Map canada

Canada - 1100 years of history

  • Jan 1, 900

    Aboriginal Peoples

    Aboriginal Peoples
    30,000–10,000 BC Prehistoric hunters cross over into Canada from Asia.
  • Jan 1, 1000

    The vikings arrived

    The vikings arrived
    the Vikings, were also among of the greatest seafarers in the annuals of history. They fearlessly sailed the waters of the North Atlantic in open longboats in some of the worse weather, most dangerous conditions, and coldest water the world can offer.
  • Jan 1, 1451

    The Irroquois confederacy

    The Irroquois confederacy
    The Iroquois Confederacy is formed by a leader dekanawidah, the peacemaker.
  • Jun 24, 1497

    John Cabot

    John Cabot
    In 1497, John Cabot (Giovanni Cabotto) set off on a voyage to Asia. On his way he, like Christopher Columbus, ran into an island off the coast of North America. As a result, Cabot became the second European to discover North America and reaches to Newfoundland.
  • Jul 11, 1534

    Jacques Cartier first explores

    Jacques Cartier first explores
    Jacques carteir "French Explorer" he was to "discover certain islands and lands where it is said that a great quantity of gold and other precious things are to be found". It took him twenty days to sail across the ocean. Starting on May 10 of that year, he explored parts of Newfoundland, the areas now the Canadian Atlantic provinces and the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the great lakes.
  • Samuel de Champlain

    Samuel de Champlain
    Samuel de Champlain establishes a French colony at Québec City. Champlain settled along Québec’s shoreline, a natural harbor where Place Royale is situated today. the port royal became Quebec city.
  • Hudson Bay Company

    Hudson Bay Company
    King Charles II of England signs the charter incorporating the Hudson’s Bay trading company. Frenchmen named Radisson and des Groseilliers discovered a wealth of fur in the interior of the continent – north and west of the Great Lakes – accessible via the great inland sea that is Hudson Bay.King Charles II granted the lands of the Hudson Bay watershed to “the Governor and Company of Adventurers of England trading into Hudson Bay.”
  • Expulsion of the Acadians

    Expulsion of the Acadians
    Pressure from the English was strong. British Governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council decided on July 28, 1755 to deport the Acadians. About 6,000 Acadians were forcibly removed from their colonies. The British military ordered the Acadians' communities to be destroyed and homes and barns were burned down. the most well known symbol of the expulsion.
  • Battle of the Plains of Abraham:

    Battle of the Plains of Abraham:
    The Battle of the Plains of Abraham (13 September 1759) was a pivotal moment in the Seven Years’ War and in the history of Canada. A British invasion force led by General James Wolfe defeated French troops under the Marquis de Montcalm, leading to the surrender of Québec to the British.
  • The Treaty of Paris (Pontiac war)

    The Treaty of Paris (Pontiac war)
    The Treaty of Paris ends the Seven Years’ War, The war began in May 1763 when Native Americans, offended by the policies of British General Jeffrey Amherst, attacked a number of British forts and settlements. Eight forts were destroyed, and hundreds of colonists were killed or captured, with many more fleeing the region. Britain taking possession of Canada. New France is formally ceded to Britain; Pontiac Rebellion erupts.
  • James Cooke explore the west coast (B.C)

    James Cooke explore the west coast (B.C)
    Captain James Cook explores the Pacific Coast from Nootka, Vancouver Island, to the Bering Strait.
  • First Loyalists land at Saint John, N.B.

    First Loyalists land at Saint John, N.B.
    the numbers of refugess with the arrival of about 15,000 Loyalists. They begin arriving after the American Revolution. Most of them landed at the mouth of the St. John River, engulfing the over 400 civilians and troops living there, and founding the city of Saint John.
  • The BNA establishes upper and lower Canada

    The BNA establishes upper and lower Canada
    Quebec is divided into two colonies, Upper and Lower Canada, each with its own Assembly.
  • War of 1812: U.S. invades Canada

    War of 1812: U.S. invades Canada
    The War of 1812: U.S. invades Canada. The War of 1812 was a military conflict, lasting for two-and-a-half years, between the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, its North American colonies and its American Indian allies. Seen by the United States and Canada as a war in its own right.
  • North West trading company

    North West trading company
    The two sides fought each other from the 1780s until 1821. Both companies were spending all their money and energy competing with each other. The war was ruining both companies, but the North West Company weakened the most - especially after the Battle of Seven Oaks. In 1821, the two companies merged. Hudson's Bay Company was now able to run the fur trade with no competition. This was the beginning of profitable times.
  • Rebellions of 1837-38- Upper and Lower Canada

    Rebellions of 1837-38- Upper and Lower Canada
    The Rebellions of 1837 were two armed uprisings that took place in Lower and Upper Canada in 1837 and 1838. Both rebellions were motivated by frustrations with political reform. A key shared goal was responsible government, which was eventually achieved in the incidents' aftermath. The rebellions led directly to Lord Durham's Report on the Affairs of British North America and to The British North America Act, 1840 which partially reformed the British provinces into a unitary system and eventua
  • Responsible Government was granted

