history

  • Massacre at Mystic

    Massacre at Mystic
    Connecticut colonists under Captain John Mason and their Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to the Pequot Fort near the Mystic River.
  • The Scalp Act

    The Scalp Act
    On April 8, 1756, Governor Robert Morris enacted the Scalp Act. Anyone who brought in a male scalp above age of 12 would be given 150 pieces of eight, ($150), for females above age of 12 or males under the age of 12, they would be paid $130. The act turned all the tribes against the Pennsylvania legislature.
  • The Boston Tea Party

    The Boston Tea Party
    The Boston Tea Party was a political protest that occurred on December 16, 1773, at Griffin's Wharf in Boston, Massachusetts. American colonists, frustrated and angry at Britain for imposing “taxation without representation,” dumped 342 chests of tea, imported by the British East India Company into the harbor.
  • The Battles of Lexington and Concord

    The Battles of Lexington and Concord
    marked the start of the American War of Independence.The battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War. The battles were fought on April 19, 1775 in Middlesex County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, within the towns of Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Menotomy , and Cambridge.
  • The Battles of Lexington and Concord

    The Battles of Lexington and Concord
    marked the start of the American War of Independence.The battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War. The battles were fought on April 19, 1775 in Middlesex County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, within the towns of Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Menotomy , and Cambridge.
  • The Declaration of Independence is Signed

    The Declaration of Independence is Signed
    it gave us independence. Congress members signed the declaration. Not every man who had been present on July 4 signed the declaration on August 2. Two important officials passed up the chance to sign and others were added later. The first and largest signature was that of the president of the Congress, John Hancock.
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    The Valley Forge

    It was important because hundreds died from disease. However, the suffering troops were held together by loyalty to the Patriot cause and to General Washington, who stayed with his men.
  • The Winter at Valley Forge

    The Winter at Valley Forge
    On December 19, 1777, commander of the Continental Army George Washington, the future first president of the United States, leads his beleaguered troops into winter quarters at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.
  • Benedict Arnold turns traitor

    Benedict Arnold turns traitor
    On September 21, 1780, Revolutionary War hero Benedict Arnold turned his back on his country in a secret meeting with a top British official. So how did Arnold, with his patriot's pedigree, become the most hated man in America?
  • The Battle of Cowpens

    The Battle of Cowpens
    The Battle of Cowpens was an engagement during the American Revolutionary War fought on January 17, 1781 near the town of Cowpens, South Carolina, between U.S. forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan and British forces under Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton, as part of the campaign in the Carolinas
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    The battle of Yorktown

    The outcome in Yorktown, Virginia marked the conclusion of the last major battle of the American Revolution and the start of a new nation's independence. It also cemented Washington's reputation as a great leader and eventual election as first president of the United States
  • The 3/5ths Compromise

    The 3/5ths Compromise
    It was part of a provision of the original Constitution that dealt with how to allot seats in the House of Representatives and dole out taxes based on population. State populations would be determined by “the whole Number of free Persons” and “three fifths of all other Persons.”
  • The Constitution is Ratified

    The Constitution is Ratified
    The ratifying conventions served the necessary function of informing the public of the provisions of the proposed new government. They also served as forums for proponents and opponents to articulate their ideas before the citizenry. Significantly, state conventions, not Congress, were the agents of ratification.
  • Presidential Inauguration of George Washington

    Presidential Inauguration of George Washington
    its was our country’s first presidential election. The first inauguration of George Washington as the first president of the United States was held on Thursday, April 30, 1789 on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, New York. The inauguration was held nearly two months after the beginning of the first four-year term of George Washington as President.
  • Washington’s Farewell Address

    Washington’s Farewell Address
    he was retired from his public service.The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the executive government of the United States being not far distant, and the time actually arrived when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprise you of the resolution I have formed, to decline.
  • The Death of George Washington

    The Death of George Washington
    He was the first president. On the evening of December 14, 1799, at Mount Vernon, George Washington passed away of a throat infection. He was buried four days later in the family vault at Mount Vernon.
  • Election Day, 1800

    Election Day, 1800
    First election where both parties ran candidates and actually campaigned. There was a tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr. Because of the election of 1800, the 12th Amendment was passed, making the ElectoralCollege simpler.
  • Marbury vs. Madison

    Marbury vs. Madison
    legal case in which, on February 24, 1803, the U.S. Supreme Court first declared an act of Congress unconstitutional
  • Slave Trade Ends in the United States

    Slave Trade Ends in the United States
    the U.S. officially banned the importation of slaves. This month, we've been marking the bicentennial of that event by talking about new scholarship on slavery and the world the slaves made. Today, we want to look at the abolition of the slave trade itself.
  • Battle of Tippecanoe

    Battle of Tippecanoe
    The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought between American soldiers and Native American warriors along the banks of the Keth-tip-pe-can-nunk, a river in the heart of central Indiana.
  • The USS Constitution defeats the HMS Guerriere

