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Honors World History Timeline - Ries Moredock

  • 100

    Rome

  • 125

    Rome

  • 133

    Rome

  • 150

    Greece

  • 150

    Rome

  • 180

    Rome

  • 207

    China

  • 221

    China

  • 264

    Rome

  • 265

    Rome

  • 300

    Rome

  • 312

    Rome

  • 325

    India

  • 326

    Greece

  • 332

    Egypt

  • 338

    Greece

  • 410

    Rome

  • 431

    Greece

  • 450

    Greece

  • 450

    Rome

  • 470

    Greece

  • 476

    Rome

  • 500

    China

    Roads and canals were built to stimulate trade and agriculture
  • 509

    Rome

  • 546

    Greece

  • 594

    Greece

  • Dec 5, 600

    China

  • Dec 5, 600

    China

  • Dec 5, 621

    Greece

  • Dec 5, 700

    China

  • Dec 5, 725

    Greece

  • Dec 5, 750

    China

    Coined money was introduced, which further improved trade.
  • Dec 5, 750

    Greece

  • Dec 5, 753

    Rome

  • Dec 5, 770

    Egypt

  • Dec 5, 771

    China

  • Dec 5, 809

    China

  • Dec 5, 1000

    China

  • Dec 5, 1027

    China

  • Dec 5, 1027

    China

  • Dec 5, 1050

    China

  • Dec 5, 1150

    Greece

  • Dec 5, 1200

    Greece

  • Dec 5, 1250

    China

  • Dec 5, 1290

    Egypt

  • Dec 5, 1347

    Egypt

  • Dec 5, 1451

    Egypt

  • Dec 5, 1500

    India

  • Dec 5, 1500

    Greece

  • Egypt

  • Egypt

  • Mesopotamia

    Code of Laws, 282 codes, displayed for everyone to see(1700 BC)
  • India

  • India

  • Mesopotamia

  • Mesopotamia

  • India

  • Egypt

  • Rome

  • Rome

  • Mesopotamia

    In about 2000 B.C., nomadic warriors known as Amorites invaded Mesopotamia. Gradually, the Amorites overwhelmed the Sumerians and established their capital at Babylon, on the Euphrates River.
  • China

  • Greece

  • India

  • India

  • India

  • Egypt

  • Egypt

  • India

  • India

  • Egypt

  • India

  • India

  • Mesopotamia

    Cuneiform was made on clay tablets. This is important because it shows one of the earliest languages set up by people in that region. (2300 B.C.)
  • India

  • Mesopotamia

    About 2350 B.C., a conqueror named Sargon defeated the city-states of Sumer. Sargon led his army from Akkad a city-state north of Sumer. The Akkadians had long before adopted most aspects of Sumerian culture. Sargon’s conquests helped to spread that culture even farther, beyond the Tigris-Euphrates Valley. By taking control of both northern and southern Mesopotamia.
  • Mesopotamia

  • India

  • India

  • Mesopotamia

    New cities arose along the Fertile Crescent. People exchanged products and ideas. (2500 B.C.)
  • Mesopotamia

    From 3000 to 2000 B.C., the city-states of Sumer were almost constantly at war with one another. The weakened city-states could no longer ward off attacks from the peoples of the surrounding deserts and hills.
  • Egypt

  • India

  • Egypt

  • Mesopotamia

  • Mesopotamia

    Sumerians build several cities. The civilization of Mesopotamia grows as people settle in the area and farming and trading picks up. (3000 B.C.)
  • Mesopotamia

    Large cities appeared by 3000 BC. Structures were built of mud bricks
  • Egypt

  • Egypt

  • Egypt

  • Egypt

  • India

  • Mesopotamia

    Sumerians settle the region of Mesopotamia. The good soil in the region attracted the new settlers. (3300 B.C.)
  • Egypt

  • Mesopotamia

  • Egypt

  • Mesopotamia

    As early as 5500 BC people were farming in southern Mesopotamia. Flat, swampy region was well suited for agriculture Tigris and Euphrates rivers often flooded and left behind a fertile mud-silt.
  • India