Founding Fathers US History Class(May Update)

  • Massacre at Mystic

    Massacre at Mystic
    The Massacre took place on May 26, 1637 during the Pequot War, when colonists under Captain John Mason and their Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to the Pequot Fort
  • The Scalp Act

    The Scalp Act
    Anyone who brought in a male scalp above age of 12 would be given $150, for females above age of 12 or males under the age of 12, they would be paid $130.
  • Benedict Arnold turns traitor

    Benedict Arnold (1741-1801) was an early American hero of the Revolutionary War (1775-83) who later became one of the most infamous traitors in U.S. history after he switched sides and fought for the British
  • The Battles of Lexington and Concord

    The Battles of Lexington and Concord
    The Battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War.
  • The Battles of Lexington and Concord

    The Battles of Lexington and Concord
    The Battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War.
  • The Declaration of Independence is Signed

    The Declaration of Independence is Signed
    The Declaration of Independence was the first formal statement by a nation's people asserting their right to choose their own government. The Declaration of Independence was signed by 56 individuals
  • The Boston Tea Party

    The Boston Tea Party
    The Boston Tea Party was a political protest that occurred because Britain was imposing “taxation without representation”. American Colonists dumped 342 crates of imported tea into the harbor.
  • Winter At Valley Forge

    Winter At Valley Forge
    General Washington moved the Continental Army to their winter quarters at Valley Forge. Though Revolutionary forces had secured a p victory at Saratoga in September and October, Washington’s army suffered major defeats at Brandywine, Paoli, and Germantown, and Pennsylvania.
    This Lasted From Dec 19, 1777 – Jun 19, 1778
  • The Winter at Valley Forge

    The Winter at Valley Forge
    The particularly severe winter of 1777-1778 proved to be a great trial for the American army, and of the 11,000 soldiers stationed at Valley Forge, hundreds died from disease.
  • The Battle of Cowpens

    The Battle of Cowpens
    The Battle of Cowpens was an engagement during the American Revolutionary War fought on January 17, 1781 near the town of Cowpens, South Carolina, between U.S. forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan and British forces under Lieutenant Colonel Sir Banastre Tarleton, as part of the campaign in the Carolinas.
  • Articles of Confederation are Ratified

    Articles of Confederation are Ratified
    The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution.
  • The Battle of Yorktown

    The Battle of Yorktown
    The French Navy and the Continental Army conceived a plan to entrap Cornwallis in Yorktown. The plan was successful, Cornwallis surrendered Yorktown, and three weeks later the Siege of Yorktown was over.
    This Battle Lasted From Sep 28, 1781 – Oct 19, 1781
  • The 3/5ths Compromise

    The 3/5ths Compromise
    Agreement between the states that three-fifths of the slave population would be counted for determining direct taxation and representation in the House of Representatives.
  • The Constitution is Ratified

    The Constitution is Ratified
    These 9 States Ratified the Constitution: Delaware: December 7, 1787, Pennsylvania: December 12, 1787, New Jersey: December 18, 1787, Georgia: January 2, 1788, Connecticut: January 9, 1788, Massachusetts: February 6, 1788, Maryland: April 28, 1788, South Carolina: May 23, 1788, New Hampshire: June 21, 1788 (With this state’s ratification, the Constitution became legal.), Virginia: June 25, 1788, New York: July 26, 1788, North Carolina: November 21, 1789, Rhode Island: May 29, 1790
  • Inauguration of President George Washington

    Inauguration of President George Washington
    The first inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States was held on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, New York. The inauguration marked the commencement of the first four-year term of George Washington as President.
  • Washington's Farewell Address

    Washington's Farewell Address
    George Washington's farewell address is a letter written by himself to "friends and fellow-citizens" after 20 years of public service to the United States. He wrote it near the end of his second term of presidency before retiring to his home in Virginia.
  • The Death of George Washington

    The Death of George Washington
    George Washington passed away of a severe throat infection called Epiglottitis. He was buried four days later in the family vault at Mount Vernon.
  • Election Day: 1800

