, in 2014, after much funding, a private investigation located the ship Sir Franklin is believed to have died on.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1850's

  • First Postage Stamp in Canada - Threepenny Beaver

    First Postage Stamp in Canada - Threepenny Beaver
    Provincial Notes
    On 23 April, 1851, the Province of Canada issues its first postage stamp. The stamp was recognized as the Threepenny Beaver which depicted a beaver in an oval frame.
  • Reciprocity Treaty

    Reciprocity Treaty
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    On June 5, 1854, Governor Elgin signed the Reciprocity Treaty on behalf of Great Britain. It was a trade treaty between the United and Great Britain, also applying to its possessions in North America ( United Province of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland Colony). It eliminated tariffs charged on goods exchanged between the countries and promoted free trade.
  • Fraser Canyon Gold Rush

    Fraser Canyon Gold Rush
    Fraser Canyon Gold Rush Notable Events
    The discovery of gold on the Thompson River and and Fraser River in British Columbia led to an event called the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush in 1857. After its discovery, thousands of miners rushed to the area including Chinese immigrants from California.
  • Cause and Consequence - Fraser Canyon Gold Rush

    Cause= The Loyalists were evicted because they were still loyal to the King after immigrating to the United States.
    Consequence= They immigrated to Canada, populated the area very quickly, and led to the formation of separate provinces in order to accommodate them.
  • James Douglas - First Governor of the Colony of British Columbia

    James Douglas - First Governor of the Colony of British Columbia
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    James Douglas became the first Governor of the Colony of British Columbia on 19 November, 1858. During Fraser Canyon Gold Rush, there was potential for Americans to turn B.C mainland into an American state. To prevent this from occurring, Douglas became Governor in order to maintain British authority.
  • Period: to

    Independance and Growth of Canada

  • Cornerstone of Parliament Building Laid

    Cornerstone of Parliament Building Laid
    Provincial Notes
    On September 1st, 1860, Prince of Wales laid the cornerstone of the new legislature in Ottawa. The cornerstone was made of white marble inscribed with a record of the ceremony. There was another inscription on top of the stone with the names of designer and dignitaries involved. Following the event, the construction of the Parliament building began.
  • Battle of Ridgeway

    Battle of Ridgeway
    Wars and Battles
    The Fenians began a series of raids on Canadian territory in the hopes of driving the British troops out of their homeland, Ireland. The Battle of Ridgeway was the most serious of raids. It was fought between Canadian troops and an irregular army of Irish-American invaders, the Fenians, on June 2, 1866.
  • British North America Act

    British North America Act
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The British North American Act was passed by the British government, allowing the formation of the Dominion of Canada. It consisted of four territories, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. The Act, drafted by John A. MacDonald was signed on May 8, and became effective on July 1, 1867. Henceforth, Canada became a domestically self-governing federation.
  • John A. MacDonald Becomes the First Prime Minister of Canada

    John A. MacDonald Becomes the First Prime Minister of Canada
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    John A. MacDonald was a Canadian politician from 1 January 1815 to 6 June 1891. He was also one of the Fathers of Confederation. On July 1st, 1867, John A. MacDonald became the first prime minister of Canada.
  • Historical Significance - John A. MacDonald

    John A. MacDonald played a significant role in the history of Canada. Under his leadership, Canada extended to areas it covers in the present day. He also established a policy of high tariffs to protect Canadian companies from their American rivalries. Macdonald led Canada to achieve the National Dream, a railway the entire way from eastern Canada to the West Coast.
  • Period: to

    Contributions of Prime Ministers to Canada

  • Manitoba Joins Confederation

    Manitoba Joins Confederation
    Provincial Notes
    On July 15, 1870, the province of Manitoba was formed out of the Red River Settlement. It suppressed the Red River Rebellion which resulted because the Metis ,settled there, were not being paid attention too and their need were not taken care of. Manitoba joined the Confederation and became a province of Canada.
  • Pacific Scandal

