Civil rights movement

Civil Rights Movement

  • White Primary abolished in GA

    White Primary abolished in GA
    “The White Primary was a way of allowing only whites to vote in the primary elections. The whites had chosen the candidates already for the general elections.” In the Constitution it didn’t say anything about the primary elections, so blacks were banned from voting. By doing this the government only followed the 15th Amendment. In 1946, “the White Primary was abolished when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that it was unconstitutional.”
  • White Primary is abolished in GA

    White Primary is abolished in GA
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  • Integration of the Armed Forces

    Integration of the Armed Forces
    The United States’ armed forces haven’t always been integrated. Up until 1948, during WW2, our troops were trained and segregated. There were three reasons to ultimately integrate troops. These three reasons were: “the manpower needed to fight in the Korean War, the needs to reduce racial tension in the military, and segregation to cut the United States’ stature during the Cold War.” President Truman was the person the finally who signed the order to integrate all armed forces.
  • Integration of the Armed Forces

    Integration of the Armed Forces
    Our armed forces are now all integrated and work very well together to keep us safe. (INFORMATION) Picture(
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  • Brown vs. Board of Education

    Brown vs. Board of Education
    The Brown vs. Board of Education was a major turning point in American history. This case overturned the Plessy vs. Ferguson case about schools being segregated. The Brown vs. Board of Education’s goal was to integrate schools and not have separate schools for whites and blacks. The U.S. Supreme Court made this decision and was involved in this case and so were many state courts. The result of this decision was to integrate the schools which allowed blacks and whites to be in the same classroom.
  • Brown vs. Board of Education

    Brown vs. Board of Education
    Informationibrary.thinkquest.org/J0112391/brown_v__board_of_education.htmen.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_v._Board_of_Education(INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
    Rosa Parks was a seamstress who worked in Montgomery, Alabama. One day she was coming home from work and sat down on the bus. There wasn’t enough room for any more white passengers in the “whites only” section, so all the blacks had to move. However, Rosa didn’t move when a white man asked her to. The police, Rosa, and a white man were involved. She was arrested for not moving from her seat. On the day of her trial, all blacks had a bus boycott in Montgomery.
  • Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
    The result of this boycott was that bus income decreased 65%. Eventually, the government decided to finally have buses be integrated on a first-come first-serve basis. Information( INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • The Murder of Emmett Till

    The Murder of Emmett Till
    Emmett Till was murdered at the age of fourteen. He faced discrimination in his hometown of Chicago, IL. However, in August of 1955, he discovered the discrimination in Mississippi was much greater than Chicago. He went down near the city of Money, Mississippi to visit some relatives. He met some local boys and showed them a photo of his white girlfriend, and they challenged Emmett to go and talk to a white girl in a store. As he was leaving, he said, “Bye, baby” to the store owner’s wife.
  • The Murder of Emmett Till

    The Murder of Emmett Till
    This turned into a big mistake.
    Two days later, the storeowner, Roy Bryant, and J.W. Milam, his brother-in-law, kidnapped Emmett. They arrived somewhere near the Tallahatchie River where “three days later Emmett’s body was found.” These two men had left Emmett’s body in a horrific manner. “His head was completely crushed with a bullet still in his head and one eye was missing.” The body was in such bad shape that the only reason Till’s uncle could recognize him was because of his initialed ring.
  • The Murder of Emmett Till

    The Murder of Emmett Till
    This murder took place, because of Emmett talking to a white woman that way. Mississippi took segregation to a whole new level and that left Emmett dead because of his words.
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  • Change to Georgia's State Flag

    Change to Georgia's State Flag
    In 1955, John Sammons Bell suggested the idea of a new state flag. “He wanted the flag to incorporate the Confederate Battle Flag.” These new flags stars were bigger and had a different version of the state seal. This flag went into place on February 13, 1956. They changed the flag because Georgia was a part of the War between the States.
    Information(INFORMATION)
  • Change to Georgia's State Flag

    Change to Georgia's State Flag
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  • Crisis at Central High School and the "Little Rock Nine"