    Election Day: 1800
    he 1800 United States presidential election was the fourth presidential election. John Adams Vs Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson won. It was held from October 31 to December 3, 1800.
  • Marbury vs. Madison

    Marbury vs. Madison
    The Court found that Madison’s refusal to deliver the commission was illegal, but did not order Madison to hand over Marbury’s commission. Instead, the Court held that the provision of the Judiciary Act of 1789 enabling Marbury to bring his claim to the Supreme Court was itself unconstitutional.
  • Slave Trade Ends in the United States

    Slave Trade Ends in the United States
    Southern congressmen joined with the North in voting to abolish the African slave trade, an act that became effective January 1, 1808.
  • Battle of Tippecanoe

    Battle of Tippecanoe
    Occurred north of present-day West Lafayette, Indiana. The American army drove off the American Indians and burned Prophetstown to the ground.
  • The USS Constitution defeats the HMS Guerriere

    The USS Constitution defeats the HMS Guerriere
    On Aug. 19, 1812, two months after the start of the War of 1812, the USS Constitution commanded by Capt. Issac Hull defeated the HMS Guerriere commanded by Capt. James Richard Dacres about 600 southwest of Newfoundland
  • The Battle of Baltimore

    The Battle of Baltimore
    The Battle of Baltimore was a sea/land battle fought between British invaders and American defenders in the War of 1812.
  • The Battle of New Orleans

    The Battle of New Orleans
    The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 between the British Army under Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army under Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson, roughly 5 miles southeast of the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the current suburb of Chalmette, Louisiana.
  • The Missouri Compromise

    The Missouri Compromise
    Passed in 1820 admitting Missouri as a slave state and Maine as a free state
  • Indian Removal Act

    Indian Removal Act
    "The law authorized the president to negotiate with southern Native American tribes for their removal to federal territory west of the Mississippi River in exchange for white settlement of their ancestral lands.'
  • The Election of Andrew Jackson

    The Election of Andrew Jackson
    It was held from Friday, October 31 to Tuesday, December 2, 1828. It featured a re-match of the 1824 election, as President John Quincy Adams of the National Republican Party faced Andrew Jackson of the Democratic Party.
  • Trail of Tears

    Trail of Tears
    The Trail of Tears was a series of forced relocations of 60,000 Native Americans between 1830 and 1850 by the U.S government
  • Nat Turner Rebellion

    Nat Turner Rebellion
    A rebellion of black slaves that took place in Southampton County, Virginia
  • The Battle of the Alamo

    The Battle of the Alamo
    The Battle of the Alamo was a pivotal event in the Texas Revolution. Following a 13-day siege, Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna reclaimed the Alamo Mission near San Antonio de Béxar, killing the Texian and immigrant occupiers.
  • Mexico loses California, New Mexico, and Arizona

    Mexico loses California, New Mexico, and Arizona
    The war officially ended with the February 2, 1848, signing in Mexico of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The treaty added an additional 525,000 square miles to United States territory, including the land that makes up all or parts of present-day Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.
  • The Fugitive Slave Act

    The Fugitive Slave Act
    The act required that slaves be returned to their owners, even if they were in a free state.
  • The Dead Rabbits Riot

    The Dead Rabbits Riot
    a two-day civil disturbance in New York City evolving from what was originally a small-scale street fight between members of the Dead Rabbits and the Bowery Boys into a citywide gang war,
  • Dred Scott Decision

    Dred Scott Decision
    U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on March 6, 1857, that having lived in a free state and territory did not entitle Dred Scott to his freedom.
  • Abraham Lincoln Elected President

    Abraham Lincoln Elected President
    The 1860 United States presidential election was the 19th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 6, 1860. In a four-way contest, the Republican Party ticket of Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin emerged triumphant.
  • South Carolina secedes from the United States

    South Carolina secedes from the United States
    South Carolina became the first slave state in the south to declare that it had seceded from the United States.
  • The First Battle of Bull Run

