Travel Through 1929-1945

Timeline created by SierraB
In History
  • Persons Case

    Persons Case
    Women had many struggles during the 1900s. In 1928, according to the British North America Act, women were not considered ‘persons’. The Persons Case was a ruling that established the right of women to be appointed to the Senate. The case was brought forward by the Famous Five, a group of well-known female activists. On October 18, 1929, as a result of the Persons Case, the British Government recognized Canadian women as persons under the law. This case opened the Senate to Women.
  • Continuity or Change

    This is an example of change because women were not considered person’s and they were never allowed to work in government before but after the person's case that changed. This is a positive impact on women because after the Persons Case, women were then considered persons and couldn’t have their rights denied. Women were then also allowed to work in the government and in both the House of Commons and the Upper House. This was a huge change for all women.
  • Farmers during the Great Depression

    Farmers during the Great Depression
    Farmers faced many challenges during the Great Depression. The Great Depression was a global economic decline that started in 1929 and ended around 1939. There was a massive decline in the stock market after the roaring 20’s between 1929 and 1933. Unemployment increased, prices fell, banks failed, homelessness increased etc. Wheat was in high demand across Canada therefore farmers could sell it for high prices. But a drought hit the prairies in 1929 and it lasted ten years.
  • Continuity or Change pt.2

    The climate changed as well making it hard for farmers. 1930 was the start of a 10-year period of drought and dust storms. The land turned to dust, sweeping away the rich prairie soil and the once-lush fields dried up and the crops burned in the sun.
  • Farmers during the Great Depression pt.2

    There was lack of rain, over farming, high temperatures and plagues of grasshoppers. During this time the farmers could not produce a good harvest. They had little to eat because the conditions were bad and if the crops did harvest they didn’t have enough money to harvest them. This time brought many changes and challenges for farmers. Then, to make things worse between 1931-1941 the Canadian West turned into a ‘Dust Bowl’ and around 250,000 farmers abandoned their farms.
  • Continuity or Change

    This is an example of change. The Great Depression was the longest and most extreme depression the industrial Western world had ever known, resulting in huge changes in economic structures and how economies work. The Great Depression changed millions of lives. There were huge changes that negatively impacted farmers, countries, economies, industries, etc. Farming changed significantly during this time, many farmers lost their jobs or farms and didn’t have enough money to harvest their crops.
  • Women in the Workforce

    Women in the Workforce
    Women played such an important role in the workforce to support the war effort during WWII. Before the Second World War, women had worked and played an important role in WWI as well. Before the war many women were unemployed and would stay at home taking care of their kids and their homes, doing their traditional jobs. Then when the war started, Canada needed everyone to contribute, therefore many women began working overseas or working on the homefront.
  • Continuity or Change

    This is an example of continuity because women worked in the First World War and they continued to work during the Second World War. This had a positive impact on women because they have actively participated in both of the wars, where they often take traditional male work, a pattern that has contributed to the advancement of women’s rights. To add, even minor things stayed the same for example, women still continued to get paid less than men even in the same job.
  • Women in the Workforce pt.2

    Many women had their sons, brothers or husbands overseas so they wanted to join them, other women went because it brought a great sense of pride and strength because they were doing what a man would normally do. Women did many jobs, they worked in airfields, hospitals, factories, transportation stops and farms to produce goods for the war.
  • Indigenous contributions to WWII

    Indigenous contributions to WWII
    Indigenous people from every region of Canada served in the armed forces, fighting in major battles and campaigns. They made lots of contributions to WWII. By 1940, more than 100 of them had volunteered and by the end of the conflict in 1945, over 3,000 First Nations members, as well as an unknown number of Métis, Inuit and other Indigenous recruits, had served in uniform. While some did see action with the Royal Canadian Air Force and Navy, most served in the Canadian Army.
  • Continuity or Change