    Pacific Scandal
    Notable Events
    The Pacific Scandal erupted on April 2, 1873, when Prime Minister, John A. MacDonald was accused and eventually found guilty of taking election funds in exchange for the contract to build the Canadian Pacific Railway. Consequently, he was forced to resign on November 5, 1873.
  • Alexander Mackenzie Becomes the Second Prime Minister of Canada

    Alexander Mackenzie Becomes the Second Prime Minister of Canada
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    When MacDonald’s government fell due to the Pacific Scandal, Mackenzie was called to become the leader of the Liberal Party. On November 7, 1873, Alexander Mackenzie became the second Prime Minister of Canada after his party won the election.
  • Historical Significance - Alexander Mackenzie

    He also played a significant role in Canadian history. During his time as Prime Minister, he established the Supreme Court of Canada, established the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston in 1874, and made all attempts to continue progress on the national railway.
  • National Policy

    National Policy
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The National Policy set forth on March 12, 1879. It introduced protective tariffs, a transcontinental railway, and immigration. According to the National Policy, all imported, manufactured goods were put high tariffs on. However, tariffs on raw materials were lowered to help Canadian manufacturers.
  • Chinese Labourers Hired to Build Canadian Pacific Railway

    Chinese Labourers Hired to Build Canadian Pacific Railway
    Notable Events
    During 1880, thousands of Chinese labourers were hired by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) to lay the tracks through the Rocky Mountains. These labourers were paid low wages.
    Their work was dangerous and many died in the process, without being recognized.
  • Period: to

    Historical Events during the 1880's

  • Emily Stowe Granted a License to Practice Medicine

    Emily Stowe Granted a License to Practice Medicine
    Provincial Notes
    Emily Stowe was denied entrance to the Toronto School of Medicine in 1865 and was told the university is not open for women. Hence, she earned her degree in the United States from the New York Medical College for Women in 1867. On July 18, 1880, Emily Stowe was finally granted a license to practice medicine legally in Toronto, from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario.
  • North West Rebellion

    North West Rebellion
    Wars and Battles
    The North West Rebellion took place during 1885, with the Metis causing an uprising against the Canadian government. The Metis were lead by Louis Riel during the rebellion. It occurred because the Métis believed that Canada had failed to protect their rights, their land and their survival as a distinct people. Hence, they started a rebellion which remained unsuccessful.
  • Cause and Consequence - North West Rebellion

    Cause= When the Canadian government sent surveyors to the area, the Metis were in fear of losing their land. They petitioned for years for the claim of their land. When Metis leader, Louis Riel’s petition failed, he sent a military force to start the rebellion.
    Consequence= The Metis were defeated and Riel was arrested. He was trialed, accused guilty and hanged. Riel became a heroic martyr to French Canada. His death split the country along French and English lines.
  • Nile Expedition

    Nile Expedition
    Exploration Discovery
    The Nile Expedition was a British mission to rescue Major-General Charles Gordon, who was who was besieged at the Sudanese capital of Khartoum. Around 400 Canadians was recruited to help the British navigate their small boats up the Nile River. On January 28, 1885, the Canadian voyageurs reached Khartoum but the mission was unsuccessful because Gordon had already been killed.
  • Manitoba Schools Act

    Manitoba Schools Act
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The Manitoba Schools Act was passed in 1890 in response to the English immigrants who resented public funding for French Catholic schools. The act abolished French as an official language in the province, and eliminated state funding for Catholic Schools. As a result, all school systems were in English only.
  • Period: to

    French-Canadians and Other Historic Events during the 1890's

  • Wilfrid Laurier Becomes the First French-Canadian Prime Minister of Canada

    Wilfrid Laurier Becomes the First French-Canadian Prime Minister of Canada
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    Wilfrid Laurier became the first ever French-Canadian Prime Minister of Canada on July 11, 1896. He served for 45 years in the House of Commons and holds the record for the most consecutive federal elections won.
  • Historical Significance - Wilfrid Laurier

