Israel1

History of Ancient Israel

  • Sep 26, 999

    King David captures Jerusalem - 1000 BC

    King David captures Jerusalem - 1000 BC
    The greatest king of Israel, King David was chosen by the first Israelite king, Saul, to play music whenever an evil spirit took over the king. After both Saul and his son died in battle, David was made the king. During his reign, he gave the empire of Israel a sense of security, and he also captured Jerusalem, making it the capital of Israel and also bringing the Ark of the Covenant there.
  • Sep 26, 1000

    King Solomon's temple - 970 BC

    King Solomon's temple - 970 BC
    Under King Solomon's reign, a temple was built to hold the Ark of the Covenant.God is said to have pledged eternal "residence" to Solomon in the temple. This provided the Israelites with a central place for the Ark to stay and where they would experience God's presence. However, God was angered by Solomon's action when he went on to build altars to the gods of his wives. As a result, God separated the kingdom into Israel and Judah, with Jerusalem being independent from each.
  • Sep 27, 1001

    Assyrians take over - 722 BC

    Assyrians take over - 722 BC
    The kingdom of Israel eventually became so corrupt that God ordered Assyria to take over what was left. In a sense, Assyria then went on to take Israel captive. Some Israelites were sent into exile among non-Jewish people. Assyria spread the Israelites out among the nation and the Israelites are said to have lost their ethnicity as a result, thus becoming known as the "Ten Lost Tribes of Israel". This part of the kingdom became completely destroyed.
  • Sep 27, 1002

    Babylon captures Jerusalem - 586 BC

    Babylon captures Jerusalem - 586 BC
    During Judah's decline and under King Nebuchadnezzar's rule, Babylon was able to not only take over the Assyrian empire, but also capture Jerusalem. The walls of Jersualem were torn down and destroyed and the Temple was destroyed. Many people from Judah were taken into exile. However, this turn of events was seen as a punishment for Judah's idolatry. The Jewish people were able to see this and stay strong in their faith, without much help.
  • Sep 27, 1003

    King Cyrus rebuilds Jerusalem - 515 BC

    King Cyrus rebuilds Jerusalem - 515 BC
    Many years after the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem, some devoted Jews were able to return to their holy city through Cyrus, the king of Persia. King Cyrus allowed the Temple to be rebuilt in Jerusalem, which, for the second time, became the central part of the holy city for the Jews.
  • Sep 27, 1004

    Ezra sets a precedent for the Torah - 430 BC

    Ezra sets a precedent for the Torah - 430 BC
    Priest and scribe Ezra also promised to help rebuild the stories of the Jewish people. Ezra contributed to God's glorification in Genesis chapter 1, and also helped make the Torah the foundation of the nation. Ezra read from the Torah for hours in public, and the five books of Moses became a covenant for the people.
  • Sep 27, 1005

    Jewish people adapt to Hellenism - 400 BC

    Jewish people adapt to Hellenism - 400 BC
    After being under foreign rule, the Jews became exposed to many aspects of other religious traditions. In particular, Alexander the Great introduced the entire Middle East to Greek thought processes. In this way, many Jews adapted to that lifestyle, known as Hellenism. For example, they became more open to science. However, this made even some priests in Jerusalem to be skeptic of their beliefs, rather than having a complete confidence in their beliefs.
  • Sep 27, 1006

    Antiochus forces Hellenism - 170 BC

    Antiochus forces Hellenism - 170 BC
    During this time, Syria held control over Israel under the ruler Antiochus IV, an extreme Hellenistic ruler. Antiochus attempted to force Hellenism onto everyone under his reign. He got rid of the Torah and started burning copies of it, along with shaming families who followed Jewish traditions from the Torah.
  • Sep 27, 1007

    Maccabees fight for Israel - 164 BC

    Maccabees fight for Israel - 164 BC
    Also known as the family of Mattathias, the Maccabees were able to move in to Israel and help fight. Antiochus sent a group to break up the rebellion, unsuccessfully. Jersusalem was recaptured by the Maccabees and the Temple was again purified. This led to the Jewish holiday now known as Chanukah.
  • Sep 27, 1008

    Jerusalem is ruled by the Hasmonean family - 165 BC

    Jerusalem is ruled by the Hasmonean family - 165 BC
    Israel once again became centered around Jerusalem. Under Hasmonean rule, three sects of Jews were formed in Judaea: the Sadducees, the Pharisees, and the Essenes. The teachings of the Essenes are said to have emphasized discipline, obedience, spirituality, etc. despite being initially located somewhat in secret near the Dead Sea.
  • Sep 27, 1009

    Roman general Pompey takes over Judaea - 63 BC

    Roman general Pompey takes over Judaea - 63 BC
    Conflicts under Hasmonean rule led to a civil war, at which point Roman general Pompey came in from Syria and took over the country. Under Roman rule, Jews adapted the idea of being rescued from their sins and suffering, and the idea of a disaster at the end of the world in which all would be redeemed.
  • Sep 27, 1010

    The Jews believe in a Messiah - 100 BC

    The Jews believe in a Messiah - 100 BC
    After growing popularity of apocalyptic writings, the Jews acknowledged the existence of a Messiah, who would come at the end of time and bring peace. They believed that the Messiah would pick the "chosen" ones and bring Israel back and everyone would believe in Israel's God. Some believed this Messiah was Jesus, and they now followed, praised, and worshipped their Messiah.
  • Sep 27, 1011

    Jews rebel against Rome - 66 CE

    Jews rebel against Rome - 66 CE
    Anti-Roman militias known as Zealots caused the Jews to rebel against the Romans in 66 CE. Showing great bravery, many Jews were killed at the holy wall in Jerusalem. The Romans destroyed the Temple which was never rebuilt. However, a few pieces of the stone walls which were left have remained a place of pilgrimage and prayer.
  • Sep 27, 1012

    Romans take over Judaea - 132-135 CE

    Romans take over Judaea - 132-135 CE
    Jerusalem had now been completely destroyed, and the few Jews who remained were not allowed to read the Torah, follow the Sabbath, etc. Jerusalem was rebuilt as the Roman city of Aelia Capitolina, and no one was allowed to visit its rebuilding unless it was the anniversary of the Temple. Judaea was renamed Palestine and no longer had a center.