Canadian Identity Timeline

Timeline created by nancy121212
In History
  • Acadians Exiled from their Homes

    Acadians Exiled from their Homes
    The Maritime inhabitants, Acadians, were loyal to France, but when sovereignty passed on to Britain, the British authorities wanted the Acadians to swear neutrality in any conflict between Britain and France. Eventually the British met with the Acadians and pressed them to sign an oath of allegiance to Britain, but they refused and so they were imprisoned and deported. This is important because some returned and worked hard to create a community in which they promote the French language.
  • The Conquest (Battle on the Plains of Abraham)

    The Conquest (Battle on the Plains of Abraham)
    The Battle of the Plains of Abraham was a pivotal moment in the history of Canada during the Seven Years' War. The British led an invasion and defeated French troops, which led to the surrender of Quebec to the British. At the end of the war, France surrendered most of its colonial possessions over to the British. This is a significant event in Canadian history because it marked the time when Quebec became a part of Canada, and it led to a new Canadian identity that included the French.
  • The Royal Proclamation and First Nations

    The Royal Proclamation and First Nations
    The Royal Proclamation sets out guidelines for European settlers in North America, on what was Aboriginal territories. It was initially issued to claim British territory after they won the Seven Years' War, and the ownership of North America was issued to King George. But, it also states that all land would be considered Aboriginal land until ceded by treaty. This plays a role in Canadian identity, because it shows that this was once Aboriginal territories and we need to respect that and them.
  • Lord Durham's Report Encouraging Assimilation

    Lord Durham's Report Encouraging Assimilation
    Lord Durham's Report recommended the union of upper and lower Canada into a single colony, and that responsible government be granted. But Lord Durham also wanted the French Canadians to be assimilated, and he had hoped that by combining the different provinces of Canada this would happen. He wanted this so that "racism" wasn't a problem. This changed the Canadian identity and really affected French Canadians badly. But now we are learning to create a Canadian identity that accepts everyone.
  • Aboriginal Canadians - Manitoba Act Passed, Creation of Manitoba

    Aboriginal Canadians - Manitoba Act Passed, Creation of Manitoba
    The Manitoba Act was passed in 1870, resulting in the creation of the province of Manitoba, which marked the resolution of the struggle for self-determination between the Red River Colony and the federal government. By passing the Manitoba Act and allowing the province of Manitoba to be created, the federal government was showing respect for the colony and again recognizing the diversity and creating a new Canadian identity that accepts diversity.
  • The Indian Act

    The Indian Act
    The Indian Act is federal law that governs over matters such as Indian status, bands, and reserves. Its initial purpose was to control the Indians and to assimilate them into Canada. But over time they have altered it many times and improved it to remove and parts of it that were discriminant towards the Indians. This has changed Canadian identity in the way that we have many different nations within out nation and we now except those differences.
  • Chinese Head Tax

    Chinese Head Tax
    The Chinese Head Tax, under the Chinese Immigration Act, was when Chinese immigrants had to pay $50 to enter Canada, later they raised it to $100 and then $500. After the removed this tax, they banned Chinese immigration until 1947. This is important because it shows how Canada used to discriminate against Chinese immigrants, but now they are learning to accept them.
  • Manitoba Schools Question and Issue in the Federal Election

    Manitoba Schools Question and Issue in the Federal Election
    The Manitoba Schools Question was a crisis in 1896 that involved publicly funded schools for Roman Catholics and Protestants. Due to the close relationship between language and religion at the time, the question raised was whether French would survive in Western Canada. This crisis was important because it brought up the topic of the importance to preserve the many different cultures in Canada.
  • Conscription During WWI

    Conscription During WWI
    The Conscription Crisis began when the British government passed a law that said that single men aged 18-40, were liable to be called to serve in the military (with some exceptions). This created conflict between French and English Canadians along with other minorities, because the French didn't want to fight in the war and it went against some religions. This was an important time in Canadian history because minorities spoke out, and showed the diversity in the Canadian identity and culture.
  • Canada - Adopts the Maple Leaf Flag

    Canada - Adopts the Maple Leaf Flag
    When Canada became independent of Britain, they went on a search for a new flag. It was supposed to be red and white, according to the King of Britain at the time, and this was to symbolize hope, prosperity, peace, tranquility, and neutrality. And the maple leaf stands for the cultural heritage and national resources of Canada. This was an important time in Canadian history because they came to a conclusion on a flag that would represent the independent nation of Canada as a prosperous country.
  • The White Paper on Aboriginal Rights

    The White Paper on Aboriginal Rights
    The White Paper was a policy paper proposal made in 1969 by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. The purpose was to abolish all legal documents, such as the Indian Act, and all treaties within Canada, to take away Indian status, and reserve status. The Aboriginal people would be viewed as equal Canadian citizens both in society and in the provincial government. This proposal is important because it shows that Canada is very diverse but we still see every human being as equal, no matter your title.
  • Francophone Canadians - Canada Officially Becomes Bilingual

