Baroque

Timeline created by Omarchaparro
In Music
  • Period:
    1551
    to

    Giulio Gaccini

    4 stage works, more than 75 songs or arias, one of the founders of opera, gave a new singing style in his book of songs of 1602, Italian composer, Le nuove muisiche
  • Period:
    1557
    to

    Giovanni Gabrieli

    90 motets, grand concertos, Italian composer and organist, nephew of Andrea, and is noted for his use of instruments in his sacred music
  • Period:
    1561
    to

    Jacopo Peri

    20 stage works, 30 songs, one of the founders of Opera (claimed to be the first in 1597), contributed to monody and recitative styles.
  • Period:
    1563
    to

    John Dowland

    3 books of songs, many pieces for Lute, English (maybe Irish?), the leading composer of lute music, appointed as the King's Lutist in London
  • Period:
    1564
    to

    William Shakespeare

    English playwriter and poet, an important force in music
  • Period:
    1567
    to

    Claudio Monteverdi

    Most important composer of the early Baroque, one of the inventors of the new second practice-or modern style, not all of the works survived.
  • Period:
    1570
    to

    Florentine Camerata

    A group of intellectuals that met to discuss the arts: included Caccini, Peri, Girolamo Mei, Vincenzo Galilei (Began in the 1570s)
  • Period: to

    Orlando Gibbons

    English, Composer of Anglican Church anthems, leading composer in the 17th century, sacred choral music
  • Period: to

    Girolamo Frescobaldi

    First modern keyboard virtuoso and composer; highly influenced keyboard in Baroque, first European composer to focus on instrumental music.
  • Period: to

    Heinrich Schutz

    Most important German composer of Middle Baroque, composed the first German opera (which is lost). Wrote Madrigal and hundreds of choral works
  • Period: to

    Giacomo Carissimi

    A leading composer of Roman cantatas and oratorios, teacher of Charpentier,150+ cantatas
  • Period: to

    Barbara Strozzi

    Virtuoso singer and prolific composer of cantatas in the 17th century, adopted daughter of a Poet (Guilio Strozzi)
  • Period: to

    Giovanni Legrenzi

    Italian composer and organist, singer, author, historian and architect, he wrote the first history of music in Italian (Historia musica,1695) wrote 4 operas
  • Period: to

    Jean-Baptiste Lully

    Establisher of French opera and Ballet, dancer and violinist, Italian by birth but claimed by France
  • Period: to

    Dieterich Buxtehude

    German organist and composer, important organ composer BEFORE J.S Bach, respected Bach
  • Period: to

    Marc-Antoine Charpentier

    Composer of French opera; pupil of Carissimi; equal to Lully and extremely prolific. 11 masses, Magnificats, motets, psalms, etc...
  • Period: to

    John Blow

    English composer of Odes; Tacher of Purcell (an organist) over a 100 songs (duets and trios), instrumental anthems
  • Period: to

    Johann Pachelbel

    German composer and organist; a leading composer of his time.
    Wrote: liturgical organ music, protestant church music
  • Period: to

    Giuseppe Torelli

    Contributed the most to the development of the concerto around the 1700s. wrote for trumpet and strings; virtuoso violinist
  • Period: to

    Henry Purcell

    Most important English composer in the 17th century.
    wrote: 6 stage works, keyboard music, anthems
  • Period: to

    Francois Couperin

    French composer, Keyboardist, one of the important french composers, wrote: 27 ordres (sets) of keyboard works
  • Period: to

    Antonio Vivaldi

    Italian composer; he kaid the foundations for late Baroque instrumental music; teacher, pioneer of orchestral music but virtually forgotten by his contemporaries at his death. wrote: 425 concerti grossi, 350 solo concerti, 45 operas
  • Period: to

    Georg Philipp Telemann

    The most prolific German composer of his day, more popular than J.S Bach during the Baroque; contributed significantly to concert life in Germany.
    Wrote: Cantatas, motets, operas, quartets, and quintets theoretical publications
  • Period: to

    Domenico Scarlatti

    Son of Alessandro, Keyboard composer and virtuoso, served Portuguese and Spanish royal families; progressive style and personally aware of it.
  • Period: to

    Johann Sebastian Bach

    The Baroque Master; wrote no operas; master of counterpoint; he became an icon for future generations and is still one of the most revered composers today.
  • Period: to

    Johann Joachim Quantz

    German Composer; Flutist and flute teacher for Fredrick the Great in Berlin. Wrote: 204 sonatas, 300+ concertos, published treatise "playing the flute", 1752
  • Period: to

    Giovanni Battista Pergolesi

    Galant Neapolitan composer, he died young and his achievements were romanticized after his death; his intermezzo, "La serva padrona" sparked the war of the bouffons in Paris in 1752.