Evolution of Media

Timeline created by acerence21
  • 35,000 BCE

    Cave Paintings

    Cave Paintings
    Cave painting. Cave or rock paintings are paintings painted on cave or rock walls and ceilings, usually dating to prehistoric times. Rock paintings have been made since the Upper Paleolithic, 40,000 years ago. They have been found in Europe, Africa, Australia, and Southeast Asia.
  • 2,500 BCE

    Papyrus

    Papyrus
    Papyrus is a material similar to thick paper that was used in ancient times as a writing surface. It was made from the pith of the papyrus plant, Cyperus papyrus, a wetland sedge.[1] Papyrus (plural: papyri) can also refer to a document written on sheets of such material, joined together side by side and rolled up into a scroll, an early form of a book.
  • 2,400 BCE

    Clay Tablets

    Clay Tablets
    Clay tablets were a medium used for writing. They were common in the Fertile Crescent, from about the 5th millennium BC. A clay tablet is a more or less flat surface made of clay. Using a stylus, symbols were pressed into the soft clay. It is possible to correct errors on the tablet.
  • -130 BCE

    Acta Diurna

    Acta Diurna
    Acta Diurna were daily Roman official notices, a sort of daily gazette. They were carved on stone or metal and presented in message boards in public places like the Forum of Rome. They were also called simply Acta. In many ways, they functioned as an early newspaper for the Roman citizenry.
  • Newspaper

    Newspaper
    A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background. Newspapers can cover a wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sports and art, and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns.
  • Telegraph

    Telegraph
    A telegraph is a communications system in which information is transmitted over a wire through a series of electrical current pulses, usually in the form of Morse code. The basic components include a source of direct current, a length of wire or cable, and a current-indicating device such as a relay, buzzer, or light bulb. The term comes from the Greek words "tele," meaning "at a distance" and "graphien," meaning "to write."
  • Printing Press (19th Century)

    Printing Press (19th Century)
    A printing press is a mechanical device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper ), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement in earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.
  • Typewriter

    Typewriter
    Typewriters were much more comfortable than writing in hand. This helped the industrial revolution by allowing people to write manuals for the workers and mass produce them much easier. ... Nowadays, the evolved form of typewriters are computers which have many more functions that a typewriter.
  • Telephone

    Telephone
    A telephone is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly. A telephone converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals that are transmitted via cables and other communication channels to another telephone which reproduces the sound to the receiving user.
  • Motion Picture Photography/Projection

    Motion Picture Photography/Projection
    Motion picture, also called film or movie, series of still photographs on film, projected in rapid succession onto a screen by means of light. Because of the optical phenomenon known as persistence of vision, this gives the illusion of actual, smooth, and continuous movement.
  • Radio

    Radio
    Radio is the technology of signaling and communicating using radio waves. Radio waves are electromagnetic waves of frequency between 30 hertz (Hz) and 300 gigahertz (GHz). They are generated by an electronic device called a transmitter connected to an antenna that radiates the waves and received by a radio receiver connected to another antenna.
  • Motion Picture with Sound

    Motion Picture with Sound
    A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film. The first known public exhibition of projected sound films took place in Paris in 1900, but decades passed before sound motion pictures were made commercially practical.
  • Televison

    Televison
    is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome, or in color, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program, or the medium of television transmission. Television is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment, and news. Television became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers.
  • Transistor Radio

    Transistor Radio
    The transistor radio is a small portable radio receiver that uses transistor-based circuitry. Following the invention of the transistor, the first commercial transistor radio was released in 1954. The mass-market success of the smaller and cheaper Sony TR-63, released in 1957, led to the transistor radio becoming the most popular electronic communication device of the 1960s and 1970s. Transistor radios are still commonly used as car radios.
  • Mainframe Computer

