Greece

Timeline created by fish stik team
In History
  • 1,250 BCE

    Trojan war

    Trojan war
    In Greek mythology, the Trojan War (Greek: Τρωικός Πόλεμος; Turkish: Truva Savaşı) was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta. The war is one of the most important events in Greek mythology and has been narrated through many works of Greek literature, most notably Homer's Iliad.
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  • 1,100 BCE

    Neolithic to bronze age

    Neolithic to bronze age
    The Neolithic Revolution reached Europe beginning in 7000–6500 BC when agriculturalists from the Near East entered the Greek peninsula from Anatolia by island-hopping through the Aegean Sea. The earliest Neolithic sites with developed agricultural economies in Europe dated 8500–9000 BPE are found in Greece.
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  • -847 BCE

    Middle Ages

    Middle Ages
    The history of the East Roman or Byzantine Empire is described by Byzantinist August Heisenberg as the history of "the Christianized Roman empire of the Greek nation".[14][15] The division of the empire into East and West and the subsequent collapse of the Western Roman Empire were developments that constantly accentuated the position of the Greeks in the empire and eventually allowed them to become identified with it altogether.
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  • -776 BCE

    Ancient Olympic Games

    Ancient Olympic Games
    The ancient Olympic Games were originally a festival, or celebration, of and for Zeus; events such as a footrace, a javelin contest, and wrestling matches were added later.
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  • -492 BCE

    Persian Wars

    Persian Wars
    Two major wars shaped the Classical Greek world. The Persian Wars (500–448 BC) are recounted in Herodotus's Histories. By the late 6th century BC, the Achaemenid Persian Empire ruled over all Greek city states and had made territorial gains in the Balkans and Eastern Europe proper as well. The Ionian Greek cities revolted from the Persian Empire, through a chain of events, and were supported by some of the mainland cities, eventually led by Athens.
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  • -490 BCE

    Classical Greece

    Classical Greece
    The basic unit of politics in Ancient Greece was the polis, sometimes translated as city-state. "Politics" literally means "the things of the polis" where each city-state was independent, at least in theory. Some city-states might be subordinate to others (a colony traditionally deferred to its mother city), some might have had governments wholly dependent upon others (the Thirty Tyrants in Athens was imposed by Sparta following the Peloponnesian War.
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  • -300 BCE

    Ancient Greek art

    Ancient Greek art
    Ancient Greek art stands out among that of other ancient cultures for its development of naturalistic but idealized depictions of the human body, in which largely nude male figures were generally the focus of innovation. The rate of stylistic development between about 750 and 300 BC was remarkable by ancient standards, and in surviving works is best seen in sculpture. There were important innovations in painting, which have to be essentially reconstructed due to of original survival.
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  • -267 BCE

    Hellenistic Greece

    Hellenistic Greece
    The Hellenistic period of Greek history begins with the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and ends with the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic society and culture, which remained essentially unchanged until the advent of Christianity, it did mark the end of Greek political independence.
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  • -168 BCE

    Roman Greece

    Roman Greece
    Main articles: Roman Empire, Greco-Roman world, and Roman Greece Scene of the Battle of Corinth (146 BC): last day before the Roman legions looted and burned the city of Corinth. The last day on Corinth, Tony Robert-Fleury, 1870 View of the Roman Odeon of Patras
    Militarily, Greece itself declined to the point that the Romans conquered the land (168 BC onwards), though Greek culture would in turn conquer Roman life. Although the period of Roman rule in Greece is conventionally dated.
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  • -148 BCE

    History of Sparta

    History of Sparta
    The History of Sparta describes the destiny of the ancient Dorian Greek state known as Sparta from its beginning in the legendary period to its incorporation into the Achaean League under the late Roman Republic, as Allied State, in 146 BC, a period of roughly 1000 years. Since the Dorians were not the first to settle the valley of the Eurotas River in the Peloponnesus of Greece, the preceding Mycenaean and Stone Age periods are described as well. Sparta went on to become a district.
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  • -114 BCE

    Modernization

    In the late 19th century, modernization transformed the social structure of Greece. The population grew rapidly, putting heavy pressure on the system of small farms with low productivity. Overall, population density more than doubled from 41 persons per square mile in 1829 to 114 in 1912 . One response was emigration to the United States, with a quarter million people leaving between 1906 and 1914.
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  • World War I and Greco-Turkish War

    The outbreak of World War I in 1914 produced a split in Greek politics, with King Constantine I, an admirer of Germany for neutrality while Prime Minister Eleftherios Venizelos pushed for Greece to join the Allies.[19] The conflict between the monarchists and the Venizelists sometimes resulted in open warfare and became known as the National Schism. In 1916, the Allies forced Constantine to abdicate in favor of his son Alexander and Venizelos returned as premier. At the end of the war.
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