Fisher, Sarah World War 2, per 6

  • Acording to 1910 cenus, Sighet had 21,370 inhabitants

  • Adolf Hilter becomes leader of Nationalist Socialist (Nazi) Party

  • Hitler's book "Mein Kampf" is published

    This book shares Hilter's political ideology and his future plans for Germany.
  • Germany is admitted to League of Nations

  • Wiesel born in Sighet, Romania

  • Stock market on Wall Street crashes

  • Germans elect Nazis making them the 2nd largest political party in Germany

  • Adolf Hilter becomes Chancellor of Germany

  • First concentration camp opened at Oranienberg outside Berlin

  • Enabling Act gives Hilter dictatorial power

  • Nazis boycott Jewish owned shops

  • Nazis burn books in Germany

  • Nazis open Dachau concentration camp

  • Nazi party declared Germany's only political party

  • Germany quits the League of Nations

  • Adolf Hilter becomes Fuhrer of Germany

  • Hilter violates the Treaty of Versailles by introducing military conscription

  • German Jews stripped of rights by Nuremberg Race Laws

  • Olympic games begin in Berlin

  • Hitler reveals war plans during Hossbach Conference

  • Germany announces 'Anschluss' union with Austria

  • German military mobilizes

  • Hitler threatens Jews during Reichstag speech

  • Nazis take Czechoslovakia

  • World War II Begins

  • Nazis invade Poland

  • Britain, France, Australia and New Zealand declare war on Germany

  • United States proclaims its neutrality; German troops cross the Vistula River in Poland

  • Canada declares war on Germany; Battle of the Atlantic begins

  • Assassination attempt on Hitler fails.

  • Nazis invade Denmark and Norway

  • Nazis invade France, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands; Winston Churchill becomes British Prime Minister

  • United States military conscription bill passed.

  • Massive German air raid on London

  • Nazis invade Greece and Yugoslavia

  • United States freezes German and Italian assets in America

  • Nazis began shooting Jews in open fields on the outshirts of towns

  • Jews shot in open fields cont.

    This is likely when Moshie the Beadle was transported out of town with all the other imigrant Jews, and he came back with his story of people being shot at a location far away.
  • Extermination centers

    Six extermination centers were established in occupied Poland where large-scale murder by gas and body disposal through cremation were conducted systematically. Victims were deported to these centers from Western Europe and from the ghettos in Eastern Europe which the Nazis had established.
  • This was likely when Wiesel was taken out of his ghetto and taken to Aushwitz (an extermination center)

    Although Aushwitz had a gas center that Wiesel never experienced it ( it never says so in his book Night) did have a cremation center where many people that were still alive where burned to death.
  • Roosevelt freezes Japanese assets in United States and suspends relations.

  • Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor; Hitler issues the Night and Fog decree.

  • United States and Britain declare war on Japan.

  • Hitler declares war on the United States.

  • Hitler takes complete control of the German Army

  • First deportation of Jews takes place (Sighet)

  • This is where Wiesel was transported first and was near the cremation center in his block.

  • Jews were being relocated to ghettos, rations were reduced, conditions were horrible and the Jews did not have the strength, physically, or emotionally.

  • Jews were being relocated cont.

    This explains the weakness Weisel and his father felt during the Holocaust when the rations were lessened and they were practically starved to death.
  • By mid 1942, mass gassing of Jews using Zyklon-B began at Auschwitz,

    where extermination was conducted on an industrial scale with some estimates running as high as three million persons eventually killed through gassing, starvation, disease, shooting, and burning.
  • First bombing raid by Americans on Germany (at Wilhelmshaven).

  • Jewish resistance in the Warsaw Ghetto ends.

  • Second deportation of Jews takes place (Sighet)

  • 13,000 Jews in Sighet ghetto

  • Weisel was taken out of the ghetto and moved to concentration camps

  • Soviet forces were the first to approach a major Nazi camp, reaching Majdanek near Lublin, Poland, in July 1944. Surprised by the rapid Soviet advance, the Germans attempted to hide the evidence of mass murder by demolishing the camp.

  • This was when Eliezer and his father were put on a death march to another camp on the inside of Poland to make the Red Army think there was never a genocide happening.

  • Anne Frank and family arrested by the Gestapo in Amsterdam, Holland.

  • The Soviets liberated Auschwitz, the largest killing center and concentration camp, in January 1945.

  • This is when Elizer left the infirmary in fear of the unknown and when on the death march with his father.

  • US forces liberated the Buchenwald concentration camp near Weimar, Germany, on April 11, 1945, a few days after the Nazis began evacuating the camp.

  • This was when Elizer was liberated and hospitalized at the end of the book.

  • After liberation, Wiesel became sick with intestinal problems and spent several days in a hospital.

  • Hilter commits suicide

  • When Wiesel was released from the hospital, he had no family to return to. He joined a group of 400 orphan children being taken to France

  • From 1945 to 1947, he was in different homes in France found for him by a Jewish group called the Children’s Rescue Society. He remained an Orthodox Jew in practice, but began to have questions about God.

  • Upon arrival, he tried to immigrate to Palestine but was not allowed.

  • American, British, and French troops move into Berlin

  • World War II ends

  • There were 2,300 Jews in Sighet

  • In 1947, he began to study French with a tutor. By chance, Wiesel’s sister, Hilda, saw his picture in a newspaper and got in touch with him. Months later, Wiesel was also reunited with his sister Bea in Antwerp.

  • One night in July 1956, Wiesel was crossing a New York street when a taxi hit him. He underwent a 10-hour operation. Once he recovered, he began to concentrate more on his writing.

  • In 1969, Wiesel married Marion Erster Rose, a divorced woman from Austria. She translated all of Wiesel’s subsequent books. In 1972, they had a son who they named Shlomo Elisha Wiesel, after Wiesel’s father.

  • Wiesel won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986, and later founded the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity with his wife Marion (Erster Rose) Wiesel.