    The First Battle of Bull Run
    The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major battle of the American Civil War and was a Confederate victory.
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation
    Lincoln issued this proclamation, it freed the slaves.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg

    The Battle of Gettysburg
    The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.
  • 13th Amendment

    13th Amendment
    "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.".
  • The Treaty at Appomattox Courthouse

    The Treaty at Appomattox Courthouse
    The Battle of Appomattox Court House, fought in Appomattox County, Virginia, on the morning of April 9, 1865, was one of the last battles of the American Civil War. Where a treaty was made.
  • The Ku Klux Klan is Established

    The Ku Klux Klan is Established
    A group including many former Confederate veterans founded the first branch of the Ku Klux Klan as a social club in Pulaski, Tennessee, this later developed into a radical racist hate group and still exists today.
  • 14th Amendment

    14th Amendment
    " granted citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States—including former slaves—and guaranteed all citizens “equal protection of the laws.”"
  • 15th Amendment

    15th Amendment
    "Right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude."
  • John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil

    John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil
    In 1870, John D. Rockefeller established Standard Oil, which by the early 1880's controlled 90 percent of U.S. refineries and pipelines. Critics accused Rockefeller of partaking in unethical practices, such as predatory pricing and colluding with railroads to eliminate his competitors in order to gain a monopoly in the industrial industry.
  • Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone

    Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone
    March 7, 1876, Bell was granted his telephone patent. A few days later, he made the first-ever telephone call to Watson, uttering the now-famous phrase, “Mr. Watson, come here".
  • Battle of the Little Bighorn

    Battle of the Little Bighorn
    a battle between combined forces of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes and the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army.
  • The Great Oklahoma Land Race

    The Great Oklahoma Land Race
    The Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889 was the first land rush into the Unassigned Lands
  • Battle of Wounded Knee

    Battle of Wounded Knee
    A domestic massacre of nearly three hundred Lakota people
  • Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    Ellis Island opened as an immigration station as of January 1, 1892. Annie Moore(17), from County Cork, Ireland was the first immigrant to arrive at the new federal immigration depot.
  • Plessy vs. Ferguson

    Plessy vs. Ferguson
    A landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court that upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities
  • The Sinking of the USS Maine

    The Sinking of the USS Maine
    Maine was sent to Havana Harbor to protect U.S. interests during the Cuban War of Independence. She exploded and sank on the evening of 15 February 1898, killing three-quarters of her crew.
  • The Wizard of Oz (Book) is Published

    The Wizard of Oz (Book) is Published
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is an American children's novel written by author L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W. W. Denslow, originally published by the George M. Hill Company in May 1900.
  • J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel

    J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel
    the depression subsided in the late 1890s, Morgan had his sights set on steel. He made an alliance with Carnegie Steel's president, Charles Schwab, to negotiate a secret sale of Carnegie Steel. Dale Carnegie wanted $480 million, and Morgan didn't even blink before buying.
  • Teddy Roosevelt Becomes President of the United States

    Teddy Roosevelt Becomes President of the United States
  • Ford Motor Company is Founded

    Ford Motor Company is Founded
    Ford is an American multinational automaker, its main headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903.
  • Ida Tarbell Publishes Her Article About Standard Oil

    Ida Tarbell Publishes Her Article About Standard Oil
    Tarbell meticulously documented the aggressive techniques Standard Oil employed to outmaneuver and, where necessary, roll over whoever got in its way.
  • The 16th Amendment is Passed

    The 16th Amendment is Passed
    the 16th amendment established Congress's right to impose a Federal income tax.
  • Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    An Immigration Station on Angel Island opened on Jan. 21, 1910, just in time for World War I and the closing of America's "open door" to cut off the tide of these immigrants from Europe.
  • The 17th Amendment is Passed

    The 17th Amendment is Passed
    allowed voters to cast direct votes for U.S. Senators. Prior to its passage, Senators were chosen by state legislatures.
  • The Adoption of the Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem

    The Adoption of the Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem
    In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed an executive order designating it “the national anthem of the United States.
  • Sacco and Vanzetti arrested for armed robbery and murder

