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History of Management (General Motors)

By ekadlec
  • Scientific Management Theory

    Scientific Management Theory
    The Scientific Management Theory was founded in 1890 by Frederick W. Taylor. This theory was based upon proven facts. Taylor was an important figure in the history of management. He created four principles to increase efficiency in the workplace. Locke, E. A. (1982). The Ideas of Frederick W. Taylor: An Evaluation. Academy of Management Review, 7(1), 14-24. doi:10.5465/AMR.1982.4285427
  • Carnegie Steel Company

    Carnegie Steel Company
    At the age of 30, Andrew Carnegie was offered the job of superintendent of the whole railroad. Aside from his top job, he had ambitions elsewhere. In 1892 he created Carnegie Steel Company, the first low-cost Bessemer steelmaking plant in the U.S. In 1900, most of his competitors had been driven out of business because of his low prices. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Around the age of 57, Andrew Carnegie
  • General Motors was founded

    General Motors was founded
    William C. Durant was the founder of General Motors on September 16, 1908. Prior to making his debut in the automobile industry, he was a leading manufacturer of horse-drawn vehicles. Durant was the head of the Buick Motor Company, and spent $2000 to incorporate GM in New Jersey.
  • Taylor and Lillian Gilbreth

    Taylor and Lillian Gilbreth
    The Gilbreths enhanced Taylor's inquiry of work movements and made contributions to time-and-motion study. Their goals were to evaluate each action required to perform a specific task and break it down into component actions, develop better ways to perform each action, and reorganize each of the actions so that ultimately they can be performed more efficiently. The improved the productivity of workers. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Fordism - Henry Ford

    Fordism - Henry Ford
    Henry Ford was an American Industrialist and the fonder of the Ford Motor Company. The word "fordism" was created for his new approach in the workplace. He cut the workday from nine to eight hours, and doubled the daily wage from $2.50 to $5.00. This change assured Ford Motor Company that they were extremely profitable; everyone was flocking to Ford. Henry Ford. (2010). Product Design & Development, 65(7), 26-27.
  • Fayol's Principles

    Fayol's Principles
    Henri Fayol was the Chief Executive Officer of Comambault Mining. He acknowledged fourteen principles that he believed to be key to increase the efficiency of the management process. The principles included division of labor, authority and responsibility, unity of command, line of authority, centralization, unity of direction, equity, order, initiative, discipline, recumeration of personnel, stability of tenure of personnel, subordination of individual interests, and esprit de corps.
  • Behavioral Management Theory

    Behavioral Management Theory
    Behavioral management refers to how managers should act to portray motivation and encourage workers to perform more efficiently to accomplish organization goals. Mary Parker Follett is considered the mother of management. She believes that because workers are the most knowledgeable about their jobs, they should be involved in job analysis and managers should allow them to participate in the work development process. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Comp
  • Theory of Bureaucracy - Max Weber

    Theory of Bureaucracy - Max Weber
    Max Weber created the principles of bureaucracy to help Germany manage its developing industrial enterprises while it was yearning to become a world power. There are five principlesm - the first being, a manager's formal authority derives from the position he/she holds in the organization. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • The Hawthorne Studies

    One series of studies, the Hawthorne Studies, was presented from 1924-1932 at the Hawthorne Works of the Western Electric Company. These studies began as an attempt to research how characteristics of the work setting affect worker performance and fatigue. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Theory X

    Theory X
    Around the time of 1960, studies revealed how assumptions about workers' attitudes and behavior affect managers' behavior. Theory X provides the assumptions that the average worker is lazy and dislikes work. The managers job is to counteract workers' natural tendencies to avoid work. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Theory Y

    Theory Y
    Around the time of 1960, studies revealed how assumptions about workers' attitudes and behavior affect managers' behavior. Theory Y provides the assumption that workers are not lazy, and will do what is good for the organization, when given the opportunity. Managers should make sure workers have the resources necessary to achieve organizational goals. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Management Science Theory

    The Management Science Theory focuses on the use of several techniques to help managers make maximum use of resources to produce goods and services. This theory includes quantitative management, operations management, total quality management, management information systems.
  • The Open-Systems View

    The open-systems view is affected by an organizations external environment. It was developed by Daniel Katz, Robert Kahn, and James Thompson.
  • Contingency Theory

    Tom Burns and G. M. Stalker in Britain, and Paul Lawrence adn Jay Lorsch in the U.S. developed the Contingency Theory. The main message that is portrayed through this theory is that "there is no one best way to organize." Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Equal Pay Act

    Requires that men and women be paid equally if they are performing equal work. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act

    Title VII does not allow discrimination in any employment decisions on the basis of demographics. Demographics such as race, religion, sex, color, national origin. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Age Discrimination in Employment Act

    This act prohibits discrimination against workers over the age of 40 and restricts required retirement. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Pregnancy Discrimination Act

    The Pregnancy Discrimination Act excludes discrimination against women in employment decisions on the basis of pregnancy and related medical decisions. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Americans with Disabilities Act

    Excludes discrimination against individuals who are disabled, in employment decisions and requires that employers/managers make accomodations for disabled workers to allow them to perform their jobs more efficiently. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Civil Rights Act

    Prohibits discrimination and allows for the awarding of punishments and compensatory damages in cases of intentional discrimination. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Family and Medical Leave Act

    Requires that employers provide approximately twelve weeks of unpaid leave for medical and family issues. Jones, G. M. (2014) Contemporary Management. New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • SWOT Analysis

    The SWOT Analysis is an essential tool which allows managers to seek an organizations strengths, weaknesses, opportunites and threats.
  • GM cuts costs

    In July 2008, GM announces plan to cut costs by $10 billion and raise $5 billion through borrowing and asset sales. This relates back to the term "fordism."
  • GM - Largest Public Offering

    GM - Largest Public Offering
    GM completed the world's largest initial public offering, bringing forth a solid financial foundation which allows them to produce great products for their customers. This accomplishment relates to several of Fayol's Principles of Management - centralization and discipline are the top two.
  • First woman named CEO of GM

    First woman named CEO of GM
    Mary Barra, ranked 35th on Forbes list of "most powerful women." Barra has been working for GM since 1980, and gradually worked her way up the corporate ladder. She is familiar with several areas in the GM industry, which makes her an asset. This refers to the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.