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Shogunate Japan Timeline

By 010023
  • Period: May 1, 794 to

    Shogunate Japan

  • Apr 26, 795

    Heian-kyo (Kyoto) Became Capital~ 794

    Heian-kyo (Kyoto) Became Capital~ 794
    Emperor Kammu moved the capital from Nara to Kyoto in order to prevent the political intervention of old Buddhist powers located in Nara. He also supported the overseas education of students in China during the Tang Dynasty to study new schools of Buddhism.
  • May 30, 1192

    Minamoto Yorimoto Appointed Shogun, Led Government which Became Known as Shogunate~ 1192

    Minamoto Yoritomo was appointed shogun in the year 1192 and established a new government, the Kamakura Bakufu. The new feudal government was organized in a simpler way than the one in Kyoto and worked much more efficient under Japanese conditions.
  • Oct 14, 1274

    The Mongols, Led by Kublai Khan, Attempt to Invade Japan, but Fail when a Typhoon Destroys much of the Mongol Navy~ 1274

    The Mongols, Led by Kublai Khan, Attempt to Invade Japan, but Fail when a Typhoon Destroys much of the Mongol Navy~ 1274
    From the port of Masan in southern Korea, the Mongols launched an attack on Japan in the autumn of 1274. Hundreds of large ships and an even larger number of small boats- estimated between 500 and 900 in number- set out into the Sea of Japan. A pair of typhoons that each wrecked a Mongol fleet attempting to invade Japan. The storms destroyed most of the Mongol ships and dispersed the rest, forcing the attackers to abandon their plans and saving Japan from foreign conquest.
  • May 1, 1336

    The Ashikago Shogunate Takes Power~ 1336

    The Ashikago Shogunate Takes Power~ 1336
    The Ashikaga Shogunate was an era of great cultural development as the military-feudal samurai of the shogun's government associated with the cultured civilians of the emperor's court at Kyoto. Zen culture dominated this era, and produced major cultural developments, including masterpieces of literature and art, and Japan's unique landscape gardening, the art of flower arrangement (ikebana), and the tea ceremony.
  • May 20, 1467

    The Onin War Occurs~ 1467

    The Onin War Occurs~ 1467
    By 1467 the Ashikaga dynasty of shoguns in Japan had grown so weak that a succession dispute provided the trigger for a civil war, the Onin War, and the collapse of central authority. The civil war, largely fought within the imperial capital of Kyōto, was the precursor of the so-called Age of Warring States.
  • Japan Invades Korea~ 1592

    Japan Invades Korea~ 1592
    The invasions were launched by Toyotomi Hideyoshi with the intent of conquering Joseon Dynasty Korea and Ming Dynasty China. Japan quickly succeeded in occupying the Korean Peninsula, but the numerical superiority of the combined Ming and Joseon armies eventually resulted in a withdrawal towards coastal areas and a military stalemat.
  • Japan Becomes Isolated from the World~ 1635

    Japan Becomes Isolated from the World~ 1635
    Japan's isolation policy was applied by Tokugawa Iemitsu. He issued edicts that closed Japan to foreigners and prevented Japanese from leaving. The first of the following two documents, the first of Iemitsu's edicts, is directed to the commissioners of Nagasaki, a port city in southern Japan and a center of Christianity; the second deals with the continuing missionary efforts of Portuguese Jesuits, who refused to abandon their activities despite the regime's persecution.
  • Mount Fuji Erupts~ 1707

    Mount Fuji Erupts~ 1707
    On 26th October 1707 there was a magnitude 8.4 earthquake hit Honshu, Japan. This was followed by several smaller earthquakes around Mt Fuji. An eruption began on 16th December 1707 on the SE flank of the volcano accompanied by pumice fall. After 6 hours the pumice fall changed to scoria fall. On the first day of the eruption, 72 houses and three Buddhist temples were destroyed in the town of Subassiri 10 km from the volcano.
  • Japan's Isolationism Comes to an End~ 1854

    Japan's Isolationism Comes to an End~ 1854
    In Tokyo, Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, signs the Treaty of Kanagawa with the Japanese government, opening the ports of Shimoda and Hakodate to American trade and permitting the establishment of a U.S. consulate in Japan.
  • British Merchant Charles Richardson is Killed Starting a Conflict Between Britain and Japan~ 1862

    British Merchant Charles Richardson is Killed Starting a Conflict Between Britain and Japan~ 1862
    In 1862, in a bid to negotiate the postponement of the opening of Japanese cities and ports to foreign countries, the shogunate dispatched an embassy to the United Kingdom and five other European treaty partner countries, which had forced Japan to immediately open its ports to them. Led by Yasunori Takeuchi, governor of the Shimotsuke region, the Takeuchi Embassy to Europe comprised a total of 38 members, including Yukichi Fukuzawa and Gen'ichiro Fukuchi.
  • References 1:

    Japan-guidecom. (2017). Japan-guidecom. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2133.html
    Thoughtcocom. (2017). ThoughtCo. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from https://www.thoughtco.com/the-mongol-invasions-of-japan-195559
    Louis-chorca. (2017). Louis-chorca. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from http://www.louis-chor.ca/mongolin.htm
    Pacificwarorgau. (2017). Pacificwarorgau. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from http://www.pacificwar.org.au/foundationJapmilaggro/Shogunate.html
  • References 2:

    Britannicacom. (2017). Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from https://www.britannica.com/event/Onin-War
    Onwarcom. (2017). Onwarcom. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from https://www.onwar.com/aced/chrono/c1500s/yr90/Japaneseinvasionsofkorea1592.htm
    Wfuedu. (2017). Wfuedu. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from http://users.wfu.edu/watts/w03_Japancl.html
    Volcanolivecom. (2017). Volcanolivecom. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from http://www.volcanolive.com/fuji.html
  • References 3:

    Historycom. (2017). Historycom. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/treaty-of-kanagawa-signed-with-japan
    Ndlgojp. (2017). Ndlgojp. Retrieved 1 May, 2017, from http://www.ndl.go.jp/exposition/e/s1/1862-1.html