Australia's Involvement in the Vietnam War (http://www.vvaa.org.au/calendar.htm http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/vietnam.asp)

By suwavi
  • Australia sends Advisers to South Vietnam

    Australia sends Advisers to South Vietnam
    Australia sends 30 advisers to South Vietnam to help out the American and South Vietnamese soldiers.
  • First Australian dies in Vietnam

    First Australian dies in Vietnam
    Advisor, Sergeant William Hacking becomes the first Australian to die in Vietnam when his weapon accidentally discharges after being caught in vegetation.
  • HMAS Sydney travels to South Vietnam

    HMAS Sydney travels to South Vietnam
    The HMAS Sydney travels to Vung Tau in South Vietnam, carrying a bulk of the Australian force.
  • Victoria Cross Award - Kevin Wheatley

    Victoria Cross Award - Kevin Wheatley
    WO2 Kevin "Dasher" Wheatley refuses to leave his mate, WO2 Bob Swanston, and is killed. His actions earned him Australia’s highest honour, the Victoria Cross.
  • Increased Task Force

    Increased Task Force
    Holt announces the Australian commitment in South Vietnam will be Increased to a 4350-man task force, and will include conscripts.
  • Battle of Long Tan

    Battle of Long Tan
    The Australians entered the Long Tan plantation at 3.15 that afternoon. Less than an hour later the Viet Cong attacked in force. It was due to the quick response of a New Zealand artillery battery to desperate calls for support saved D Company from annihilation. From the documents and information acquired, it is estimated that that D Company had faced some 2,500 Viet Cong and eighteen Australians were killed.
  • Victorian Cross Award - Major Peter Badcoe

    Victorian Cross Award - Major Peter Badcoe
    Major Peter Badcoe, AATTV, is killed in action leading two companies of Vietnamese regional forces. For his outstanding heroism in this and two previous actions, he will be posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.
  • Increase of Task Force (2)

    Increase of Task Force (2)
    Harold Holt announces an increase of 1700 to Australia’s commitment in South Vietnam, including a third infantry battalion and a tank squadron.
  • Tet Offensive

    Tet Offensive
    Communist forces in South Vietnam launch what becomes known as the Tet Offensive, with concentrated attacks against every major city and regional centre. Although Tet costs the Communists 45-50,000 troops, it sows serious doubt in the minds of the Australian and American people and leads to major changes in government policy towards the conflict in South Vietnam.
  • Victoria Cross Award - Ray Simpson

    Victoria Cross Award - Ray Simpson
    On 6 May 1969, in the Kon Tum Province, Vietnam, Warrant Officer Class II Simpson rescued a wounded fellow warrant Officer and carried out an unsuccessful attack on a strong enemy position. On 11 May he fought alone against heavy odds to cover the evacuation of a number of casualties.
  • Forces Withdrawn from South Vietnam

    Forces Withdrawn from South Vietnam
    John Grey Gorton (Prime Minister) announces the bulk of Australian forces in South Vietnam are to be withdrawn, leaving only a modified training team. The period of national service is reduced from two years to 18 months.
  • Last of the Australian Troops Return Home

    Last of the Australian Troops Return Home
    After a gruelling 10 years of battle in South Vietnam, the last of the Australian soldiers return home. From the time of the arrival of the first members of the Team in 1962 almost 60,000 Australians, including ground troops and air force and navy personnel, served in Vietnam; 521 died as a result of the war and over 3,000 were wounded.
  • Australian logistic units leave Vung Tau

    Australian logistic units leave Vung Tau
    The last Australian logistic units leave Vung Tau and Australia’s commitment in South Vietnam returns to a training role with the 150-man Australian Assistance Group, Vietnam (AAAGV) and the AATTV.
  • Australia’s military commitment in South Vietnam ends

    Australia’s military commitment in South Vietnam ends
    Australia’s military commitment in South Vietnam ends
  • Ceasefire begins

    Ceasefire begins
    Ceasefire begins
  • Violations of Ceasefire

    Violations of Ceasefire
    International Conference on Vietnam receives first official complaints of violations to the ceasefire.
  • Last Australian Troops to Leave

    Last Australian Troops to Leave
    The Saigon Embassy Guard Platoon are the last Australian troops to leave Vietnam.
  • War has Begun Again

    War has Begun Again
    South Vietnam's President Nguyen Van Thieu declares that war has begun again.
  • Australian Government Responds to Urgent Requests for Transport Assistance

    Australian Government Responds to Urgent Requests for Transport Assistance
    Australian Government responds to urgent requests for transport assistance from Governments of South Vietnam and United States by hastily dispatching a contingent of seven RAAF Hercules and two Dakota aircraft to Vietnam on a humanitarian relief mission The RAAF is utilized in various roles during final weeks of the war, including movement of refugees, transport of Red Cross and UN supplies, and on 4th and 17th April, evacuation of Vietnamese war orphans from Saigon to Bangkok during 'Operation
  • Australia Closes its Embassy

    Australia Closes its Embassy
    Australia closes its embassy in Saigon, completing withdrawal from Vietnam on ANZAC Day. The final task of Australia's military in the Vietnam War is conducted on ANZAC Day, when the RAAF participates in evacuation of the Australian Embassy and final withdrawal of personnel from Saigon
  • Communist Forces Capture Saigon

    Communist Forces Capture Saigon
    Communist forces capture Saigon as the last Americans leave in scenes of panic and confusion.