    The USS Constitution defeats the HMS Guerriere
    USS Constitution vs HMS Guerriere was a battle between the two ships during the War of 1812, approximately 400 miles southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia. It took place shortly after war had broken out, exactly one month after the first engagement between British and American forces.
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    The Battle of Baltimore

    The Battle of Baltimore was a sea/land battle fought between British invaders and American defenders in the War of 1812. American forces repulsed sea and land invasions off the busy port city of Baltimore, Maryland, and killed the commander of the invading British forces.
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    The Battle of New Orleans

    The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 between the British Army under Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army under Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson, roughly 5 miles southeast of the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the current suburb of Chalmette, Louisiana.
  • The Missouri Compromise

    The Missouri Compromise
    this so-called Missouri Compromise drew a line from east to west along the 36th parallel, dividing the nation into competing halves—half free, half slave. The House passed the compromise bill on March 2, 1820. The next day, pro-slavery advocates in the House moved to reconsider the vote.
  • 13th Amendment

    13th Amendment
    The 2012 film Lincoln told the story of President Abraham Lincoln and the final month of debate over the Thirteenth Amendment, leading to its passage by the House of Representatives on January 31, 1865.
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    The Election of Andrew Jackson

    The 1828 United States presidential election was the 11th quadrennial presidential election. It was held from Friday, October 31 to Tuesday, December 2, 1828. It featured a rematch of the 1824 election, as President John Quincy Adams of the National Republican Party faced Andrew Jackson of the Democratic Party.
  • Indian Removal Act

    Indian Removal Act
    Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, beginning the forced relocation of thousands of Native Americans in what became known as the Trail of Tears.
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    Trail of Tears

    The Trail of Tears was part of a series of forced displacements of approximately 60,000 Native Americans between 1830 and 1850 by the United States government known as the Indian removal.
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    Nat Turner Rebellion

    a rebellion of enslaved Virginians that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, in August 1831, led by Nat Turner. The rebels killed between 55 and 65 people, at least 51 of whom were white.
  • The Battle of the Alamo

    The Battle of the Alamo
    The Battle of the Alamo was a pivotal event in the Texas Revolution. Following a 13-day siege, Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna reclaimed the Alamo Mission near San Antonio de Béxar, killing most of the Texians and Tejanos inside.
  • Mexico loses California, New Mexico, and Arizona

    Mexico loses California, New Mexico, and Arizona
    This treaty, signed on February 2, 1848, ended the war between the United States and Mexico. By its terms, Mexico ceded 55 percent of its territory, including parts of present-day Arizona, California, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, Nevada, and Utah, to the United States.
  • The Fugitive Slave Act

    The Fugitive Slave Act
    Passed on September 18, 1850 by Congress, The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was part of the Compromise of 1850. The act required that slaves be returned to their owners, even if they were in a free state. The act also made the federal government responsible for finding, returning, and trying escaped slaves.
  • Dred Scott Decision

    Dred Scott Decision
    was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court in which the Court held that the United States Constitution was not meant to include American citizenship
  • The Dead Rabbits Riot

    The Dead Rabbits Riot
    The Dead Rabbits riot was a two-day civil disturbance in New York City evolving from what was originally a small-scale street fight
  • Abraham Lincoln Elected President

    Abraham Lincoln Elected President
    The 1860 United States presidential election was the 19th quadrennial presidential election, held on November 6, 1860.
  • South Carolina secedes from the United Statesv

    South Carolina secedes from the United Statesv
    Charleston Mercury on November 3, 1860. South Carolina became the first state to secede from the federal Union on December 20, 1860.
  • The First Battle of Bull Run

    The First Battle of Bull Run
    The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the Battle of First Manassas, was the first major battle of the American Civil War. The battle was fought on July 21, 1861, in Prince William County, Virginia, just north of the city of Manassas and about 30 miles west-southwest of Washington, D.C.
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation
    President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free."
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    The Battle of Gettysburg

    The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.
  • The Treaty at Appomattox Courthouse

    The Treaty at Appomattox Courthouse
    The Battle of Appomattox Court House, fought in Appomattox County, Virginia, on the morning of April 9, 1865, was one of the last battles of the American Civil War.
  • The Ku Klux Klan is Established

    The Ku Klux Klan is Established
    The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) is an American white supremacist terrorist hate group founded in 1865.
  • 14th Amendment

    14th Amendment
    Passed by the Senate on June 8, 1866, and ratified two years later, on July 9, 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment granted citizenship to all persons "born or naturalized in the United States," including formerly enslaved people, and provided all citizens with “equal protection under the laws,”
  • John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil

    John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil
    In 1870, he established Standard Oil, which by the early 1880s controlled some 90 percent of U.S. refineries and pipelines. Critics accused Rockefeller of engaging in unethical practices, such as predatory pricing and colluding with railroads to eliminate his competitors in order to gain a monopoly in the industry
  • 15th Amendment

