History Timeline

  • Massacre at Mystic

    Massacre at Mystic
    The Puritans and the English attacked a native tribe called the Pequots. They murdered about 500 men, women, and children.
  • The Scalp Act

    The Scalp Act
    Anyone who brought in a male scalp above age of 12 would be given $150, for females above age of 12 or males under the age of 12, they would be paid $130. The act turned all the tribes against the Pennsylvania legislature.
  • The Boston Tea Party

    The Boston Tea Party
    A political protest that occurred at Griffins Wharf in Boston Massachusetts. It is an important event because it showed Great Britain that Americans wouldn't allow the taxation and tyranny that was occurring.
  • Battles of Lexington and Concord

    Battles of Lexington and Concord
    An ongoing tension between the 13 American colonies and the British authorities were rising pretty quick when one night hundreds of British soldiers marched from Boston to Concord to seize an arms cache. This event is important because when the militiamen got to Concords north bridge, the British were already attacking and winning; at the beginning of that battle, the British fired first which is now known as "The Shot Heard Around The World"
  • The Battles of Lexington and Concord

    The Battles of Lexington and Concord
    The first battles of the American Revolutionary War. British troops marched from Boston to Concord to seize an arms cache. Colonial militia fought off the redcoats before they could officially reach Concord. Confrontations in Lexington was what started these battles, which had the British quickly retreating.
  • The Declaration of Independence is Signed

    The Declaration of Independence is Signed
    While Great Britain ruled the 13 colonies in America, the people residing in those 13 colonies decided that the king wasn't doing a fair job. So the lawmakers of each colony got together and formed a congress. Together in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania they started to write the Declaration of Independence. This event is important because the American colonies were finally dividing themselves from being ruled by Great Britain.
  • Winter at Valley Forge

    Winter at Valley Forge
    During the very harsh times at Valley Forge, George Washingtons strong leadership allowed him to turn a broken down Continental Army into a unified fighting force which led them to defeating the British. Winter at Valley Forge was an important event because without the Continental Army working together and being a strong force, the British would've won, creating a different path in history.
  • The Battle of Cowpens

    The Battle of Cowpens
    This battle was fought during the American Revolutionary War near Cowpens, South Carolina. The American troops were led by Brigadier General Daniel Morgan and the British troops were led by Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton. More than 800 British troops were lost in this battle, while the Americans suffered with less than 100 deaths.
  • Articles of Confederation are Ratified

    Articles of Confederation are Ratified
    This event during the American revolution took four years to be finalized. The reason being that Virginia and Maryland couldn't agree on a decision, delaying it for so long. This event is important because it was a guide for the people to follow as new lawmakers were took over.
  • The Battle of Yorktown (Sep. 28 - Oct. 19)

    The Battle of Yorktown (Sep. 28 - Oct. 19)
    When General Lord Charles Cornwallis and his army surrendered to General George Washington’s army along with French allies at the Battle of Yorktown, it concluded the final major battle of the American Revolution. Forming the nations new independence. This event is important because when that battle ended, it allowed the people of the American Colonies to finally be free and rule their land as they please.
  • The 3/5ths Compromise

    The 3/5ths Compromise
    This meant that 3 out of every 5 slaves would be counted and used for representatives of the state.
  • The Constitution is Ratified

    The Constitution is Ratified
    Five states, which included: Delaware, Pennsylvania, Georgia, New Jersey, and Connecticut, voted for it to be ratified very quickly. However, other states had concerns over the lack of constitutional protection of basic rights. Eventually a compromise was created under Massachusetts therefore encouraging other states to ratify the constitution. This event is important because by creating this paper, it helped create a picture of who they were as free Americans.
  • Presidential Inauguration of George Washington

    Presidential Inauguration of George Washington
    George Washington has the high honor of being the first American president and he was also the first inaugural speech at Federal Hall in New York. This event is important because it created a new leadership for America, paving the way for future leaders.
  • Washingtons Farewell Address

    Washingtons Farewell Address
    In his farewell letter Washington talked about avoiding political party divisions. He also talked about celebrating achievements within. This event is important because it helped create a road for Americans to follow and learn from.
  • The Death of George Washington

    The Death of George Washington
    In Washingtons years within the government he fought for the people of America. He wanted to make sure they were being lead in the right direction. This event is important because during this time he was a sought after politician who knew America better than anyone. He was a hero for helping to make them independent from Great Britain.
  • Election Day 1800 (oct. 31 - dec. 3)

    Election Day 1800 (oct. 31 - dec. 3)
    This election was fought between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. Each candidate thought it would be the end of the nation if either were to win. At the end of the election, a huge victory was brought upon the Democratic-Republicans, including a 65-39 majority in the House of Representatives. This event is important because he would then go on to stabilize the U.S. economy.
  • Marbury vs. Madison

    Marbury vs. Madison
    This case came about when Madison refused to give Marbury his commission. When taken to court, it was decided that the Constitution did not have the power to make the Supreme Court issue a writ. This event is important because it set a boundary of power for the judicial court.
  • Slave Trade Ends in the U.S.