    Francophone Canadians - Canada Officially Becomes Bilingual
    In 1969, Canada's government decided to make Canada bilingual. This made both English and French the official language of Canada, which made both French and English Canadians happy. This was important because Canada is made up of so many different cultures, and this shows that they recognize the diversity and don't think that it was right to have only one official language.
  • Canada Adopts Multiculturalism

    Canada Adopts Multiculturalism
    Canada adopted official multiculturalism in 1971 while Pierre Trudeau was the prime minister. The government of Canada said that they would recognize and respect the diversity within Canada. This is a very important time in the history of Canada and Canadian identity because it shows that Canadian identity is not made up of sameness, but of the diversity and multiple different cultures that makes up Canada's population.
  • Bill 101 Passed in Quebec

    Bill 101 Passed in Quebec
    Bill 101, also known as the Charter of the French Language, was passed in 1977, the objection of this law was to make French the official language of Quebec, both in the government and everyday use. This brought up conflict because of the english speaking Canadians that have become a minority in Quebec, this law makes life harder for them. But, this was an important event in Canadian history, because it again shows the diversity in Canada, but also how well people recognize and respect it.
  • The NEP is implemented

    The NEP is implemented
    The National Energy Program was a policy created by the government in 1980, with a goal of independence from the world oil market, and for all Canadians to participate in the energy industry and that they could all benefit from its expansion. This policy created a sense of nationalism because the whole country would be working towards the same goal and they would all benefit from it. So this is important because it also created a sense of national unity and a sense of pride for the nation.
  • Quebec Refuses to Sign the Constitution

    Quebec Refuses to Sign the Constitution
    Quebec refused to sign the constitution in 1982 because of two main reasons. With new changes, Quebec would not be able to refuse consent for future constitutional change, and because of a clause in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms that would result in the ending of Bill 101. This is a significant time in history because it once again showed that Canada has many different nations in its own nation and many different cultures, that Quebec is trying desperately to protect.
  • Aboriginal Canadians - The Assembly of First Nations is Established

    Aboriginal Canadians - The Assembly of First Nations is Established
    The Assembly of First Nations was established in 1982, and the purpose of the assembly is to get together at least twice a year to discuss issues on behalf of First Nations such as treaties, Indigenous rights, land, and resources. The assembly represents around 900,000 First Nations. This is very important, because it shows that Canada recognizes diversity and works towards making every culture and minority comfortable and happy.
  • Canada - Western Canada Given A Voice

    Canada - Western Canada Given A Voice
    In 1987, the Reform Party was created to give western Canada a voice in Ottawa. The reason they created it was because of western Canada's discontent in the federal government, so by the creation of the Reform Party they would now also have a voice in Ottawa. This event shows the beginning of involvement of all provinces in Canada in government and this shows a sense of nationalism.
  • Supreme Court Allows Turban with RCMP Uniform

    Supreme Court Allows Turban with RCMP Uniform
    This event is very important in Canada's history. It was when the supreme court officially allowed muslims to wear turbans while they wore there RCMP uniform. Before this, they were denied the right to wear any religious head covering with the RCMP uniform, so this showed that Canada was beginning to see the importance of including the different religions and cultures in everyday living.
  • The Oka Crisis

    The Oka Crisis
    The Oka Crisis was a dispute between a group of Mohawk people and town of Oka over land. It began because the town of Oka was planning to expand their golf course onto land that was traditionally used by the Mohawk, and so they felt a connection to the land. It ended in the town of Oka buying other land to give the Mohawk other land to expand their cemetary. This is important because it clearly shows that there will always be conflict between the nations in Canada, but we need to be fair.
  • Referendum on Separation of Quebec from Canada

    Referendum on Separation of Quebec from Canada
    This was the second referendum on separation of Quebec from Canada, and over 93% of Quebec's population voted. The result was almost 50/50, but there were slightly more no's, and so Quebec did not separate from Canada. Through this referendum, it showed that even many people in Quebec feel a sense of loyalty and nationalism towards Canada, and that they weren't ready to be seperated from Canada yet.
  • Francophone Canadians - Quebec a Nation Within A Nation-State

    Francophone Canadians - Quebec a Nation Within A Nation-State
    In 2006, Prime Minister Stephen Harper called Quebec a nation within a nation-state. This was because Quebec has a whole nother culture than the rest of Canada, and they have really struggled with fitting in the to Canada. But, by Stephen Harper saying this, he let Quebec know that they were accepted as a whole different nation, but they were still welcome in Canada, and that Canada accepts the diversity.
  • Canada Apologizes for Residential Schools

    Canada Apologizes for Residential Schools
    In 2008, Prime Minister Stephen Harper publicly apologized for residential schools and the attempt of assimilating Aboriginal people, and admitting that the residential schools were very cruel and wrong. This public apology showed how sorry the Canadian government is for the mistakes made in history and the promise to do better and to accept them as part of the Canadian population.