Brewster body armor 1917 18

World War 1 Timeline Mills Per. 5

  • Industrialization Competition- Gut 2

    Industrialization Competition- Gut 2
    Britain at the time was on top of the world in the industrialization scene. German decided to also industrialize, they shortly shot up to the top because of their manufacturing of cheaper products
  • Treaty Of Berlin- Gut 2

    Treaty Of Berlin- Gut 2
    After the Russian victory against the Ottoman Empire, the Balkans was restructured by the major powers.
  • Period: to

    Pablo Picasso- Gut 20

    Picassos' work can be categorized in "periods". Some of the periods are called "The Blue Period', "The Rose Period" and the famous "Cubism" period.
  • German and British Rivalries- Gut 2

    German and British Rivalries- Gut 2
    Germany and Britain during the 1890s and onward had economic conflicts. Since Germany had a huge uprising the industrialization scene, they were competing with British manufactures. This then threatened the trade lines
  • The Lost Generation- Gut 20

    The Lost Generation- Gut 20
    Between the times if 1880 and 1900 Europe allowed people who were born at the time to have their own distinct generation.
  • Period: to

    Ernest Hemingway- Gut 20

    Ernest Hemingway was considered a leader of The Lost Generation. During The Great War, he offered to fight with Italy but they were then defeated by the Central Powers.
  • The Great Naval Race- Gut 2

    The Great Naval Race- Gut 2
    The rivalry between Germany and Britain occurred from 1906 to 1914. This rivalry (The Great Naval Race) caused huge friction between the nations. This rivalry was seen as a cause of World War
  • Period: to

    Picasso During The Lost Generation- Gut 20

    Picasso's early work was a style called Cubism. Later on in the war, he changed his style. He did not support Germany and the Germans had adopted his style which prompted the change.
  • Colonial Rivalries- Gut 2

    Colonial Rivalries- Gut 2
    Central powers rivaled over land in the Balkan regions, this rivalry was a cause of the World War
  • Nationalism Propaganda- Gut 4

    Nationalism Propaganda- Gut 4
    Throughout the war, both sides used nationalistic propaganda to bring in more people into the war, "Together We Win".
  • Propaganda In Germany- Gut 4

    Propaganda In Germany- Gut 4
    Germany also used propaganda during the war. One of the posters that were used said "This is how it would look in German lands if the French reached the Rhine.
  • Nationalism in The Great War- Gut 4

    Nationalism in The Great War- Gut 4
    Nationalism is an intense form of patriotism or loyalty to one’s country. Nationalism was frequently used in 20th century Europe and a widespread use during World War I.
  • How Nationalism Started The War- Gut 4

    How Nationalism Started The War- Gut 4
    Nationalism was a cause of the Great War, it led to the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
  • Russia Entering The Warn- Gut 1

    Russia Entering The Warn- Gut 1
    Germany was planning to invade Russia, Russia in return set defense for the planned attack(The Schlieffen Plan August 1914).
  • Baguette Warfare- Gut 1

    Baguette Warfare- Gut 1
    The French and the Russians were in a military alliance when Germany declared war on Russia on August 1st, 1914 Russia refused to demobilize its army. Germany then figured it would be easier to defeat France.
  • Theatres Of The War- Gut 6

    Theatres Of The War- Gut 6
    During the Great War, Russia mobilizes faster than Germany expected. This then causes Germany to fight on two fronts.
  • Germany Entering The War- Gut 1

    Germany Entering The War- Gut 1
    Germany Joined The War because other allied countries entered the war first. The first country to declare war in WWI was Austria-Hungary. Austria-Hungary issued an ultimatum to Serbia after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.
  • Britain Entering The War- Gut 1

    Britain Entering The War- Gut 1
    Britain had an alliance with Belgium, at this time Belgium was neutral in the war. Germany planned to march through Belgium on the way to invade France. This resulted in Britain declaring war on Germany.
  • How Many Troops Were Mobilized- Gut 11

    In total, the Great War mobilized 65,038,810 troops. This is from all the nations
  • Theatres Of The War- Gut 6