    Slave Trade Ends in the U.S.
    A federal law made it illegal to transport captive people from Africa to the U.S. It marks the end of the transatlantic slave trade into the U.S.
  • Battle of Tippecanoe

    Battle of Tippecanoe
    Fought on Battle Ground, Indiana between American Major General William Henry Harrison over Shawnee Indians led by Tecumseh’s brother Laulewasikau (Tenskwatawa), known as the Prophet. Harrison repelled the Shawnee attack and burned the village.
  • The Battle of Baltimore

    The Battle of Baltimore
    This battle was fought on land and the sea. It was fought between British invaders and American defenders, who of which killed the British commander.
  • The Battle of New Orleans

    The Battle of New Orleans
    This battle was fought between the British Army led by Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army led by Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson. This was the first major battle of the War of 1812. The Americans end up defeating the British forces.
  • The Election of Andrew Jackson

    The Election of Andrew Jackson
    This presidency was between John Quincy Adams of the Republican Party and Andrew Jackson of the Democratic Party. Andrews victory sparked the start of the Democratic Party dominance is politics.
  • Indian Removal Act

    Indian Removal Act
    Allowed the president to negotiate with southern Native American tribes to move west of the Mississippi River in exchange for white settlement of their ancestral lands.
  • Trail of Tears

    Trail of Tears
    This event happened when the government wanted to start growing cotton on Native lands. The government forced them out of their reservations and led the natives over 5,000 miles.
  • Nat Turner Rebellion

    Nat Turner Rebellion
    An enslaved man named Nathaniel Turner led a rebellion in Southampton County, Virginia, which led to a massacre of up to 200 black people. It also created a new wave of oppressive legislation prohibiting the education, movement, and assembly of enslaved people.
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation
    This is the event, which Abraham Lincoln issued, that declared all enslaved people in the Confederacy as free.
  • The Battle of The Alamo

    The Battle of The Alamo
    This battle was fought between Texas and Mexico. Texas was fighting for independence from Mexico. The Texan defenders, numbering at around 200, held out the Mexican army, numbering at the thousands, for 13 days. Mexico ended up overpowering the Texans in the end.
  • The Fugitive Slave Act

    The Fugitive Slave Act
    A pair of federal laws that allowed for the capture and return of runaway enslaved people within the territory of the United States.
  • Dred Scott Decision

    Dred Scott Decision
    This case was a decade long fight for freedom by an enslaved man named Dred Scott. The case went through lots of courts before eventually reaching the Supreme Court. This case gave a push on the Anti-slavery movement and was also a stepping stone to the Civil War.
  • The Dead Rabbits Riot

    The Dead Rabbits Riot
    A fight between the Bowery Boys and the Dead Rabbits started, causing a two day riot. The Bowery Boys fought back with fire arms, clubs, brick-bats, and stones. They were finally forced to retreat, and the Dead Rabbits went back to their houses. The riot resulted in eight deaths and a hundred injuries. The reason for the riot was because of the New York City Police still being upset from the fight between the Municipal and Metropolitan police.
  • Abraham Lincoln Elected President

    Abraham Lincoln Elected President
    Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States. He was the first Republican to win the presidency.
  • South Carolina Secedes from the U.S.

    South Carolina Secedes from the U.S.
    Within three months of Lincoln being elected, seven states had seceded because of the creation of a new nation which was the Confederacy.
  • The First Battle of Bull Run

    The First Battle of Bull Run
    This was the first battle of the American Civil War. It was fought in Prince William County, Virginia; the fight was between the Union and Confederate armies. The fight started when a group of 35,000 troops marched from Washington, D.C. to Bull Run to attack a Confederate group of 20,000. The Confederates were able to strike back and sent the Union running back to Washington.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg

    The Battle of Gettysburg
    This battle was fought from July 1-July 3 and is considered one of the most important battles in the American Civil War. After a victory over the Union at Chancellorsville, General Robert E. Lee marched his army into Pennsylvania in late June 1863. On July 1, the Confederates clashed with the Union’s Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George G. Meade, in Gettysburg. The Union ends up stopping Robert E. Lee's invasion of the north.
  • The Treaty at Appomattox Court House

    The Treaty at Appomattox Court House
    This battle led to the surrender of Robert E. Lee's confederate army. He then left the Confederate capital of Richmond to try and gather the last of the confederate troops and return to North Carolina to resume fighting.
  • The 13th Amendment

    The 13th Amendment
    This amendment abolished slavery completely in the U.S. It also outlawed the practice of involuntary serving and debt serving.
  • The Ju Klux Klan is Established

    The Ju Klux Klan is Established
    In Pulaski, Tennessee a group of conservative veterans got together to create a secret society, also known as the KKK, to protest the rise of the black population having rights. The group often participated in terrorist acts against African Americans and white republicans.
  • The 14th Amendment

    The 14th Amendment
    This amendment granted citizenship to all people, including enslaved people, born and raised in the U.S. It also guaranteed protection by law.
  • John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil

    John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil
    Rockefeller borrowed money to buy out his partners and take control of the refinery, which was the largest in Cleveland. Kerosene, used in lamps, was becoming quite the money maker. In 1870, Rockefeller formed the Standard Oil Company of Ohio, with his younger brother William, Henry Flagler and a group of other men. Rockefeller was its president and largest shareholder.
  • The 15th Amendment

    The 15th Amendment
    This amendment states that a citizen of the U.S. will not be denied the right to vote no matter their race, color, or state of servitude.
  • Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone

    Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone
    After moving to Boston and Marrying one of his students, Bell found an interest in transmitting speech through wires. Bell wanted to improve what was at the time the Telegraph so that people wouldn't have to delivered messages. There could now be a connection between two points at different locations. The first words spoke through a telephone was "Mr.Watson, come here, I need you" from Bell to his assistant.
  • The Battle of Little Bighorn

    The Battle of Little Bighorn
    This war was between federal troops led by Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and Lakota Sioux and Cheyenne warriors. The reason for the tension was the discovery of gold on the Native Americans land. When a number of tribes missed a federal deadline to move to reservations, the U.S. Army was dispatched to confront them. Custer was blind sighted of the number of Indians at Sitting Bull at Little Bighorn, and his forces were outnumbered and defeated in what was Custer’s Last Stand.
  • The Great Oklahoma Land Race

    The Great Oklahoma Land Race
    Thousands of settlers raced into the newly opened Oklahoma territory to claim cheap land.
  • The Battle of Wounded Knee

    The Battle of Wounded Knee
    A massacre that occurred on Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Almost 300 Lakota people were murdered by the U.S. army.
  • Plessy vs Fergusion

    Plessy vs Fergusion
    This case resulted from the incident where Homer Plessy would not sit in a car reserved for Black people, saying it was unconstitutional. The supreme court ruled that creating a legal distinction between the two was not unconstitutional. A result of this was separate public accommodations based on race.
  • The Sinking of The USS Maine

    The Sinking of The USS Maine
    An explosion of an unknown origin sank the ship and killed 266 of 354 crew members.
  • The Wizard of Oz (book) was published

    The Wizard of Oz (book) was published
    A children's book written by L. Frank Baum became very popular due to the literary and fantasy animals. However the movie that was made about the book later became a household known name.
  • J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel

    J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel
    J.P. Morgan along with Andrew Carnegie, Elbert H. Gary, and Charles M. Schwab were all involved in the United States Steel Corporation which later would be turned into the U.S. Steel Company due to a consolidation between Carnegie Steel Company and Federal Steel Company.
  • Teddy Roosevelt Becomes President

    Teddy Roosevelt Becomes President
    Roosevelt, a Republican, unexpectedly became president after the assassination of William McKinley. He would also be re-elected for a second term in 1904. Roosevelt won a Nobel peace prize for his negotiations to end the Russo-Japanese War and starting the beginning of construction on the Panama Canal.
  • Ford Motor Company is Founded

    Ford Motor Company is Founded
    Ford built his first gas powered vehicle, which he called the Quadricycle, behind his home in a workshop. He had tried to start two automobile companies before 1903 and failed. A month after Ford Motor Company was established, the first Ford car was assembled at a plant on Mack Avenue in Detroit. The first cars were built by hand by small groups of workers.
  • Ida Tarbell Published her Article About Standard Oil

    Ida Tarbell Published her Article About Standard Oil
    Tarbell wrote that the oil companies were just a big monopoly and were just taking everyones money by creating their own rates based on what they wanted. She was able to get it taken to court and the oil company had to be broken up into regions.
  • The 16th Amendment is Passed

    The 16th Amendment is Passed
    The 16th amendment established Congresses right to impose a federal tax income.
  • Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    The island served as the main immigration facility on the West Coast from 1910 to 1940. Many immigrants from China and other Asian countries were detained there for long periods of time thanks to the Chinese Exclusion Act and other discriminatory immigration laws. A mass of the people started to come over at the start of the gold rush. Some worked as miners, worked on farms, in textile factories, or building the transcontinental railroad.
  • The 17th Amendment is Passed

    The 17th Amendment is Passed
    The 17th Amendment was modified to allow voters to cast direct votes for U.S. Senators instead of Senators being elected by Legislators
  • The Adoption of The Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem

    The Adoption of The Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem
    The Star Spangled Banner, which was written by Francis Scott Key, was adopted as the National Anthem by the passing of the bill by President Herbert Hoover.
  • The Empire State Building Opens

    The Empire State Building Opens
    The creation of the Empire State Building is said to have been the result of a bet between Walter Chrysler, Chrysler Corporation and John Jakob Raskob, General Motors, to see who could build the taller building. They both set out to find investors and got started on building. It took just a little over a year for the building to be complete. Completing, at times, four-and-a-half stories a week
  • Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    Ellis Island served as an immigrant station for 60 years before closing in 1954. Close to 40 percent of all current U.S. citizens can trace at least one of their ancestors to Ellis Island. Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island were tagged with information from their ship’s registry; they then waited on long lines for medical and legal inspections to determine if they were fit to enter into the U.S. Almost 12 million immigrants passed through Ellis Island.