American Culture and WMU Yearbook Advertisments

Timeline created by Stephanie Wixson
  • Basic Design and Straightforward Content

    Basic Design and Straightforward Content
    WMU began producing yearbooks in 1906 as Western State Normal School, yet advertisements weren't procured as a means for funding from local businesses until 1911. As the first of their kind, they were simple and straightforward. Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2zPDYti
  • Cartoons Reflect 20s Values

    Cartoons Reflect 20s Values
    1927 marked the first year that humorous cartoons were featured alongside the ads, emblematic of how the "happy-go-lucky" culture of the '20s influenced the way Americans doodled, dressed, and laughed. Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2iuvOwW
  • Innovative Advances in Printing Technology

    Innovative Advances in Printing Technology
    The blooming economy of the twenties gave rise to innovation.
    The intricate combination of printmaking and photography exemplified the first attempts at what we've come to know as "photoshop." Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2AajHjg
  • Depression-Era Simplicity

    Depression-Era Simplicity
    The Great Depression's grave hardship became evident in the advertisement pages of the thirties, causing a return to simplistic format and content. Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2yV1Etc
  • WWII Call to Action

    WWII Call to Action
    WWII's influential patriotism caused many local businesses to dedicate full-page ads to the support of the war efforts rather than their own companies. Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2mEeH0d
  • Booming Post-War Economy

    Booming Post-War Economy
    In the USA's post-war economy, Americans had more money and free time than ever before. Time saving, product-based ads became highly popular, oftentimes showcasing disposable paper goods. Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2hBhF0a
  • Franchise America

    Franchise America
    The innovative franchise business plan infiltrated every part of American culture by the '60s. An ad for McDonald's appears in 1960 to speak to how valued this new cheap, fast, easily-accessible food source was - emphasizing the price and drive-through feature.
    Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2zff3R2
  • Student Specific Marketing

    Student Specific Marketing
    Although WMU produced yearbooks until 1975, 1966 marked the last year advertisements were featured. By this time, photos and logos were a mainstay in the shift to speak directly to the audience: College Students. These pictures, accompanied by minimal text, target the ways each company or product could directly impact the consumer.
    Photo courtesy of WMU digital archives:
    http://bit.ly/2yVUe90