    Responsible Government was granted
    The so-called Great Ministry of Robert Baldwin and Louis-H. Lafontaine outlines the principles of responsible government in the Canadas. The Maritimes are brought into the plan by Howe, then a reform-minded member of the House of Assembly.
  • Confederation Meeting

    Confederation Meeting
    Quebec Conference opens to continue confederation talks. ( It will settle the fundamentals upon which the British North American Act will be based.)
  • The Dominion of Canada: Quebec, Ontario, Nova Scotia

     The Dominion of Canada: Quebec, Ontario, Nova Scotia
    Province and territories joined Confederation, or were created from existing parts of Canada: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Quebec comes into existence, with John A. Macdonald as first prime minister.
  • Red River Rebellion: Red River Resistance

    Red River Rebellion: Red River Resistance
    The 1869–70 uprising in the Red River Colony was sparked by the transfer of the vast territory of Rupert's Land to the new nation of Canada. The colony of farmers and hunters, many of them Métis, occupied a corner of Rupert's Land and feared for their culture and land rights under Canadian control.
  • Manitoba joined Canada

    Manitoba joined Canada
    Province and territories joined Confederation, or were created from existing parts of Canada: Prince Edward Island
  • B.C. join Canada

    B.C. join Canada
    hen British Columbia joined Confederation it was so remote from the rest of Canada that mail going east had to carry an American stamp and go through San Francisco.
  • North West mounted police

    North West mounted police
    The North-West Mounted Police (NWMP) was a Canadian police force. It was established in 1873, and in 1904 the name was changed to Royal Northwest Mounted Police, it merged with the Dominion Police to become the current Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
  • P.E.I joined Canada

    P.E.I joined Canada
    By 1873 conditions in Prince Edward Island were becoming desperate. The railway had proven to be a financial disaster, the landowner issue had not progressed and communication with the mainland was sporadic. The time seemed opportune for the re-opening of negotiations with Canada about entry into Confederation. The British authorities had started to apply pressure to PEI to join Canada in order to solidify the new Empire country as a counterbalance to the US and the Canadian government had propo
  • The First Organized Ice Hockey Game

    The First Organized Ice Hockey Game
    Hockey is Canada's official national winter sport and perhaps its greatest contribution to world sport. Canada is considered the birthplace of ice hockey, and Canadians generally regard the sport as their own.The first organized hockey game took place in Montreal between a group of McGill Unviersity students. The rules for this game were the same as those of field hockey. Two teams of nine men played for sixty minutes, trying to get a small, wooden puck between the opposing teams goal posts.
  • The Canadian pacific railway was completed

    The Canadian pacific railway was completed
    The last spike of the Canadian Pacific Railway main line is driven at Craigellachie, BC. The next year, Vancouver is founded as the railway's western terminus.
  • North-West Rebellion

    North-West Rebellion
    The North-West Rebellion (or North-West Resistance) was a violent, five-month insurgency against the Canadian government, fought mainly by Métis militants and their Aboriginal allies in what is now Saskatchewan and Alberta.
  • The Clonedike Gold Rush

    The Clonedike Gold Rush
    Gold is discover in the Klondike. By the next year, 100 000 people are rushing to the Yukon in hope of getting rich.The Klondike Gold Rush is fully under way. The Yukon provisional district is identified as a Territory separate from the Northwest Territories.
  • the Boer war (British against Africa)

    the Boer war (British against Africa)
    The Boer War in South Africa stars, fought between Dutch Afrikaners (Boers) and the British. Seven thousand Canadian volunteers fight on the British side.
  • Alberta and Saskatchewan

    Alberta and Saskatchewan
    This is a map of Canada showing the provinces as they were at the time Alberta and Saskatchewan joined Confederation in 1905.
  • World War I 1914–18

    World War I  1914–18
    The First World War of 1914–1918 was the bloodiest conflict in Canadian history, taking the lives of more than 60,000 Canadians. he war also deepened the divide between French and English Canada, and marked the beginning of widespread state intervention in society and the economy.
  • Women win the vote in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta

    Women win the vote in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
    Women in Canada obtained the right to vote in a sporadic fashion. Federal authorities granted them the franchise in 1918, more than two years after the women of Manitoba became the first to vote at the provincial level.
  • The Winnipeg General Strike

    The Winnipeg General Strike
    The Winnipeg General Strike, 15 May-25 June 1919, is Canada's best-known general strike. Massive unemployment and inflation, the success of the Russian Revolution in 1917, and rising Revolutionary Industrial Unionism all contributed to the postwar labour unrest that fuelled the landmark strike.
  • The Great Depression (1929–39): The Dirty Thirties

    The Great Depression (1929–39):  The Dirty Thirties
    The worldwide Great Depression of the early 1930s was a social and economic shock that left millions of Canadians unemployed, hungry and often homeless. Few countries were affected as severely as Canada during what became known as the Dirty Thirties, due to Canada’s heavy dependence on raw material and farm exports, combined with a crippling Prairies drought.
  • World War II (1939–45)

