History of Photography

Timeline created by shelbycooley
In Film
  • Joseph Nicephore Niepce makes first photographic image.

    Joseph Nicephore Niepce makes first photographic image.
    Niepce placed an engraving onto a metal plate coated in bitumen, and then exposed it to light. The shadowy areas of the engraving blocked light, but the whiter areas permitted light to react with the chemicals on the plate. When Niepce placed the metal plate in a solvent, gradually an image, until then invisible, appeared. However, Niepce's photograph required eight hours of light exposure to create and after appearing would soon fade away.
  • Louis Daguerre invents faster, longer lasting photograph

    Louis Daguerre invents faster, longer lasting photograph
    He was also experimenting to find a way to capture an image, but it would take him another dozen years before Daguerre was able to reduce exposure time to less than 30 minutes and keep the image from disappearing afterwards.
  • Louis Daguerre invents the start of modern photography.

    Louis Daguerre invents the start of modern photography.
    Daguerre developed a more convenient and effective method of photography, naming it after himself - the daguerreotype.
  • Henry Fox Talbot invents negative to positive process.

    Henry Fox Talbot invents negative to positive process.
    In 1841, he perfected this paper-negative process and called it a calotype, Greek for beautiful picture.
  • Frederick Scoff Archer created the wet plate negative.

    Frederick Scoff Archer created the wet plate negative.
    Using a viscous solution of collodion, he coated glass with light-sensitive silver salts. Because it was glass and not paper, this wet plate created a more stable and detailed negative.
  • Hamilton Smith invents tintypes.

    Hamilton Smith invents tintypes.
    A thin sheet of iron was used to provide a base for light-sensitive material, yielding a positive image.
  • George Eastman invented flexible roll film.

     George Eastman invented flexible roll film.
    film with a base that was flexible, unbreakable, and could be rolled. Emulsions coated on a cellulose nitrate film base, such as Eastman's, made the mass-produced box camera a reality.
  • commercially viable color films

    commercially viable color films
    In the early 1940s, commercially viable color films (except Kodachrome, introduced in 1935) were brought to the market. These films used the modern technology of dye-coupled colors in which a chemical process connects the three dye layers together to create an apparent color image.