    Another significant man in Canadian history is Wilfred Laurier. During his time, he promoted the development and expansion of the country, encouraged immigration to Western Canada, supported the construction of another transcontinental railway, and oversaw the addition of two provinces, Alberta and Saskatchewan. He also made best efforts to unite the French and the English in Canada.
  • Formation of Yukon Territory

    Formation of Yukon Territory
    Provincial Notes
    Due to the Klondike Gold Rush, population increased immensely. This resulted in the separation of the Yukon district from the Northwest Territories and the formation of the separate Yukon Territory in 1898.
  • Boer War

    Boer War
    Wars and Battles
    The Boer War was fought between Great Britain and two small republics in South Africa. On October 30, 1899, the first Canadian troops were sent overseas to participate in the war in South Africa. Around seven thousand Canadians volunteered to fight on the British side.
  • The Radio

    The Radio
    Notable Events
    Canadian born Reginald Fessenden transmitted the world's first wireless spoken message by radio in 1900. Then six years later he transmited the world's first two-way voice transmission. He is credited with the discovery of the super-heterodyne principle which is the basis of all modern broadcasting.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1900's

  • Formation of Alberta and Saskatchewan

    Formation of Alberta and Saskatchewan
    Provincial Notes
    Haultain and Ross, member of the territorial legislature, drew up a bill to unify the districts of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Assiniboia and Athabasca into one large western province. After further negotiations, it was decided that the proposed province would be too big, and so it was split into Alberta and Saskatchewan.Two new provinces, Alberta and Saskatchewan joined Confederation when the Alberta Act and the Saskatchewan Act came into effect on 1 September 1905.
  • Robert Stanley Weir Wrote 'O Canada'.

    Robert Stanley Weir Wrote 'O Canada'.
    In 1908, Robert Stanley Weir wrote the English lyrics for 'O Canada'. This was the most popular version of the song, which later became officially became Canada's national anthem in 1980.
  • The Boundary Waters Treaty

    The Boundary Waters Treaty
    Documents and treaties- The Boundary Waters Treaty between Canada and United States creates the International Joint Commission, which first mission was to investigate the pollution of the Great Lakes in 1912. Its research and advocacy led to the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement in 1972.
  • Claiming The High Arctic and Historical Significance

    Claiming The High Arctic and Historical Significance
    Exploration Discovery
    Joseph-Elzear Bernier affirms Canadian sovereignty in the High Artic by erecting a plaque on Melville Island. Historical Significance: This can prove to be an important argument in the future when debate arises between Russia and Canada over who owns the land as the ice continues to melt.
  • Period: to

    Changes and Casualities in Canada during the 1910's

  • Sinking of the Titanic

    Sinking of the Titanic
    Provincial Notes
    White Star Liner, Titanic, sank off the coast of Newfoundland on April 12. Canadian ships hired out of Halifax were sent to recover bodies. Halifax became a temporary 'morgue' and many victims were buried in cemeteries created by White Star, who also set up a fund for future up-keep.
  • Sinking of the Canadian Pacific Ship

    Sinking of the Canadian Pacific Ship
    Notable Events
    The Canadian Pacific ship, the Empress of Ireland, sank in the St. Lawrence River with a loss of over 1,000 lives on May 29. Having been in collision with another ship during dense fog, the Empress sank within 15 minutes. Most casualties drowned in the frigid waters within swimming distance of shore. The
    tragedy was overshadowed by the sinking of the Titanic two years earlier and was virtually lost in history of Halifax's Role in the Titanic Tragedy.
  • Wartime Elections Act

    Wartime Elections Act
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The Wartime Elections Act of 1917 gave the vote to female relatives of Canadian soldiers serving overseas in the First World War. It also took the vote away from many Canadians who had immigrated from "enemy" countries. The Act was passed by Prime Minister Robert Borden’s Conservative government in an attempt to gain votes in the 1917 election.
  • War at Homefront