    World War II (1939–45)
    The Second World War was one of the most significant events in Canadian history. Canada played a vital role in the Battle of the Atlantic and the air war over Germany, and contributed forces to the campaigns of western Europe beyond what might be expected of a small nation of then only 11 million people.
  • Newfoundland joins Canada

    Newfoundland joins Canada
    When the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa were reconstructed after a fire during the First World War, stone plaques were erected over the entrance to the Peace Tower.
  • The Korean War

    The Korean War
    The Korean War starts. Twenty-seven thousand Canadians serve and more than 1 600 are killed or wounded.
  • The saint Lawrence Sea way opened

    The saint Lawrence Sea way opened
    The St. Lawrence Seaway opened to navigation in 1959. Construction of the 189-mile (306-kilometer) stretch of the Seaway between Montreal and Lake Ontario is recognized as one of the most challenging engineering feats in history. Seven locks were built in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the Seaway, five Canadian and two U.S., in order to lift vessels to 246 feet (75 meters) above sea level.
  • First Nation people allow voting

    First Nation people allow voting
    Native people living on reserves get the right to vote in federal elections. A dedication to fairness and equality was a driving force of John Diefenbaker’s career. Diefenbaker felt that all citizens were entitled to certain essential rights, despite cultural differences. Throughout his political career he attempted to correct certain aspects of Canada’s past injustices, and his government took steps to create harmony between the Federal Government and First Nations people
  • the quiet revolution in Quebec

    the quiet revolution in Quebec
    Liberals under Jean Lesage win provincial election in Québec, inaugurating the Quiet Revolution which pressed for special status within Confederation. (talking about separation)
  • The Centennial anniversary (100th year anniversary)

    The Centennial anniversary (100th year anniversary)
    The Canadian Centennial was a yearlong celebration held in 1967 when Canada celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Confederation. Celebrations occurred throughout the year but culminated on Dominion Day, July 1. 1967 coins were different from previous (or forthcoming) years' issues, with animals on each — the cent, for instance, had a dove on its reverse. Communities and organizations across Canada were encouraged to engage in Centennial projects to celebrate the anniversary.
  • October crisis (political kidnapping)

    October crisis (political kidnapping)
    The October Crisis. After the FLQ kidnaps a Quebec government minister and a British trade commissioner, Prime Minister Trudeau invokes the War Measures Act, which allows Canadians to be arrested and held without being charged
  • Referendum of Quebec to become sovereign country

    Referendum of Quebec to become sovereign country
    Quebec voters reject "sovereignty-association" in favor of renewed Confederation. (60% NO, 40% YES)
  • The constitution is created (the Charter of Rights and Freedom)

    The constitution is created (the Charter of Rights and Freedom)
    Canada gets a new Constitution Act, including a Charter of Rights and Freedoms which guarantees the rights and freedoms set out in it subject only to such reasonable limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.
  • The Winter Olympics open in Calgary.

    The Winter Olympics open in Calgary.
    The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games (French: Les XVes Jeux olympiques d'hiver), was a Winter Olympics multi-sport event celebrated in and around Calgary, Alberta, Canada between February 13 and 28, 1988. The Calgary Winter Olympics. Canada wins two silver medals (Brian Orser and Elizabeth Manley, for figure skating) and three bronze medals.
  • The North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

    The North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)
    Canada, Mexico and the U.S. sign the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Under the treaty, certain goods traded between the countries are tax-free.
  • RADARSAT

    RADARSAT
    RADARSAT is launched as the first Canadian earth observation satellite and first non-communications satellite since 1971. It can provide images of the earth's surface day and night, in any climate conditions, to clients around the world.
  • Nunavut was created (North West territory was divided)

    Nunavut was created (North West territory was divided)
    Nunavut separated from the Northwest Territories to become the newest Canadian territory. The creation of Nunavut was the outcome of the largest aboriginal land claims agreement between the Canadian government and the native Inuit people.
  • An International Anti-terrorism Mission

    An International Anti-terrorism Mission
    Prime Minister Jean Chretien announces Canada’s participation in an international anti-terrorism mission in Afghanistan
  • Canada’s contribution to the war on terrorism

    Canada’s contribution to the war on terrorism
    Four soldiers, part of Canada’s contribution to the war on terrorism after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States, are killed when a U.S. fighter jet mistakenly bombs them in Afghanistan. They are the first soldiers killed in a combat zone since the Korean War.
  • Census Of Population

    Census Of Population
    Census data collected the year before puts Canada’s population at 31,612,897.
  • 100th military

    100th military
    Canada marks the 100th military death as a result of its ongoing mission in Afghanistan.
  • The Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver

    The Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver
    The Winter Olympic Games begin in Vancouver. Freestyle moguls skier Alexandre Bilodeau becomes the first-ever athlete to claim a gold medal on Canadian soil. Canada goes on to win 14 gold medals – an all-time high for a host country in a Winter Olympics.
  • NATO

    NATO
    The Canadian flag is lowered at the NATO headquarters in Kabul, marking the formal end to Canada’s operations in Afghanistan.