    Theatres Of The War- Gut 6
    During the Great War, Belgium was invaded by Germany but was slowed down. This allowed France and Britain to mobilize (Schlieffen Plan)
  • The Eastern Front- Gut 8

    The Eastern Front- Gut 8
    On the Eastern Front was the border of Russia, Germany and Austria-Hungary split their armies and were weakened. They then tried to overtake Russia but were held up at The Battle of The Marne
  • Russian Equipment- Gut 9

    Russian Equipment- Gut 9
    At the beginning of the war, the Russians were creating and manufacturing weapons for the war. But when it came to war they were very ill-equipped.
  • 1st Battle of The Marne- Gut 7

    1st Battle of The Marne- Gut 7
    The battle of the Marne was the first turning point of the war. This battle was the begging of trench warfare. In this battle, French drove the Germans back to the Aisne River.
  • The Triple Entente Over The Western front- Gut 8

    The Triple Entente Over The Western front- Gut 8
    The Triple Entente and Central Powers were all in a fight over the Western Front. The chose the Western Front because the Italian Front was not accessible due to the Italian mountain range
  • Theatres Of The War- Gut 6

    Theatres Of The War- Gut 6
    During The Great War, most of the war in France was fought on the French-German border.
  • Problems With Russia- Gut 3

    Problems With Russia- Gut 3
    Marxists tried to ignite a revolution against the proletariat, this then leads to food and fuel shortages. Workers then went on strike and the people marched through the streets for bread.
  • Swiss Alps- Gut 8

    Swiss Alps- Gut 8
    Trying to go through Italy was not in mind for the enemies. They had the Swiss Alps that were not easy to get up and were covered in snow, and you had rivers like the Isonzo River.
  • Theatres Of The War- Gut 6

    Theatres Of The War- Gut 6
    Germany used the Zepplin to attack England. This was the first air raid attack of the war.
  • Battle of Gallipoli- Gut 7

    Battle of Gallipoli- Gut 7
    This battle could have ended the participation of the Turks in the war if they won. The allies lost around 214,000 soldiers whereas the Turks lost over 300,00
  • Theatres Of The War- Gut 6

    Theatres Of The War- Gut 6
    During The Great War, Turkey lost 300,00 troops, if The Battle Of Gallipoli was successful, it would have ended the Turks Position in the War
  • Armenians Thrown Overboard- Gut 12

    Armenians Thrown Overboard- Gut 12
    Armenian women were often captured by Turkish officers and were forced to join their harems. Both women and children were sold to Moslem purchasers in markets
  • The Armenian Massacre- Gut 12

    The Armenian Massacre- Gut 12
    In the years of 1915 and 1916, the Armenian massacre occurred with the death of one and a half million Armenians in the Ottoman Empire
  • Violated Rights- Gut 12

    Violated Rights- Gut 12
    The Armenian political and intellectual leaders pulled Armenians from their homes in a house by house search. They would then place them in labor camps or labor battalions and kill them off.
  • Armenian Denial- Gut 12

    Armenian Denial- Gut 12
    To this day the Turkish government denies that the genocide never happened. They say that they only "removed" them from the "war zone".
  • The Armenian Genocide- Gut 12

    The Armenian Genocide- Gut 12
    Armenians were often beaten or left to die if they did not have the strength. Armenian prisoners had to go through a life of beatings and rape.
  • Sinking of The Lusitania- Gut 1

    Sinking of The Lusitania- Gut 1
    In the early stages of the war, the U.S. had no concern about the current war that was going on in Eastern Europe between the Central Powers. On May 1st, 1915 the Lusitania set sail from New York, on this ship, there were 1,959 passengers aboard, 128 of them were American. They were killed by a German U-boat this is called 'unrestricted submarine warfare'. This event caused outrage in the U.S. and the government which led the entry of the U.S. in the Great War.
  • Bandwagon- Gut 5

    Bandwagon- Gut 5
    During the Great War, both sides used propaganda to their advantage. A bandwagon is a technique that encourages people to do something or act in some way because other people are doing so.
  • Emotional Words- Gut 5