    Sacco and Vanzetti arrested for armed robbery and murder
    Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were two Italian immigrant anarchists who were erroneously convicted of murdering a guard and a paymaster during the April 15, 1920, armed robbery of the Slater and Morrill Shoe Company in Braintree, Massachusetts, United States
  • KDKA goes on the air from Pittsburgh

    KDKA goes on the air from Pittsburgh
    The first commercial radio station was KDKA in Pittsburgh, which went on the air in the evening of Nov. 2, 1920, with a broadcast of the returns of the Harding-Cox presidential election.
  • Teapot Dome Scandal

    Teapot Dome Scandal
    The Teapot Dome scandal was a bribery scandal involving the administration of United States President Warren G. Harding
  • 1st Miss America Pageant

    1st Miss America Pageant
    Held in 1921, an activity designed to attract tourists to extend their Labor Day holiday weekend and enjoy festivities in Atlantic City, New Jersey.
  • 1st Winter Olympics Held

    1st Winter Olympics Held
    In 1921, the International Olympic Committee gave its patronage to a Winter Sports Week to take place in 1924 in Chamonix, France.
  • J.Edgar Hoover Becomes Head of the FBI

    J.Edgar Hoover Becomes Head of the FBI
    On May 10, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge appointed Hoover as the fifth Director of the Bureau of Investigation, partly in response to allegations that the prior director, William J. Burns, was involved in the Teapot Dome scandal.
  • The Great Gatsby published by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The Great Gatsby published by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    Fitzgeralds 3rd book, his supreme achievement.
  • Mein Kampf is Published

    Mein Kampf is Published
    Mein Kampf is a 1925 manifesto by Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler. The book shows Hitler's ideology and future plans for Germany. The second volume of Mein Kampf was published a year later.
  • Scopes Monkey Trial

    Scopes Monkey Trial
    The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July 1925 in which a high school teacher, John T. Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which had made it unlawful to teach human evolution in any state-funded school.
  • Charles Lindbergh Completes Solo Flight Across the Atlantic

    Charles Lindbergh Completes Solo Flight Across the Atlantic
    On May 21, 1927, Charles A. Lindbergh completed the first solo, nonstop transatlantic flight in history, flying his Spirit of St.
  • The Jazz Singer Debuts (1st movie with sound)

    The Jazz Singer Debuts (1st movie with sound)
    The Jazz Singer, the first commercially successful full-length feature film with sound, debuts at the Blue Mouse Theater at 1421 5th Avenue in Seattle.
  • St. Valentine's Day Massacre

    St. Valentine's Day Massacre
    The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre was the 1929 murder of seven members and associates of Chicago's North Side Gang that occurred on Saint Valentine's Day. The men were gathered at a Lincoln Park garage on the morning of that feast day.
  • Stock Market Crash Begins Great Depression

    Stock Market Crash Begins Great Depression
    The crash began on Oct. 24, 1929, known as "Black Thursday," when the market opened 11% lower than the previous day's close. The ultimate bottom was reached on July 8, 1932, where the Dow stood at 41.22.
  • Black Tuesday (Stock Market Crash)

    Black Tuesday (Stock Market Crash)
    On October 29, 1929, Black Tuesday hit Wall Street as investors traded some 16 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors.
  • The Dust Bowl Begins

    The Dust Bowl Begins
    The Dust Bowl, also known as “The Dirty Thirties,” started in 1930 and lasted for about a decade, but its long-term economic impacts on the region lingered much longer. Severe drought hit the Midwest and Southern Great Plains in 1930. Massive dust storms began in 1931.
  • The Empire State Building Opens

    The Empire State Building Opens
    On May 1, President Hoover presses a button in Washington, D.C., officially opening the building and turning on the Empire State Building's lights for the first time.
  • Franklin Roosevelt is Elected President (1st Time)