    War at Homefront
    Wars and Battles
    On December 6, a munitions ship in Halifax Harbour exploded, level 3.2 square kilometres (2 square miles) of Halifax and killing almost 2,000 people and injuring others. Due to the costs of World War I, PM Borden intrduced Income Tax as a temporaray war-time measure. Also enacted was the Wartime Elections Act.
  • Wartime Elections Act- Historical Significance

    Historical significance: Prime Minister Robert did this in hope that this would give him more votes and so there would be more support for conscription. In the vote, some 500,000 women participated for the first time. The Act was done away with after the war. By 1918, though, all women born in Canada over 21 were given the permanent right to vote in Federal Elections. This was a great step towards gender equality.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1920's

  • Group of Seven

    Group of Seven
    Provincial Notes
    The first exhibit of the Group of Seven appeared in the Art Gallery of Toronto on May 7, 1920. They were a group of Canadian landscape painters whose work can still be found at the Gallery in Ontario.
  • BNA Act - Effect of Women

    BNA Act - Effect of Women
    Documents, Acts and Treaties
    In 1928, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the British North America Act did not define women as 'persons'. This ruling made women ineligible to hold public office.
  • British Privy Council Declared Women as Persons

    British Privy Council Declared Women as Persons
    Notable Events
    The British Privy Council reversed the Supreme Court decision of 1928 and legally declared women as 'persons under the law' on October 18, 1929. This happened only due to the efforts of Emily Murphy and four other prominent Alberta women's rights activists, now known as the Famous Five. Historical Significance: After this event, women were eligible to become Members of the Senate and were finally legally valued as a person.
  • Great Depression

    Great Depression
    Notable Events
    The Great Depression began: the common belief is that the Great Depression was triggered by the 1929 crash of the stock market. During this period, many companies closed, umemployment rates rose and Canada became heavily dependent on raw material and farm exports, due to the drought.
  • Period: to

    Historic Events during the 1930's

  • Dionne Quintuplets Were Born

    Dionne Quintuplets Were Born
    Notable Events
    The Dionne quintuplets were born in May in Callander, Ontario. The wonder of five little girls being born in a single birth helped take people's minds off the grimness of the depression. Over three million people came to look at them and several books and films have since pointed out how they were exploited for the profit of others.
  • Provincial Notes - "On-to-Ottawa" Trek

    Provincial Notes - "On-to-Ottawa" Trek
    The "On-to-Ottawa" trek began in Vancouver by men from the relief camps of B.C. They jumped on freight trains, planning to make their way across the country to Ottawa, where they wanted to protest the government's use of relief camps or "slave camps" as they called them. Their leader was Arthur "Slim" Evans. When the trekkers reached Regina in June they were stopped by police and only Evans and a few others were allowed to go on to Ottawa. When Evans was later arrested, riots broke out in Regina
  • Relief camps- Cause and Consequence

    Cause: During the Great Depression many men were left unemployed. To eleviate this problem the government made "relief camps" for unemployed men to work at.
    Consequence: The relief camps were all in terrible conditions. The men worked streneous hours with little to no pay and were were hardly given enough to pass by. This resulted in death for some of the overworked men.
  • World War Two

    World War Two
    The main countries involved were the Axis power; Germany, Italy, and Japan. And the Allies; France, Great Britain, the United States, the Soviet Union, and, to a lesser extent, China. The war was in many respects a continuation, after an uneasy 20-year hiatus, of the disputes left unsettled by World War I. Hitler and the rest of Germany, because of bitter feelings over the Versailles Treaty, disregarded it and in a sense forced us to act.
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    Historic Events during the 1940's

  • Conscription

    Conscription
    Document Acts and Treaties Parliament passes the controversial National Resources Mobilization Act. This allows conscription for military service In Canada. (Cause and Consequence*)
  • The Dieppe Raid

    The Dieppe Raid
    Wars and Battles
    The Dieppe raid, Canada's first participation in World War Two, is a disaster. The raid in Dieppe, France leaves, 900 out of 5 000 Canadians dead and almost 2 000 taken prisoner.
  • The Cold War