    Emotional Words- Gut 5
    During the Great War, both sides used propaganda to their advantage. Emotion appeal is when one uses a figure to cause an emotional feeling to encourage a motive.
  • Transfer Propaganda- Gut 5

    Transfer Propaganda- Gut 5
    During the Great War, both sides used propaganda to their advantage. The Transfer technique is when something is related to a respected product or person. They relate them in a way to encourage you
  • Testimonial Propaganda- Gut 5

    Testimonial Propaganda- Gut 5
    During the Great War, both sides used propaganda to their advantage. Testimonial propaganda is when a famous figure encourages a motive to do or buy something.
  • Fear Propaganda- Gut 5

    Fear Propaganda- Gut 5
    During the Great War, both sides used propaganda to their advantage. Fear Propaganda is used to invoke fear or something scary to motivate you to fight against it
  • Battle of Verdun- Gut 7

    Battle of Verdun- Gut 7
    282,000 German soldiers died in one of history's greatest slaughters. This was seen as a major turning point and a loss for Germany.
  • Battle of The Somme- Gut 7

    Battle of The Somme- Gut 7
    This battle was the most costly battle of the war, this day 52,00 troops were lost on the first day in total there were 420,000 British casualties.
  • Battle of The Somme River- Gut 8

    Battle of The Somme River- Gut 8
    The Battle of the Somme was fought along and on a river. This rover is located in France, and the Germans tried to invade. The river made it quite a bit messier for both sides.
  • Trench Warfare- Gut 8

    Trench Warfare- Gut 8
    Trench Warfare was very common during The Great War. Trenches are when soldiers dig a walking space to move that is lower than the surface was a big aspect of what the great war was seen as. Often soldiers would get trench foot from walking around in the trenches. This s when a trench is wet and your feet get soggy and moldy and fall apart.
  • Propaganda- Gut 4

    Propaganda- Gut 4
    In September of 1916, a secret organization in Britain called Wellington House was organized. They called on journalists and newspaper writers to write articles to counter-act the statements made by enemies. This art was called propaganda
  • The Zimmerman Telegram- Gut 10

    The Zimmerman Telegram- Gut 10
    In January of 1917 during the, a telegram was intercepted and decoded. This telegram was sent to the prime minister of Mexico at the time. The telegram was saying that Mexico should ally with Germany and if the U.S. was to join, Mexico would attack the southern border.
  • Russia Collapses- Gut 9

    Russia Collapses- Gut 9
    At the start of 1917, Russia's economy was collapsing. Food and fuel was very low and this ultimately led to the revolution in February
  • Russian Revolution Effects- Gut 9

    Russian Revolution Effects- Gut 9
    The beginning of the Russian Revolution helped the Germans by freeing troops. Later on, this did not help the Germans who were fighting a two-front war
  • Forced Russian Labor- Gut 9

    Forced Russian Labor- Gut 9
    During the revolution, peasants were forced to work in military factories for the war. This helped boost the surplus of weapons to the troops
  • Disillusionment- Gut 19

    The governments had to turn to a total war train of thought and utilised propaganda to their advantage. They also censored much of the media to control the people and their moods.
  • German Disillusionment- Gut 19

    In this time city dwellers in Germany stood up and Germany then sent recruits as young as 15 years old
  • U.S. Entry- Gut 10

    U.S. Entry- Gut 10
    Before the United States declared war on Germany, both sides were at a stalemate, and the war was not really going anywhere.
  • U.S. Economy- Gut 17

    When the U.S. entered the war almost immediately the production of goods switches to military needs. Almost 3 million joined the fight and 500,000 joined a government position of some sort.
  • Morale and Energy Boost- Gut 10

    Morale and Energy Boost- Gut 10
    The advantage of the United States joining was the fresh boost the allies got and the patriotism in the country. War was glamorous and people wanted to join for glory and pride.
  • Reinforcements- Gut 10

    Reinforcements- Gut 10
    at the end of the war, around 4,000,000 soldiers were mobilized. Out of that 4,000,000, only 116,708 died and 204,000 were wounded.
  • Reason of Not Attending- Gut 15