    Franklin Roosevelt is Elected President (1st Time)
    In the 1932 presidential election, Roosevelt defeated Republican President Herbert Hoover in a landslide.
  • Adolf Hitler Become Chancellor of Germany

    Adolf Hitler Become Chancellor of Germany
    Adolf Hitler was appointed chancellor of Germany in 1933 following a series of electoral victories by the Nazi Party.
  • CCC is Created

    CCC is Created
    Roosevelt established the Civilian Conservation Corps with an executive order on April 5, 1933. The CCC was part of his New Deal legislation, combating high unemployment during the Great Depression by putting hundreds of thousands of men to work on environmental conservation projects.
  • WPA is Created

    Roosevelt on April 8, 1935. On May 6, 1935, FDR issued executive order 7034, establishing the Works Progress Administration. The WPA superseded the work of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, which was dissolved.
  • J.J. Braddock Wins Heavyweight Boxing Title

    J.J. Braddock Wins Heavyweight Boxing Title
    On June 13, 1935, at Madison Square Garden Bowl, Braddock won the Heavyweight Championship of the World as the 10-to-1 underdog in what was called "the greatest fistic upset since the defeat of John L. Sullivan by Jim Corbett".
  • Olympic Games in Berlin

    The Summer Olympic Games open in Berlin, attended by athletes and spectators from countries around the world. The Olympic Games were a propaganda success for the Nazi government.
  • Kristallnacht

    Kristallnacht
    Kristallnacht or the Night of Broken Glass, also called the November Pogrom, was a pogrom against Jews carried out by SA paramilitary forces and civilians throughout Nazi Germany on 9–10 November 1938.
  • Grapes of Wrath is Published

    Grapes of Wrath is Published
    The Grapes of Wrath is an American realist novel written by John Steinbeck and published in 1939. The book won the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for fiction, and it was cited prominently when Steinbeck was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1962.
  • Germany Invades Poland

    Germany Invades Poland
    The invasion of Poland marked the beginning of World War II. The German invasion began on 1 September 1939, one week after the signing of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact between Germany and the Soviet Union, and one day after the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union had approved the pact.
  • Wizard of Oz Premiers in Movie Theaters

    Wizard of Oz Premiers in Movie Theaters
    On August 25, 1939, The Wizard of Oz, which will become one of the best-loved movies in history, opens in theaters around the United States. Based on the 1900 children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L.
  • The Battle of Britain

    The Battle of Britain
    a military campaign of WW2 , in which the Royal Air Force and Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy defended the United Kingdom against attacks by Nazi Germany's air force.
  • The Four Freedoms Speech

    The Four Freedoms Speech
    In an address known as the Four Freedoms speech (technically the 1941 State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people "everywhere in the world" ought to enjoy: Freedom of speech. Freedom of worship. Freedom from want.
  • The Bombing of Pearl Harbor

    The Bombing of Pearl Harbor
    A surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service upon the United States against the naval base at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii on December 7th 1941
  • Battle of the Philippines

    Battle of the Philippines
    The invasion of the Philippines by Imperial Japan and the defense of the islands by United States and Philippine forces during the Second World War.
  • The Battle of Midway

    The Battle of Midway
    a major naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II, six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea
  • The Battle of Stalingrad

    The Battle of Stalingrad
    Germany and its allies fought the Soviet Union for control of the city of Stalingrad in Southern Russia.
  • Operation Torch

    Operation Torch
    an Allied invasion of French North Africa during the Second World War. The French colonies in the area were dominated by the French, formally aligned with Germany but of mixed loyalties
  • Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives Program

    Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives Program
    The Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives Program was established in 1943 to help protect cultural property in war areas during and after World War II.
  • The Battle of Kursk

    The Battle of Kursk
    a Second World War engagement between German and Soviet forces on the Eastern Front near Kursk in the Soviet Union
  • D-Day

    D-Day
    This event was the largest waterfront attack, the landing operations and associated airborne operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II
  • The Battle of the Bulge

    The Battle of the Bulge
    a major German offensive campaign on the Western Front during World War II
  • The Battle of Iwo Jima