    The Cold War
    Wars and Battles
    In 1945, World War Two ends but immediately after the Cold War begins. The Cold War was mainly between the U.S. and the Soviet Union but Canada was also involved.
  • The Cold War- Cause and Consequence

    Cause: Tension started to rise at the Potsdam Conference They were discussing the realignment of Europe. Threats were thrown between the two. There Pres. Truman revealed his master card; the atomic bomb. Wanting to counter this the Soviet Union started to make their own bomb.
    Consequence: After seeing the destruction from the atomic bomb in Japan people became afraid of Nuclear War (complete destruction). So no direct attack was made. The tension continued until the fall of the Soviet Union.
  • The Income Tax Act

    The Income Tax Act
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    The Income Tax Act is enacted by Sir Robert Borden. After numerous amendments to the Income War Tax Act introduced in 1917, the new act largely reworded and codified the former law with little change in actual policy. We pay the income tax to this very day.
  • Korean War

    Korean War
    Wars and Battles
    In 1950, volunteers in the Canadian Army Special Force joined the United Nation forces in the Korean War. Twenty-six thousand Canadians participated in the war and around eight hundred were killed. During the war, Canadian aircrafts provided transport and supplies. After the war, Canadian troops remained there for three years as military observers.
  • Primary Source of Evidence - Korean War

    Primary Source of Evidence - Korean War
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    Historic Events during the 1950's

  • Vincent Massey Becomes the First Canadian-born Governor General

    Vincent Massey Becomes the First Canadian-born Governor General
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    In 1952, Vincent Massey became the first Canadian-born Governor General by appointment of Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent.
  • Hurricane Hazel Hits Toronto

    Hurricane Hazel Hits Toronto
    Provincial Notes
    Hurricane Hazel hit Toronto on October 15, 1954 with 178 millimetres of rain. Eighty-three people died during the event. Streets in west Toronto were destroyed and many bridges were washed away in the worst inland storm of Canada.
  • First UN Emergency Force (UNEF)

    First UN Emergency Force (UNEF)
    Notable Events
    The Suez Crisis arose in 1956 when Egypt was invaded by Israel, followed by Britain and France. To neutralize this situation, future Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson suggested the creation of a multinational peacekeeping force to the United Nations. They agreed and the First UN Emergency Force (UNEF), lead by Canadian troops, entered the Suez and brought it to a successful and peaceful end.
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    French-Canadians and other Historic Events during the 1960's

  • Jean Lesage Becomes the Premier of Quebec

    Jean Lesage Becomes the Premier of Quebec
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    On June 22, 1960, Jean Lesage became the Premier of Quebec after his Liberal government won the Quebec general election. This eventually gave rise to the Quiet Revolution. During Lesage’s rule, he established Hydro-Quebec which transmitted and supplied electricity to the entire province of Quebec. His government also took control over the fields of health care and education, which had previously been in the hands of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • Saskatchewan Becomes the First Province to Have Medical Insurance

    Saskatchewan Becomes the First Province to Have Medical Insurance
    Provincial Notes
    Premier of Saskatchewan, Thomas Douglas, implemented a system of government-funded health insurance on July 1, 1962. Saskatchewan became the first province to have medical insurance covering doctor’s bills in Canada. This ultimately led to a strike by doctors who weren’t pleased with the decision.
  • Maple Leaf Inaugurated

    Maple Leaf Inaugurated
    Notable Events
    On February 15, 1965, the new red and white flag of Canada, the Maple Leaf, was inaugurated. It was designed by George Stanley and replaced the previous flag of Canada, the Royal Union Flag.
  • Official Languages Act

    Official Languages Act
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The Official Languages Act came into effect on September 9, 1969. Thereafter, both English and French were recognized as official languages by the federal government. Both languages became equal in Canada's government and in all the services it controls, such as the courts.
  • Continuity and Change - Official Languages Act

