Andrew Jackson

  • Andrew Jackson was born

    Andrew Jackson was born
  • Andrew Jackson enlists in the army

    Andrew Jackson enlists in the army
    Andrew Jackson enlisted into the Continental Army at age twelve and served as a courier in the Revolutionary War, running important packages and battle orders across the front. While he performed his job admirably, he was eventually captured and taken prisoner by the Brits, making him the only U.S. President in history to ever have been a Prisoner of War.
  • Battle of Horseshoe Bend

    Battle of Horseshoe Bend
    The Battle of Horseshoe Bend, was fought during the War of 1812 in central Alabama. On March 27, 1814, United States forces and Indian allies under Major General Andrew Jackson defeated the Red Sticks, a part of the Creek Indian tribe who opposed American expansion, effectively ending the Creek War.
  • Battle of New Orleans

    Battle of New Orleans
    The Battle of New Orleans was the last major battle of the War of 1812. The fight took place on January 8, 1815 when 7,500 British soldiers marched against 4,500 U.S. troops led by General Andrew Jackson. Jackson defeated the British just 30 minutes, halting their plans to attack New Orleans and establishing himself as a national military hero. The Treaty of Ghent, which ended the war, had been signed two weeks before the battle but the news had not yet crossed the Atlantic.
  • Election of 1824

    Election of 1824
    In the November 1824 election, 131 electoral votes, just over half of the 261 total, were necessary to elect a candidate president. Although it had no bearing on the outcome of the election, popular votes were counted for the first time in this election. On December 1, 1824, the results were announced. Andrew Jackson of Tennessee won 99 electoral and 153,544 popular votes; John Quincy Adams--the son of John Adams, the second president of the United States--received 84 electoral and 108,740 popul
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    Election of 1824

    In the November 1824 election, 131 electoral votes, just over half of the 261 total, were necessary to elect a candidate president. Although it had no bearing on the outcome of the election, popular votes were counted for the first time in this election. On December 1, 1824, the results were announced. Andrew Jackson of Tennessee won 99 electoral and 153,544 popular votes; John Quincy Adams--the son of John Adams, the second president of the United States--received 84 electoral and 108,740 popul
  • Election of 1828

    Election of 1828
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    Election of 1828

    Andrew Jackson won the presidency in 1828 by a landslide, receiving a record 647,292 popular votes (56 percent) to 507,730 (44 percent) for the incumbent John Quincy Adams. John C. Calhoun won the vice presidency with 171 electoral votes to 83 for Richard Rush and 7 for William Smith.
  • Nullification Crisis

    Nullification Crisis
    People feared that Jackson, their supposed champion, lacked sufficient vigilance in protecting their interests—fears that provoked the nullification crisis in 1832-1833 and Jackson's crushing of extremist threats to federal authority. A broader southern opposition emerged in the late 1830s, mainly among wealthy planters alienated by the disastrous panic of 1837 and suspicious of Jackson's successor, the Yankee Martin Van Buren. In the rest of the country, meanwhile, the Jacksonian leadership'
  • Indian Removal Act

    Indian Removal Act
    In 1830, Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which gave the federal government the power to exchange Native-held land in the cotton kingdom east of the Mississippi for land to the west, in the “Indian colonization zone” that the United States had acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase. (This “Indian territory” was located in present-day Oklahoma.)
  • Worchester v. Georgia

    Worchester v. Georgia
    Worcester v. Georgia, 31 U.S. (6 Pet.) 515, was a case in which the United States Supreme Court vacated the conviction of Samuel Worcester and held that the Georgia criminal statute that prohibited non-Indians from being present on Indian lands without a license from the state was unconstitutional.
  • Bank War

    Bank War
    Bank War the struggle between President Andrew Jackson and Nicholas Biddle, president of the Bank of the United States, over the existence of the only national banking institution in the nation during the second quarter of the 19th century. The first Bank of the United States, chartered in 1791 over the objections of Thomas Jefferson, ceased in 1811 when the republicans refused to pass a new federal charter.In 1816 the second Bank of the United States was created, with a 20-year federal charter.
  • Andrew Jackson died

    Andrew Jackson died
    Andrew Jackson died at The Hermitage.