    This is an example of continuity because when WWII started, many Indigenous people answered the call to join the military just as they had done in the WWI. Indigenous people made lots of contributions to both wars, whether they volunteered or served in uniform. This had a positive impact on Indigenous people because conflict offered them opportunities to renew warrior cultural traditions, prove their worth to non-Indigenous Canadians, break down social barriers and find good jobs.
  • Continuity or Change pt.2

    Indigenous people faced many challenges during the war and those challenges made their achievements all the more notable.
  • Farmers face increase production during WWII

    Farmers face increase production during WWII
    Farmers contributed a lot to WWII. During this time there was an increase in production for farmers. After a long depression they were expected to help the war effort by providing lots of food for the soldiers and their families. During this time, farmers were doing well and making good money. But farmers were being asked to produce much more food with fewer workers. Canadian farmers made these huge contributions to the war effort in spite of shortage of labour.
  • Continuity or Change

    This is an example of change because during the Great Depression farmers were struggling and then during the Second World War things changed and farmers were doing really well. This was a positive change because in the early 1930s prices dropped so low that many farmers went bankrupt and lost their farms but things changed drastically during WWII, farm income was higher than at any time since 1929.
  • Farmers face increase production during WWII pt.2

    Many young people left farms for the army or better paying jobs. However, temporary help from students, home defence soldiers and prisoners of war eased the shortages. By the end of 1941, farm income was higher than at any time since 1929. Between 1940 and 1945, income for farmers increased from $4.4 billion to $12.3 billion.
  • Continuity or Change pt.2

    Another thing that changed for the good was the conditions, the climate and land improved making it easier for farmers to make a harvest and produce crops.
  • Camp Ipperwash

    Camp Ipperwash
    During WWII, the federal government decided to build a military camp on reserve land that belonged to the Stony Point First Nation because they needed more land for military purposes. This land was located in Ipperwash Provincial Park, Ontario. The government had made an offer to the Stony Point First Nation, but they turned it down, because the land had cultural and spiritual significance.
  • Continuity or Change

    This is an example of change because before WWII Stony Point First Nation were living harmoniously and happily on government reserve land. This negatively impacted the Stony Point First Nation because their land was stolen from them by the government. The government said they would return the land but in the years following the war the land was never returned. This led to discontent for the Stony Point First Nation and it continued long after the war ended.
  • Camp Ipperwash pt.2

    The government stole the land but assured the Stony Point First Nation that it would be returned to them. However, the land was not returned in the years following the war, and in 1993, members of the Stony Point First Nation began to occupy the land at what was now referred to as “Camp Ipperwash.”
  • Bibliography

    12, Tim Rogers September. “Dusting off the History of Drought on the Canadian Prairies in the 1930s.” Active History, 28 Nov. 2016, https://activehistory.ca/2016/11/dusting-off-the-history-of-drought-on-the-canadian-prairies-in-the-1930s/.
    Farmers Produce More Food for War in World War II, https://livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe40s/money_02.html.
    “Canadian Women and War.” The Canadian Encyclopedia, https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/women-and-war.
  • Bibliography

  • Bibliography

    Wilson, Paul. “PAUL WILSON: Camp Ipperwash - My Long-Ago Summer on Stolen Land.” Thespec.com, 21 July 2015, https://www.thespec.com/life/2015/07/21/paul-wilson-camp-ipperwash-my-long-ago-summer-on-stolen-land.html.
    Museum, Canadian War. “The War Economy and Controls: Agriculture.” WarMuseum.ca - Democracy at War - Agriculture - Canada and the War, https://www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/exhibitions/newspapers/canadawar/agriculture_e.html.
  • Bibliography

    “Indigenous Peoples and the Second World War.” The Canadian Encyclopedia, https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/indigenous-peoples-and-the-second-world-war.
    Amadeo, Kimberly. “How the Lows of the Great Depression Still Affect Us Today.” The Balance, 30 June 2020, https://www.thebalance.com/effects-of-the-great-depression-4049299.