Timeline of Major Ethical Philosophies

Timeline created by janmichael
In History
  • 469 BCE

    SOCRATES

    SOCRATES
    A classical Philosopher
  • Period: 469 BCE to 399 BCE

    Socrates' Philosophy

    "No one commits an evil act knowingly and doing wrong arises out of ignorance."
    Socrates believed that if one knows what the good is, one will always do what is good. If one understands the meaning of courage, self-control, or justice, one will act in a courageous, self-controlled and just manner.
  • 428 BCE

    PLATO

    PLATO
    A classical philospher
  • Period: 428 BCE to 348 BCE

    Plato's Philosophy

    Plato maintains a virtue-based eudaemonistic conception of ethics. Happiness, of well-being is the highest aim of moral thought and conduct, and the virtues are the requisite skills and dispositions needed to attain it. He see ethics as concern to act rightly and live a good life. That in every way we can achieve success, we must have virtues imbued in it.
  • 384 BCE

    ARISTOTLE

    ARISTOTLE
    A classical Philosopher
  • Period: 384 BCE to 322 BCE

    Aristotle's Philosophy

    Simply known as "The First Teacher and was "The Philosopher," Aristotle's ethics is concerned with actions conducive to man's good. His "Golden Mean Principle" states that to be happy, live a life of moderation.
  • THOMAS HOBBES

    THOMAS HOBBES
    A classical Philospher
  • Period: to

    Moral Positivism

    Hobbes' moral positivism anticipates the chaotic outcome if laws are not abided. According to him, people would act on their evil impulses if left alone for themselves; therefore, they should not be trusted to make decisions on their own. Laws are created to maintain order and produce morally effective decisions.
  • JEREMY BENTHAM AND JOHN STUART MILL

    JEREMY BENTHAM AND JOHN STUART MILL
    Jeremy Bentham (1748 - 1832)
    John Stuart Mill (1806 - 1873)
    The Founders of Modern Utilitarianism
  • Period: to

    Utilitarianism

    Derived from the Latin words 'utile bonum' or 'utilis, which means usefulness, the utilitarian ethics is best explained by the maxim, "Do whatever produces the greatest good for the greatest number." The theory argues that what makes an act right is its consequences and not the motive of action. The effects or consequences determine
    the goodness or badness of an action. An act is good when
    it gives good results, if it works, if it makes you successful, and
    if it makes you attain your purpose.