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history of broadcasting

  • K.F Braun invents the cathode-ray tube.

    K.F Braun invents the cathode-ray tube.
    is a vacuum tube containing an electron gun (a source of electrons or electron emitter) and a fluorescent screen used to view images. It has a means to accelerate and deflect the electron beam onto the fluorescent screen to create the images. The image may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets and others.
  • Reginald Fessenden invents the wireless Telephony

    Reginald Fessenden invents the wireless Telephony
    Reginald Aubrey Fessenden - who was recognized as the "father" of radio and as the first to actually transmit the sound of the human voice without wires.
  • The Radio Act of 1912 assigns three- and four-letter codes to radio stations.

    The Radio Act of 1912 assigns three- and four-letter codes to radio stations.
  • KDKA, a Pittsburgh Westinghouse station, transmits the first commercial radio broadcast.

    KDKA, a Pittsburgh Westinghouse station, transmits the first commercial radio broadcast.
    KDKA is currently owned and operated by CBS Radio and its studios are located at the combined CBS Radio Pittsburgh facility on Foster Drive in Green Tree.
  • U.S. Radio Act of 1927 is signed forming the Federal Radio Commission.

    U.S. Radio Act of 1927 is signed forming the Federal Radio Commission.
    U.S. Radio Act of 1927 is signed forming the Federal Radio Commission.
  • Philo T. Farnsworth receives a patent for television .

    Philo T. Farnsworth receives a patent for television .
    Philo Farnsworth was an American inventor and television pioneer. Although he made many contributions that were crucial to the early development of all-electronic television, he is perhaps best known for inventing the first fully functional all-electronic image pickup device (video camera tube), the "image dissector", the first fully functional and complete all-electronic television system, and for being the first person to demonstrate such a system to the public.
  • Edwin Armstrong demonstrates FM radio.

    Edwin Armstrong demonstrates FM radio.
  • The Federal Communications Commission is formed to govern U.S. broadcasting .

    As part off the Communications Act of 1934, the Federal Communications Commission is formed to govern U.S. broadcasting .
  • FCC authorizes 525-line, black and white TV in U.S.

  • Cable TV (CATV) is introduced in Pennsylvania and Oregon.

  • FCC approves RCA's color TV system and rescinds a 1950 decision on the CBS color system

  • Ampex demonstrates the first practical videotape recorder in Redwood City, CA .

  • Fiber optic technology introduced that greatly expands point-to-point audio and video transmissions .

    Fiber optic technology introduced that greatly expands point-to-point audio and video transmissions .
  • Direct satellite broadcasts to homes begin.

    Direct satellite broadcasts to homes begin.
  • Internet radio and TV start .

    Internet radio and TV start .
  • Digital (including wide-screen HDTV) television broadcasting starts in the U.S.

  • 1,000 TV stations.

    More than 1,000 U.S. digital TV stations are on the air and television enjoys it's first major technological change in decades. Consumers start buying HDTV sets in significant numbers.
  • Broadcast TV in the U.S. goes all-digital; most analog TV transmitters are shut down.

  • 3-D TV sets go on sale in the U.S, possibly opening a new era in TV programming.

    3-D TV sets go on sale in the U.S, possibly opening a new era in TV programming.