    The Battle of Iwo Jima
    A major battle in which the U.S Marine Corps and Navy landed on and eventually captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Imperial Japanese Army.
  • The Battle of Okinawa

    The Battle of Okinawa
    Codenamed Operation Iceberg, it was a major battle of the Pacific War fought on the island of Okinawa by U.S Army and Marine Corps Corps forces against the Imperial Japanese Army.
  • The Death of FDR

    The Death of FDR
    After four absolutely chaotic terms, FDR died of a Cerebral hemorrhage.
  • The Death of Adolf Hitler

    The Death of Adolf Hitler
    Adolf Hitler hid inside of an "Air-Raid" bunker, proceeded to eat a cyanide pill and then shot himself in the head.
  • Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima

    Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima
    The U.S army dropped a nuclear bomb named the "Little Boy" on the town of Hiroshima, approximately 80,000 people are killed as a direct result of the blast, and another 35,000 are injured. At least another 60,000 would be dead by the end of the year from the effects of the fallout.
  • Atomic Bombing Nagasaki

    Atomic Bombing Nagasaki
    The U.S dropped the second nuclear bomb just 3 days later named the "Fat Man" on Nagasaki, the number killed is estimated at anywhere between 60,000 and 80,000. The victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were all innocent civilians.
  • Newport Jazz Festival

    Newport Jazz Festival
    A music festival held every summer in Newport, Rhode Island, made to bring Jazz to Rhode Island
  • Nixon-Kennedy Debates

    Nixon-Kennedy Debates
    The Nixon-Kennedy Debates were the first debates broadcasted on national television, provided by CBS, they were known to be the most heated, in depth debates of all time.
  • The Assassination of John F. Kennedy

    The Assassination of John F. Kennedy
    On November 22nd, 1963 President John F. Kennedy was assassinated by oswald during a presidential drive.
  • The Beatles Appear for the first time on the Ed Sullivan Show

    The Beatles Appear for the first time on the Ed Sullivan Show
    On February 9th, 1964 The Beatles made their "record-breaking" first live appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, at Studio 50
  • The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

    The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
    On August 7, 1964, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, authorizing President Johnson to take any measures he believed were necessary to retaliate and to promote the maintenance of international peace and security in southeast Asia.
  • Operation Rolling Thunder

    Operation Rolling Thunder
    an aerial bombardment campaign conducted by the United States Military, and Republic of Vietnam Air Force against the Democratic Republic of Vietnam
  • March on the Pentagon

    March on the Pentagon
    A massive demonstration against the Vietnam War in which 100,000 or more individuals showed up to protest at Lincoln Memorial, later on, more than 50,000 individuals marched to the Pentagon and protested.
  • Riots at the Chicago Democratic Convention

    Riots at the Chicago Democratic Convention
    The convention was held during a year of violence, riots sprung in more than 100 cities following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Chicago 8 Trial

    Chicago 8 Trial
    A trial in which 8 individuals were accused of starting the riots, and put through a rough battle of civil unrest
  • Mai Lai Massacre

    Mai Lai Massacre
    The mass murder of unarmed South Vietnamese civilians by U.S. troops in Sơn Tịnh District, South Vietnam.
  • The Beatles Break Up

    The Beatles Break Up
    The band's members were heavily into drugs and heady on being the biggest band in the world, and led themselves into corruption.
  • Woodstock

    Woodstock
    Woodstock is a music festival that was first held August 15–18, 1969, on a dairy farm in New York, 40 miles southwest of the town of Woodstock. Jimi Hendrix protested the Vietnam War here, and Woodstock was crowned the "3 Days of Peace & Music"
  • The Kent State Protests

    The Kent State Protests
    The Kent State shootings( or The Kent State Protests) were the killings of four and wounding of nine other unarmed Kent State University students by the Ohio National Guard
  • Roe vs. Wade

    Roe vs. Wade
    Decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that the Constitution of the United States protects a pregnant woman's liberty to choose to have an abortion without any government restriction