    One of the main reason the U.S. did not attend the Treaty of Versailles is that they did not want to give up their sovereignty
  • Reds vs. Whites - Gut 3

    Reds vs. Whites - Gut 3
    Russia was at civil war for the representation of Russia. The Red army represented the Bolshevik-Communist party and the white army represented the revolutionaries and was loyal to the Tsar
  • After The Russian Revolution- Gut 9

    After The Russian Revolution- Gut 9
    After the Russian Revolution, Russia then decided to leave the war and signed a peace treaty with Germany. This gave Germany a chance to breathe but not a big enough motivation.
  • Marx vs. Lenin- Gut 3

    Marx vs. Lenin- Gut 3
    Marx was the dictator of the proletariat and thought that society would become classless and a collectivist. Lenin strengthened the government and created the secret police. He then became dictator of the communist party.
  • Every 10th Man- Gut 3

    Every 10th Man- Gut 3
    Trotsky had a powerful Red Army. He used the idea of the Romans practice of 'Every 10th Man'. This practice was that every 10th man in a unit that did not perform well would get shot.
  • Killing of 200,000- Gut 3

    Killing of 200,000- Gut 3
    Lenin's secret police killed 200,000 people and banned political parties, newspapers and then created the Gulag. The Gulag was forced labor camps for political prisoners and criminals of the Soviet Union.
  • American Inspiration- Gut 10

    American Inspiration- Gut 10
    During the war, the French were getting tired and war fatigue, after the announcement of the U.S. joining, the allies then felt replenished
  • Death Disillusionment- Gut 19

    In the War almost 10 million were dead, 20 million were maimed or wounded and 20 million died from influenza.
  • British Control- Gut 18

    British Control- Gut 18
    Britain punished Germany and gained control over the land of Palestine, Jordan, and Iraq.
  • Austrian Borders- Gut 18

    Austrian Borders- Gut 18
    Austria-Hungary was left with a landlocked country with a naval force. Helpful... They were also not allowed any army relations.
  • Germanic Borders- Gut 18

    Germanic Borders- Gut 18
    At the end of the peace treaty, Germany was left with 6 ships no sub or tanks or air force. They also had to pay 30 billion in war reparations
  • Cultural Disillusionment- Gut 19

    Colonial soldiers were told that they were fighting for their independence and believed they were no longer subjects. Imperial power was seen as invincible to Asian and African.
  • 2nd Battle of The Marne- Gut 7

    2nd Battle of The Marne- Gut 7
    This battle was Germany's desperate final push, they failed and retreated back to the Hindenburg line.
  • How Many Troops Were Wounded- Gut 11

    In the Great War, the total number of troops from all nations wounded is 21,213,152
  • How Many Troops Were Killed- Gut 11

    The total number of lives taken during the Great War is 8,556,315. This number can be much high but we know at least 8.5 million.
  • How Many Troops Were MIA/POW- Gut 11

    We can not know the exact number in the category it could be hundreds of thousands more that we don't/didn't know of. But from what we have we can guess the total amount is around 12,750,945 troops.
  • Direct Cost of the War-1913 Dollars- Gut 11

    We do not know the overall cost of the whole great war because we can not calculate it. But we can guess the direct cost of the Great War to be somewhere around 82.4 Billion Dollars
  • The Rhineland- Gut 16

    After the treaty, German troops were banned from the Rhineland. This land was taken by France from Germany at the Paris Peace Conference
  • War Taxes- Gut 17

    The War caused a huge upraise in revenue-power of the income tax. During the war, the tax rate was at 77% later in WWll the tax rate was even higher at 94%
  • Free Flow Of People- Gut 17

    During the 19th centuray, the migration rates were sky high. This was happening due to the almost non-existent restrictions. At the time passports were also very new and not really in use
  • Government Regulation- Gut 17

    When the war first started, Britain had the smallest government. Four years later the British government had extensive government power
  • Costs of War- Gut 17

    The estimated cost of war is 62 billion dollars. This number is really not an accurate estimate but we can guess.
  • Economic Disillusionment- Gut 19

    The economy was collapsing due to the harsh war reparations. Europe had a problem with the infrastructure and industries were in ruins
  • British At Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14

