Economic Embargo Agaisnt Cuba

Timeline created by dejoure33
  • Eisenhower approves a covert action plan against Cuba

    Eisenhower approves a covert action plan against Cuba
    March 17. President Eisenhower approves a covert action plan against Cuba that includes the use of a "powerful propaganda campaign" designed to overthrow Castro. The plan includes: a) the termination of sugar purchases b) the end of oil deliveries c) continuation of the arms embargo in effect since mid-1958 d) the organization of a paramilitary force of Cuban exiles to invade the island. October 19. U.S. imposes a partial economic embargo on Cuba that excludes food and medicine.
  • President Kennedy broadens the partial trade

    February 7. President Kennedy broadens the partial trade restrictions imposed by Eisenhower to a ban on all trade with Cuba, except for non-subsidized sale of foods and medicines. March 23. President Kennedy expands the Cuban embargo to include imports of all goods made from or containing Cuban materials, even if made in other countries. August 1. The Foreign Assistance Act is amended to prohibit aid to "any country" that provides assistance to Cuba. October 2. The U.S. government cables al
  • The Kennedy administration prohibits travel to Cuba

    February 8. The Kennedy administration prohibits travel to Cuba and makes financial and commercial transactions with Cuba illegal for U.S. citizens.
  • The U.S. Department of Commerce

    May 14. The U.S. Department of Commerce announces the requirement of specific approval for exports of all food and medicine to Cuba.
  • John F. Kennedy's assassination

    December 12. Less than one month after President John F. Kennedy's assassination, U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy seeks to end the travel ban to Cuba in a memo to Secretary of State Dean Rusk. He refers to the ban as "inconsistent with traditional American liberties," and difficult to enforce. The memo is not released to the public until June 29 2005.
  • U.S. President Carter drops the ban on travel to Cuba

    U.S. President Carter drops the ban on travel to Cuba
    March 19. U.S. President Carter drops the ban on travel to Cuba and on U.S. citizens spending dollars in Cuba. Wayne Smith, Director of Cuban Affairs at the Department of State under Jimmy Carter: "There were three major fields or issues that had to be addressed before there could be a substantial improvement in relations. Number one: Cuban troops had to begin to leave Africa. Number two: There had to be some improvement in Cuba's human rights performance, and specially in terms of releasing po
  • The U.S. State Department warns

    May 25. The U.S. State Department warns that Cuba's recent deployment of military advisors in Ethiopia could "impede the improvement of U.S.-Cuban relations."
  • The Carter Administration relaxes laws

    The Carter Administration relaxes laws
    February 27. U.S. Secretary of State, Cyrus Vance, states that he does not foresee the normalization of relations with Cuba due to the presence of Cuban troops in Africa. The Carter Administration relaxes laws to allow U.S. residents to send money to relatives in Cuba.
  • Ronald Reagan is inaugurated as U.S. President

    Ronald Reagan is inaugurated as U.S. President
    January. Ronald Reagan is inaugurated as U.S. President, and institutes the most hostile policy against Cuba since the invasion at Bay of Pigs. Despite conciliatory signals from Cuba, the new U.S. administration announces a tightening of the embargo.
  • The Reagan Administration

    The Reagan Administration
    April 19. The Reagan Administration reestablishes the travel ban, prohibits U.S. citizens from spending money in Cuba, and allows the 1977 fishing accord to lapse.
  • Cuban Democracy Act

    October 15. U.S. Congress passes the Cuban Democracy Act, which prohibits foreign-based subsidiaries of U.S. companies from trading with Cuba, travel to Cuba by U.S. citizens, and family remittances to Cuba. The law allows private groups to deliver food and medicine to Cuba. (At this time, 70% of Cuba's trade with U.S. subsidiary companies was in food and medicine. Many claim the Cuban Democracy Act is in violation of international law and United Nations resolutions that food and medicine cannot
  • President Bush signs the Cuban Democracy Act

    President Bush signs the Cuban Democracy Act
    October 23. President Bush signs the Cuban Democracy Act into law. Congressman Torricelli says that it will bring down Castro "within weeks."
  • Clinton Administration

    October 5. The Clinton Administration announces a new people-to-people-contact plan.
  • he United Nations General Assembly recommends an end to the embargo

    November 2. The United Nations General Assembly recommends an end to the embargo (for the fourth consecutive year) by a vote of 117 to 3 (38 abstentions). Only Israel and Uzbekistan join the U.S. in saying no. Since then, each time the vote comes up at the UN, the number of nations voting against the embargo increases.
  • US Senator Michael B. Enzi introduces the "Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act"

    March 1. US Senator Michael B. Enzi introduces the "Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act" on the floor of the senate: "If you keep on doing what you have always been doing," he says, "you are going to wind up getting what you already got. …We are not hurting the Cuban government; we are hurting the Cuban people. …It is time for a different policy."