    Before the Act was passed, English was the only official language in Canada. This made communication difficult for French-speaking Canadians. The Act made two languages, English and French, official in Canada, hence pleasing all Canadians. The French language was given recognition and is still in use in present-day Canada.
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    Historic Events during the 1970's

  • Voting Age Lowered- Historical Significance

    Voting Age Lowered- Historical Significance
    Documents, Acts and Treaties
    Voting age is lowered from 21 years of age to 18 years of age.
    Historical Significance: This opens up a whole new group of voters, with a bunch of different needs in a government. Unfortuntely not many young ones take advantage of the privledge anymore.
  • The October Crisis

    The October Crisis
    FLQ is a national liberation movement. Its goal was to achieve Quebec independence by resorting to terrorism. After several bombing attempts, particularly in 1968 and 1969, the FLQ kidnapped a British diplomat, James Richard Cross, on October 5, 1970, and a provincial minister, Pierre Laporte, on October 10. On October 16, Prime Minister Trudeau enacted the War Measures Act. On Oct. 17, Laporte's body was found. The Roses, Simard, and Lortie were charged in 1971 with kidnapping and murder
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    The October Crisis

    FLQ is a national liberation movement. Its goal was to achieve Quebec independence by resorting to terrorism. After several bombing attempts, particularly in 1968 and 1969, the FLQ kidnapped a British diplomat, James Richard Cross, on October 5, 1970, and a provincial minister, Pierre Laporte, on October 10. On October 16, Prime Minister Trudeau enacted the War Measures Act. On Oct. 17, Laporte's body was found. The Roses, Simard, and Lortie were charged in 1971 with kidnapping and murder.
  • Satellites

    Satellites
    Notable Events
    Anik Geostationary Commercial Satellite is launched by Telesat. This makes Canada the first country in the world to use satellites for domestic communication.
  • CN Tower

    CN Tower
    Provincial Notes
    Toronto's CN Tower becomes the world's tallest free-standing structure.
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    Historic Events during the 1980's

  • Terry Fox and Historical Significance

    Terry Fox and Historical Significance
    Notable Event Terry Fox begins his cross-country run, the "Marathon of Hope". On Sept. 1 he is forced to stop when his cancer returns. Historical Significance: To this day we still have the Terry Fox run and the fundraiser has raised millions of dollars for Cancer and cancer research. He had managed to raise 25 million dollars before he died.
  • A New Constitution

    A New Constitution
    Document Acts and Treaties Canada gains a new Constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
  • Canadian Dollar

    Canadian Dollar
    The Canadian dollar hits an all time low of 70.2. U.S. cents on international money markets. We are almost there now in 2015 with the Canadian dollar at 70.4. U.S. cents.
  • David See-Chai Lam

    David See-Chai Lam
    Governors and Prime Ministers David See-Chai Lam, born in Hong Kong, becomes British Columbia's Lietenant-governor.
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    Historic Events during the 1990's

  • Goods and Services Tax

    Goods and Services Tax
    Documents, Acts & Treaties
    The Goods and Services Tax (GST) became effective on January 1, 1991. The tax was introduced by Brian Mulroney’s Conservative government and is defined in law at Part IX of the Excise Tax Act. It applied to most goods and services purchased in Canada by retailers and consumers. The 7 percent tax replaced the 13.5 percent manufacturer’s tax.
  • Primary Source of Evidence - Goods and Services Tax

    Primary Source of Evidence - Goods and Services Tax
  • Kim Campbell Becomes the First Female Prime Minister

    Kim Campbell Becomes the First Female Prime Minister
    Governors and Prime Ministers
    On June 25, 1993, Kim Campbell, the new leader of the Conservative party, became the first female Prime Minister of Canada. However, her time as Prime Minister only lasted for two months. She was also the first female Minister of Justice.
  • Ice Storm

    Ice Storm
    Notable Events
    The most destructive and disruptive ice storm in Canadian history drops close to one hundred millimetres of freezing rain in some areas of central and eastern Canada, affecting nearly 20 percent of Canada's population, mainly in Montreal and Ottawa. Jan. 4-9, 1998