    British At Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14
    The British caused the outcome of harsh punishment of taking colonies and weakening them in Germany.
  • France at Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14

    France at Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14
    France demanded that Alsace and Lorraine return. They also gained control over of the coal mines in the Saar Basin
  • United States At The Paris Peace Treaty- Gut 14

    United States At The Paris Peace Treaty- Gut 14
    Some outcomes of the Paris Peace Treaty was when Germany protested against the U.S. and naval fleet. the U.S. initially left Germany with 6 ships.
  • Germany Suffering From Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14

    Germany Suffering From Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14
    The outcome of the conference was Germany suffering. The conference was held but Germany was not allowed to attend, in the end they had to pay 30 billion in war reparations and more.
  • Austria-Hungary At Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14

    Austria-Hungary At Paris Peace Conference- Gut 14
    Austria-Hungaria economy was greatly affected by the conference. They were ultimately forbidden to unite with Germany.
  • Austria-Hungary Splits- Gut 16

    At the end of the Paris Peace Treaty, Austria-Hungary split into two different countries and they lost 2/3 of their population
  • Italians Gains- Gut 16

    Italy did not get much out of the peace treaty. However, they did get South Tyrol and 250,00 citizens from Austria-Hungary.
  • Adriatic Land- Gut 16

    Italy requested for the coast of the Adriatic Sea, but they got very little of it.
  • Land Of Shandong- Gut 16

    Japan wanted to get the land of Shangdong, they got this land. But China was outraged because they wanted their land back that Germany took
  • Political Borders- Gut 18

    Political Borders- Gut 18
    Serbia and Montenegro combined and became Yugoslavia. Romania then became its own state and Russian land splits up into three countries; Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania
  • Italian Border- Gut 18

    Italian Border- Gut 18
    At the end of the treaty, the Italian border had no real effect but was slightly moved. They did, however, get South Tyrol and 350,000 Austrian-German.
  • Sick Wilson- Gut 15

    One reason they were unable to attend was because of the Spanish Influenza that Woodrow Wilson had contracted. This then leads to France gaining more power at the treaty of Versailles.
  • What the United States Wanted- Gut 13

    What the United States Wanted- Gut 13
    The U.S. wanted to end secret treaties and the freedom of the seas. They also asked for Polish independence
  • What Great Britain Wanted- Gut 13

    What Great Britain Wanted- Gut 13
    They wanted control of German colonies and for the Germans to pay war reparations. They also wanted revenge and Germany to be punished but not too hard of a punishment.
  • What France Wanted- Gut 13

    What France Wanted- Gut 13
    France wanted control of the left bank of the Rhineland and to cripple German politics. They asked for Germany to pay war reparations and France took over their coal supply in the Saar Basin
  • What Germany Wanted- Gut 13

    What Germany Wanted- Gut 13
    The main thing they wanted was to be present at the treaty. Instead, they could only write a letter about what they wanted (You can guess how that went). Their empire split up and their military was disarmed
  • What The Soviet Union Wanted- Gut 13

    What The Soviet Union Wanted- Gut 13
    They wanted to be involved in the treaty and their lad back that was taken by Germany.
  • League Of Nations- Gut 15

    The League of Nations was formed for all nations to keep the peace. This idea was thought up of by President Wilson but after it was created, the American public rejected and did not join.
  • U.S. Rejection- Gut 15

    When Woodrow Wilson came up with the idea of the League of Nations the idea was to join. The American Public then rejected and this did not only impact the U.S. but it impacted the whole world
  • Not Joining The League of Nations- Gut 15

    The U.S. really had no effect from not joining The League Of Nations. They later signed a peace treaty with Germany, formally ending the war.
  • Ernest Hemingway's Experiences- Gut 20

    Ernest Hemingway's Experiences- Gut 20
    His wartime experiences had many influences and laid the foundation for his novel "A Farwell To Arms"
  • Mills- Gut WINNER

    Mills- Gut WINNER
    On this day at 12:59 I entered mills classroom. Yes, he assigned this project and I want to die, but it's for Lord Mills #Mills4prez #mills