Abnormal

The History of Abnormal Psychology

  • 100

    Ancient Theories B.C.

    Ancient Theories B.C.
    In ancient Egypt they believed spirits and gods caused behavioral issures and in some cultures proacticed trephination. A practice of making holes in the person suffering from the behavor to allow the evil spirits to escape.
  • 130

    Melampus of Pilus Organic Model 1300 B.C.

    Melampus of Pilus Organic Model 1300 B.C.
    Around 1300 B.C. Melampus of Pilus introduce an organic treatment of mental illnes using plants . Root extract for "agitated uterine melancholia" and iron powder for "traumatic impotense". This lead to temples errected in honor of Asclepius the god of healing. These temples were known as santuaries for the mentally ill and offered biological and psychological treatments like mandrake root , music, and dream interpretation.
  • 460

    Hippocrates Diagnostic Classification System 460-377 B.C.

    Hippocrates Diagnostic Classification System 460-377 B.C.
    Hippocrates came up with a diagnostic classification system to explain abnormal behavior. He identified common psychological symptoms such as hallucinations, melancholia, delusions, and mania which are still used today.
  • Aug 28, 980

    Avicenna Humane Treatment 980-1037 A.D.

    Avicenna Humane Treatment 980-1037 A.D.
    Avicenna theory that depression is a result of mixws humors or imbalanced chemicals in the body were caused by emotional distress. His beliefs the benefits of music on emotional distress fwould take Europe 600 years to graspe. The idea of Humane Treatment for the Mentally Ill.
  • Aug 28, 1400

    Progress Ignored during The Witch Hunts of 1400s-1700s

    Progress  Ignored during The Witch Hunts of 1400s-1700s
    In medeival Europe there was an epidemic of wars, plagues, social oppression, and famine. It was easier for the churches and those suffering to blame those they did not understand and lable them witches doing the devils work. In a 300 year period 100,000 were put to death, approximately 80-85% of were women many of those accused probably suffered from psychological disorders.
  • Aug 28, 1515

    A Transformation in Treatment

    A Transformation in Treatment
    A Transformation in Treatment of Mental illness can be traced back to Johann Weyer(1515-1588) and Paracelsus(1493-1541). Paracelsus refuted that abnormal behaviors were linked to demonic possession. Paracelsus believed that some mental disorders could be hereditary and soem physical illnesses had a psychological origin. Weyer is the first physical to specialize in the treatment of mental illness
  • Finally Humane Treatment No More Chains

    Finally Humane Treatment No More Chains
    Philippe Pinel(1745-1826) and William Tuke change the approach to treatment of mental illness. From his experience as a director of and asylum for men Pinel concluded that mental illnesses can be cured with the proper treatment. He proposed for a psychologist to listen to them, productive activites to such as work or occupational therapy and restful sleep with the asylum wall instead of restraints. William Tuke established the York Retreat which allowed the mentall ill a place to live and work
  • The Introduction of Etiology and Prognosis

    The Introduction of Etiology and Prognosis
    Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926) introduces two diagnosti categories based on both the symptoms but also the etiology(cause) and prognosis(progression and outcome).
  • Freud Introduces Psychoanalysis

    Freud Introduces Psychoanalysis
    Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) introduces psychoanalysis a comprhensive theory that tries to explain the normal and abnormal behavior. This theory had three important aspects: the structure of the mind, how the mind copes or deals with threats, and the stages of psychological development of the behavior.
  • Little Albert's Fear of White Rats

    Little Albert's Fear of White Rats
    In 1908 John B Watson (1878-1958) developed a view known as Behaviorism based on the principals that all behavior (normal or abnormal) is learned as a result of experiences or interactions with ones environment. The study of Little Albert in 1920 is a prime example of that they paired a white rat with a loud sound or aversive noise scaring Little Albert.