    Crisis at Central High School and the "Little Rock Nine"
    The Little Rock Nine were 9 African American students who were going to be making their first appearance in Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. There were many protesters outside of the school yelling and screaming insults at them. They were going into an all white school where many were taunted and discriminated by their classmates. The crisis came into play where several attempts were made to not allow these students to integrate the school.
  • Crisis at Central High School and the "Little Rock Nine"

    Crisis at Central High School and the "Little Rock Nine"
    President Dwight D. Eisenhower heard about all the commotion. On September 3, 1957, he ordered thousands of troops to safely allow these nine students to go into their new high school. Out of the nine students, eight successfully finished their year at Central High School. Information(INFORMATION)
  • Crisis at Central High School and the "Little Rock Nine"

    Crisis at Central High School and the "Little Rock Nine"
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  • Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in ATL bombed

    Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in ATL bombed
    The Hebrew Benevolent congregation was a Jewish Temple in Atlanta and was one the of oldest and wealthiest temples. The bombing of their building occurred on October 12, 1958 at 3:45 in the morning. Approximately 50 dynamite sticks were dropped onto the building and it was completely ruined. The building was demolished by 5 white men who were tried. They targeted this building because they believed that blacks and Jews were aliens.
  • Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in ATL bombed

    Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in ATL bombed
    They made a call and told them that they were going to bomb any building that didn’t fire their black employees. The person who received this call didn’t take it seriously and didn’t do anything about it. This was a major event in our civil rights movement. Information(INFORMATION) Picture
  • Sit-ins begin in Greensboro, NC

    Sit-ins begin in Greensboro, NC
    Sit-ins are an act of occupying the seats or an area of a segregated establishment to protest racial discrimination. Sit-ins are a non-violent way to protest the problem of segregation. It all started with four male freshmen. Their names were Ezell Blair, Joseph McNeil, Eula Hudgens and Ralph Johns. These four men had all planned the first sit-in to protest racial discrimination in Greensboro, NC.This non-violent protest took place on February 1, 1960. They encountered some problems, however.
  • Sibley Commission

    Sibley Commission
    This commission was established by Governor Vandiver to “gauge Georgia’s attitude towards desegregating the public schools system.” The commission was used to force schools to integrate, or else they had to close their doors. While many schools didn’t want to integrate they also didn’t want to close their doors to students. The Commission’s findings included the practicality of integrating schools with Federal intervention, while keeping the schools open and running.
  • Sit-ins begin in Greensboro, NC

    Sit-ins begin in Greensboro, NC
    The students arrived at the place where sit-ins would become a way of protesting. The students arrived and were refused service and asked to leave. They left and “told campus leaders at Agricultural and Technical College what had happened at the sit-in.” The next day more and more people started coming to this store and mobbing the counters. White men spoke rudely and disrespectfully while these protests went on.
  • Sit-ins begin in Greensboro, NC

    Sit-ins begin in Greensboro, NC
    The result of these sit-ins were, slowly blacks were able to sit at the same counters as whites! <a Information' >Information</a>(INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • Sibley Commission

    Sibley Commission
    An example of the Sibley Commission is UGA. UGA was one of the schools going under forced integration. The school didn’t want integration, so they were going to have to close down. However, many students didn’t want to see the school close, so they supported information(INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • Freedom Rides

    Freedom Rides
    The Freedom Rides were ways of protesting segregation through transportation. The first Freedom Ride took place on May 4, 1961. It involved seven blacks and six whites. The blacks and whites were going down to the Deep South to test the rule about integration on buses and rail stations. During the first few days, they had very little issues. However, when they arrived to Montgomery, AL they were attacked by 1,000+ whites.
  • Integration of the University of Georgia

    Integration of the University of Georgia
    Up until 1961, the University of Georgia had been segregated just like any other school. The idea of integrating the university came about by a district court judge, W. A. Bootle. He was demanding that the university allow students, Hamilton Homes and Charlayne Hunter, to enroll in the school. “There were many rumors that came about because several years ago laws were passed stating that any school who allowed a black student to enter wouldn’t receive any state funds.”
  • Albany Movement

    Albany Movement
    The Albany Movement was led by a man named William G. Anderson. “Local activists, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the NAACP, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the SCLC were all involved in the movement.” This movement took place in Albany, Georgia. It was protesting every part of segregation that existed, especially in Albany, Georgia. Police officers became involved by arresting many of the protestors.
  • Freedom Rides

