Women’s rights 1776-1920

Timeline created by GhazalEnani
In History
  • Emma Hart Willard

    Emma Hart Willard
    Emma Hart Willard was an American women's rights activist who dedicated her life to education. She worked in several schools and founded the first school for women's higher education, the Troy Female Seminary in Troy, New York. With the success of her school, Willard was able to travel across the country and abroad, to promote education for women. The Troy Female Seminary was renamed the Emma Willard School in 1895 in her honor.
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an American suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the Seneca Falls Convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized women's rights and women's suffrage movements in the United States. Stanton was president of the National Woman Suffrage Association from 1892 until 1900.
  • Susan B. Anthony

    Susan B. Anthony
    Susan Brownell Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
  • Emma Hart Willard opened the first school opened for girls

    Emma Hart Willard opened the first school opened for girls
    Emma Hart Willard opened the Troy Female Seminary in Troy, New York to provide young women with the same higher education as their male peers. Prior to the school's founding, young women had been unable to pursue the advanced curricular offerings in mathematics, classical languages and the sciences that were taught to their male counterparts.
  • The signing of Declaration of Sentiments

    The signing of Declaration of Sentiments
    The first women's rights convention is held in Seneca Falls, New York. After 2 days of discussion and debate, 68 women and 32 men sign a Declaration of Sentiments, which outlines grievances and sets the agenda for the women's rights movement. A set of 12 resolutions is adopted calling for equal treatment of women and men under the law and voting rights for women.
  • "Ain't I a Woman?" by Sojourner Truth

    "Ain't I a Woman?" by Sojourner Truth
    "Ain't I a Woman?" is the name given to a speech, delivered extemporaneously, by Sojourner Truth, born into slavery in New York State. Some time after gaining her freedom in 1827, she became a well known anti-slavery speaker. Her speech was delivered at the Women's Convention in Akron, Ohio,and was not originally known by any title. It was briefly reported in two contemporary newspapers, and a transcript of the speech was published in the Anti-Slavery Bugle on June 21, 1851.
  • National Labor Union Backs

    National Labor Union Backs
    The National Labor Union, one of the first organized labor advocacy groups, pushes for equal pay for equal work, the concept that a woman should be paid the same as the man for the same or equivalent job with the same qualifications.
  • Sojourner Truth

    Sojourner Truth
    Sojourner Truth was an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, Ulster County, New York, but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son, in 1828 she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man.
  • Senates reject proposal

    Senates reject proposal
    For the first time, the Senate hears arguements about allowing women's suffrage. The proposal fails and this is the last time the Senate will hear arguements for 25 years.
  • NAWSA was formed.

    NAWSA was formed.
    The National American Woman Suffrage Association was formed to work for women's suffrage in the United States. It was created by the merger of two existing organizations, the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA).
  • "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

    "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
    The Yellow Wallpaper is a 6,000-word short story first published in The New England Magazine. It is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature, illustrating attitudes in the 19th century toward women's health, both physical and mental.
  • "The Woman's Bible" by Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    "The Woman's Bible" by Elizabeth Cady Stanton
    The Woman's Bible is a two-part non-fiction book, written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and a committee of 26 women, published to challenge the traditional position of religious orthodoxy that woman should be subservient to man.By producing the book, Stanton wished to promote a radical liberating theology, one that stressed self-development. The book attracted a great deal of controversy and antagonism at its introduction.
  • Jeannette Rankin First Woman in Congress

    Jeannette Rankin First Woman in Congress
    Jeannette Rankin is the first woman voted into a government office. She ran for one of two open seats in Congress as a representative for Montana. She won by a slime margin and was the only dissenting vote to go to war in both World War I and World War II.
  • Women pickett the White House

    Women pickett the White House
    Women are so set on getting the right to vote that they went to the White House with pickett signs to protest against the unjust laws regarding voting.
  • 19th Amendment

    19th Amendment
    The U.S. Constitution granted American women the right to vote—a right known as woman suffrage. At the time the U.S. was founded, its female citizens did not share all of the same rights as men, including the right to vote.