    Mainframe Computer
    are computers used primarily by large organizations for critical applications; bulk data processing, such as, industry, and consumer statistics, enterprise resource planning; and transaction processing. They are larger and have more processing power than some other classes of computers: minicomputers, servers, workstations, and personal computers.
    The term originally referred to the large cabinets called "mainframes" that housed the central processing unit and main memory of early computers.
  • Email

    Email
    Email is much older than ARPANet or the Internet. It was never invented; it evolved from very simple beginnings. An early email was just a small advance on what we know these days as a file directory - it just put a message in another user's directory in a spot where they could see it when they logged in. Simple as that. Just like leaving a note on someone's desk.
  • Computer

    Computer
    A computer is a machine that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically via computer programming. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. A "complete" computer including the hardware, the operating system, and peripheral equipment required and used for "full" operation can be referred to as a computer system.
  • Internet

    Internet
    Internet is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies.
  • Social Network

    Social Network
    is a social structure made up of a set of social actors, sets of dyadic ties, and other social interactions between actors. The social network perspective provides a set of methods for analyzing the structure of whole social entities as well as a variety of theories explaining the patterns observed in these structures. The study of these structures uses social network analysis to identify local and global patterns, locate influential entities, and examine network dynamics.
  • Friendster

    Friendster
    Friendster was a social gaming site based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was originally a social networking service website. Before Friendster was redesigned, the service allowed users to contact other members, maintain those contacts, and share online content and media with those contacts. The website was also used for dating and discovering new events, bands, and hobbies. Users could share videos, photos, messages, and comments with other members via profiles and networks.
  • Multiply

    Multiply
    Multiply was a social networking service with an emphasis on allowing users to share media – such as photos, videos and blog entries – with their "real-world" network. The website was launched in March 2004 and was privately held with backing by VantagePoint Venture Partners, Point Judith Capital, Transcosmos, and private investors. Multiply had over 11 million registered users.
  • Facebook

    Facebook
    Facebook is a social networking website that was originally designed for college students but is now open to anyone 13 years of age or older. Facebook users can create and customize their own profiles with photos, videos, and information about themselves. Friends can browse the profiles of other friends and write messages on their pages.
  • Twitter

    Twitter
    Twitter is a free social networking microblogging service that allows registered members to broadcast short posts called tweets. Twitter members can broadcast tweets and follow other users' tweets by using multiple platforms and devices. Tweets and replies to tweets can be sent by cell phone text message, desktop client or by posting at the Twitter.com website.
  • Twitter

    Twitter
    Twitter is a free social networking microblogging service that allows registered members to broadcast short posts called tweets. Twitter members can broadcast tweets and follow other users' tweets by using multiple platforms and devices. Tweets and replies to tweets can be sent by cell phone text message, desktop client or by posting at the Twitter.com website.
  • Period:
    35,000 BCE
    to

    Pre Industrial Age

    Prehistory is the period of human activity between the use of the first stone tools ~3.3 million years ago and the invention of writing systems, the earliest of which appeared ~5300 years ago. Technology that predates recorded history. History is the study of the past using written records; it is also the record itself. Anything prior to the first written accounts of history is prehistoric (meaning "before history"), including earlier technologies.
  • Period: to

    Industrial Age

    The Industrial Age is a period of history that encompasses the changes in economic and social organization that began around 1760 in Great Britain and later in other countries, characterized chiefly by the replacement of hand tools with power-driven machines such as the power loom and the steam engine, and by the concentration of industry in large establishments.
  • Period: to

    Electronic Age

    The Electronic age is the invention of the transistor ushered in the electronic age. People harnessed the power of transistor that led to the transistor communication became more efficient.
  • Period: to

    Information Age

    Digital Age or Informational Age is a period in human history characterized by the shift from traditional industry that the Industrial Revolution brought through industrialization, to an economy based on information computerization. The internet paved the way for advanced the used of microelectronics with the invention of personal computers, devices wearable technology. Moreover, voice, image, sounds, and data are digitalized.