    15th Amendment
    ranted African American men the right to vote.The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
  • Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone

    Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone
    On March 7, 1876, 29-year-old Alexander Graham Bell receives a patent for his revolutionary new invention: the telephone. The Scottish-born Bell worked in London with his father, Melville Bell, who developed Visible Speech, a written system used to teach speaking to the deaf.
  • Battle of Little Bighorn

    Battle of Little Bighorn
    The Battle of the Little Bighorn was fought along the ridges, steep bluffs, and ravines of the Little Bighorn River, in south-central Montana on June 25-26, 1876. The combatants were warriors of the Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes, battling men of the 7th Regiment of the US Cavalry
  • The Great Oklahoma Land Race

    The Great Oklahoma Land Race
    The Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889 was the first land run into the Unassigned Lands of former Indian Territory
  • Battle of Wounded Knee

    Battle of Wounded Knee
    one of the final chapters of America's long Indian wars, the U.S. Cavalry kills 146 Sioux at Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota.
  • Plessy vs. Ferguson

    Plessy vs. Ferguson
    The U.S. Supreme Court changes history on May 18, 1896! The Court's “separate but equal” decision in Plessy v. Ferguson on that date upheld state-imposed Jim Crow laws. It became the legal basis for racial segregation in the United States for the next fifty years.
  • The sinking of the USS Maine

    The sinking of the USS Maine
    On February 15, 1898, an explosion of unknown origin sank the battleship U.S.S. Maine in the Havana, Cuba harbor, killing 266 of the 354 crew members. The sinking of the Maine incited United States' passions against Spain, eventually leading to a naval blockade of Cuba and a declaration of war.
  • J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel

    J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel
    In 1900, J.P. Morgan financed the creation of the Federal Steel Company, whom he quickly merged with Carnegie Steel Company and renamed United States Steel. The transaction for Carnegie Steel Company costed Morgan a cool $480 Million, more than the entire United States Federal Budget.
  • The Wizard of Oz (Book) is Published

    The Wizard of Oz (Book) is Published
    The Wizard of Oz was a 1902 musical extravaganza based on the 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum.
  • Ida Tarbell Publishes Her Article About Standard Oil

    Ida Tarbell Publishes Her Article About Standard Oil
    Born in Pennsylvania at the onset of the oil boom, Tarbell is best known for her 1904 book The History of the Standard Oil Company. The book was published as a series of articles in McClure's Magazine from 1902 to 1904. It has been called a "masterpiece of investigative journalism", by historian J.
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    Teddy Roosevelt Becomes President of the United States

    After Vice President Garret Hobart died in 1899, the New York state party leadership convinced McKinley to accept Roosevelt as his running mate in the 1900 election. ... Roosevelt took office as vice president in 1901 and assumed the presidency at age 42 after McKinley was assassinated the following September.
  • Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    In January 1910, over the late objections of Chinese community leaders, this hastily built immigration station was opened on the northeastern edge of Angel Island, ready to receive its first guests
  • The 16th Amendment is Passed

    The 16th Amendment is Passed
    The Sixteenth Amendment, ratified in 1913, played a central role in building up the powerful American federal government of the twentieth century by making it possible to enact a modern, nationwide income tax. Before long, the income tax would become by far the federal government's largest source of revenue.
  • The 17th Amendment is Passed

    The 17th Amendment is Passed
    In 1911, the House of Representatives passed House Joint Resolution 39 proposing a constitutional amendment for direct election of senators. ... On April 8, 1913, three-quarters of the states had ratified the proposed amendment, and it was officially included as the 17th Amendment.
  • The Adoption of the Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem

    The Adoption of the Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem
    'Star-Spangled Banner' becomes U.S. national anthem, March 3, 1931. On this day in 1931, President Herbert Hoover signed a bill designating “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the official national anthem of the United States.
  • The Empire State Building Opens

    The Empire State Building Opens
    On May 1, 1931, President Herbert Hoover officially dedicates New York City's Empire State Building, pressing a button from the White House that turns on the building's lights.
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    Battle of the Philippines

    The Battle of the Philippine Sea was a major naval battle of World War II that eliminated the Imperial Japanese Navy's ability to conduct large-scale carrier actions. It took place during the United States' amphibious invasion of the Mariana Islands during the Pacific War.
  • Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    The first Ellis Island Immigration Station officially opens on January 1, 1892, as three large ships wait to land. Seven hundred immigrants passed through Ellis Island that day, and nearly 450,000 followed over the course of that first year.
  • Ford Motor Company is Founded

    Ford Motor Company is Founded
    Ford introduced methods for large-scale manufacturing of cars and large-scale management of an industrial workforce using elaborately engineered manufacturing sequences typified by moving assembly lines;