    Freedom Rides
    They continued on into Mississippi where they suffered “jail terms,” but the freedom rides didn’t stop there. By the end of the summer the freedom rides had increased to train stations and airports. “In November, the Interstate Commerce Commission issued rules that prohibited segregation through any type of transportation.[Information](http://”www.core-online.org/History/freedom rides.htm -)(INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • Integration of the University of Georgia

    Integration of the University of Georgia
    There were rumors about the school even closing its doors. On January 11th, a mad mob went to Hunter’s dorm and caused a lot of property damage. Because of this, “they repealed laws of supporting integrated Information(INFORMATION) Picture
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  • Albany Movement

    Albany Movement
    There were mass amounts of jailing, but the officers didn’t want to attract much national attention so they didn’t do anything violent. Although these protests didn’t succeed, the movement continued to work towards blacks becoming more equal. n.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albany_Movement –(INFORMATION) http://thealbanyjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/030911VintageAlbanyFeedom-445x400.jpg(PICTURE)
  • Birmingham, AL protests

    Birmingham, AL protests
    The Southern Christian Leadership Conference organized protests that occurred in Birmingham. “These protests were organized to bring attention to the unequal treatment of blacks.” Birmingham was one of the WORST cities that blacks lived in. There was such high discrimination that many people couldn’t stand the thought of blacks. Many protestors were arrested, attacked and had water jets sprayed on them at high-pressure. “For children, police dogs were used.”
  • March on Washington, DC

    March on Washington, DC
    “The March on Washington, DC took place for blacks to have an equal opportunity for jobs and freedom.” CORE, SCLC, SNCC, NAACP and the National Urban League were all involved. About a quarter of a million people showed up, 25% of them being white. “The purpose of the march was to eliminate racial segregation, integrate public schools, for laws to prohibit racial segregation and protection for demonstrators against police officer brutality.”
  • John F. Kennedy assasscinated

    John F. Kennedy assasscinated
    President John F. Kennedy was assassinated at 12:30 p.m.. He was shot in Dealey Plaza, Dallas, Texas. He was killed by a man named Lee Harvey Oswald. Many believe that he was shot because of conspiracy. He was shot while traveling with his wife. Before Oswald’s trial, Jack Ruby shot him. Information(INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • Birmingham, AL Protests

    Birmingham, AL Protests
    A ton of media was brought to Birmingham and attacks were publicized. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birmingham_campaign –(INFORMATION) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/74/Birmingham_campaign_dogs.jpg/300px-Birmingham_campaign_dogs.jpg( PICTURE)
  • Asssscination of Medgar Evans

    Asssscination of Medgar Evans
    Medgar Evans was an African American civil rights leader, soldier in WW2, and was a worker in the NAACP. “He lived in Jackson, Mississippi and was murdered in his own driveway!” A white man named Byron De La Beckwith shot him. Evans was a major target to get rid of because of his stance on civil rights. Many whites wanted to kill him because he was black and wanted segregation to end. Beckwith was trialed three times.
  • Assassination of Medgar Evans

    Assassination of Medgar Evans
    In his first two trials he was declared innocent, but he trialed again at the age of 70 and was convicted of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment.

    [Information](www.history.com/this-day-in-history/medgar-evers-assassinatedhttp://www.pbs.org/newshour/media/clarion/kc_evers.html)(INFORMATION) Picture
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  • March on Washington DC

    March on Washington DC
    The result of the march was the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and civil rights bills were passed.[Information](www.infoplease.com/spot/marchonwashington.htmlwiki.answers.com/.../What_were_the_outcomes_of_the_march_on_ Washington)(INFORMATION) Picture
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  • 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham bombed

    16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham bombed
    In Birmingham, AL, a tragic event occurred on September 15, 1963. A Baptist Church was bombed. The church had become a main target because it was one of the main places for civil rights activities to occur. These people wanted to take down such an important building to try and stop the civil rights movement from continuing. The bombing killed four girls and injured 22. Everything was destroyed except one stained glass window that showed Christ. The bombers were sentenced to life imprisonment.
  • 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham bombed

    16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham bombed
    [Information](en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_Street_Baptist_Church_bombing)
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  • Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed

    Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed
    The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was a major part of the Civil Rights Movement. It covered the outlawing of discrimination of women and racial segregation. “It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public ("public accommodations"). President John F. Kennedy brought up the idea of this bill. Since he was assassinated, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the final act.
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed

    Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed
    Finally, blacks could be treated [Information](equally!en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Rights_Act_of_1964 –)(INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • The murder of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman & Michael Schwerner

    The murder of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman & Michael Schwerner
    James Chaney was a 21-year old black Mississippian; Andrew Goodman was a 20-year old white that lived in New York as well as Michael Schwerner who was 24. These three men were in Mississippi for Freedom Summer and were working to allow blacks the right to vote. While they were in Mississippi, all three of them went to check out a burned-down church where blacks attended. Police came and “arrested them for trumped-up charges and were imprisoned for hours.”
  • The murder of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman & Michael Schwerner

    The murder of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman & Michael Schwerner
    After several hours, they were released, but into the hands of very evil people, the Ku Klux Klan. The KKK murdered them and it was later proven that “the members of Neshoba County’s law enforcement worked with the KKK and planned to kill these three men.” The men who murdered these civil rights workers were all charged with manslaughter and three sentences of murder. The “ringleader,” Edgar Ray Killen, was given the maximum sentence, 60 years of imprisonment.
  • The murder of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman & Michael Schwerner

    The murder of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman & Michael Schwerner
  • Voting Rights Act of 1965 passed

    Voting Rights Act of 1965 passed
    The Voting Rights Act of 1965 outlawed discriminatory voting practices that had previously been used to not allow blacks to vote. The Act was signed by President Johnson. No state could put in ANY kind of way to discriminate blacks and the ability for them to vote. Every person in the state now was allowed to vote with no limitations! Once this act was passed, many new doors were opened for our country.Information(INFORMATION)
  • Voting Rights Act of 1965 passed

    Voting Rights Act of 1965 passed
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  • Selma to Montgomery March

    Selma to Montgomery March
    The Selma to Montgomery March took place in March of 1965. “This was a 5-day, 54-mile march that began in Selma, Alabama and finished in Montgomery, Alabama.” The SNCC, SCLC and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. were all trying to pressure the government to give all blacks voting rights because only 2% were on the voting polls. These marches happened three times in January, February and in March. In February, police officers attacked some of these non-violent protestors.
  • Selma to Montgomery March

    Selma to Montgomery March
    However, these protesters didn’t give up and it paid off. In August of 1965, President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. [Information](mlkkpp01.stanford.edu/index.../enc_selma_to_montgomery_march/)( INFORMATION) Picture(PICTURE)
  • Summerhill Race Riot (Atlanta)

    Summerhill Race Riot (Atlanta)
    The Summerhill Race Riot was a four-day riot that occurred in Atlanta, GA. The riot occurred because a policeman shot a black man. An organization formed over the incident and they were called Summerhill Neighbrohood, Inc. Summerhill was having a little bump in the road. The town was having economic and political trouble which caused some crime. www.summerhillatl.org/summerhill-history(INFORMATION)
  • Summerhill Race Riot (Atlanta)

    Summerhill Race Riot (Atlanta)
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  • MLK assasscinated

    MLK assasscinated
    The assassination of America’s most famous nonviolent protestor took place on April 4, 1968. King was shot in Memphis, TN on his hotel balcony. James Earl Ray murdered King. Ray was arrested and charged with crime. Atlanta built many buildings in King’s honor and Atlanta citizens were deeply saddened by the news of King’s death. Martin was from Atlanta and many respected him. [Information](en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_King,_Jr.)(INFORMATION)
  • MLK assassinated

    MLK assassinated
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  • All GA Schools Integrated

    All GA Schools Integrated
    The process of integrating schools was declared unconstitutional. Georgia’s school integration was much more peaceful than many other states. They had smoother transitions without many incidents. Many schools struggled with the thought of integrating schools. Some parents even went to the extreme of removing their child from a public school and paying tuition so they could be with other white kids. After all of Georgia’s schools were integrated, a huge milestone had finally occurred.
  • all GA schools Integrated

    all GA schools Integrated
    Blacks and whites could finally be treated equally.
    Picture(PICTURE) [Information](www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-2716 -)
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