50 important dates in U.S History

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    The Continental Congress approves the Articles of Confederation

    It was approved, after much debate (between July 1776 and November 1777), by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, and sent to the states for ratification. The Articles of Confederation came into force on March 1, 1781, after being ratified by all 13 states.
  • The United States Army is established.

    The Continental Army was created on 14 June 1775 by the Second Continental Congress as a unified army for the colonies to fight Great Britain, with George Washington appointed as its commander.
  • The United States Marine Corps is established

    The United States Marine Corps, also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations with the United States Navy as well as the Army and Air Force.
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    Declaration of Independence

    The United States Declaration of Independence is the pronouncement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia, and it gives the U.S independence from Britain.
  • French join the war against the British

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    In 1778, France became an official ally of the United States through the Treaty of Alliance. At this point, the French became directly involved in the war. The French navy entered the warfighting of the British along the American coast.
  • The Treaty of Paris 1783

    The Treaty of Paris was the official peace treaty between the United States and Britain that ended the American Revolutionary War. It was signed on September 3, 1783. The Congress of the Confederation ratified the treaty on January 14, 1784. King George III ratified the treaty on April 9, 1784.
  • The delegates at the Philadelphia convention approve the Constitution

    The Committee worked on the Constitution until September 17th when the convention voted to approve the Constitution. 41 delegates were present. However, three refused to sign the proposed Constitution: Edmund Randolph (who later supported ratification), Elbridge Gerry, and George Mason.
  • The Bill of Rights is ratified by 3/4ths of the states

    Vermont ratified on November 3, 1791, and Virginia was the final state to ratify on December 15, 1791. Massachusetts, Georgia, and Connecticut ratified in 1939 on the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Bill of Rights by the First Congress.
  • George Washington inaugurated as President of the United States

    The presidency of George Washington began on April 30, 1789, when Washington was inaugurated as the first president of the United States and ended on March 4, 1797. Washington took office after the 1788–89 presidential election, the nation's first quadrennial presidential election, in which he was elected unanimously.
  • Lousinana Purchase

    The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition of the territory of Louisiana by the United States from France in 1803. In return for fifteen million dollars, or approximately eighteen dollars per square mile, the United States nominally acquired a total of 828,000 sq mi.
  • Slave trade ended

    On 25 March 1807, the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act entered the statute books. Nevertheless, although the Act made it illegal to engage in the slave trade throughout the British colonies, trafficking between the Caribbean islands continued, regardless, until 1811.
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    War with England (1812)

    The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States and the United Kingdom, with their respective allies, from June 1812 to February 1815. Historians in Britain often see it as a minor theatre of the Napoleonic Wars; historians in the United States and Canada see it as a war in its own right.
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    Telegraph Invented

    Developed in the 1830s and 1840s by Samuel Morse (1791-1872) and other inventors, the telegraph revolutionized long-distance communication. It worked by transmitting electrical signals over a wire laid between stations
  • Trail of tears

    DescriptionThe Trail of Tears was a series of forced relocations of approximately 60,000 Native Americans in the United States from their ancestral homelands in the Southeastern United States, to areas to the west of the Mississippi River that had been designated as Indian Territory.
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    Texas Revolution

    The Texas Revolution was a rebellion of colonists from the United States and Tejanos in putting up armed resistance to the centralist government of Mexico
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    Battle of the Alamo

    The Battle of the Alamo was a pivotal event in the Texas Revolution. Following a 13-day siege, Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna reclaimed the Alamo Mission near San Antonio de Béxar, killing the Texian and immigrant occupiers.
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    Gold Rush

    The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) was a gold rush that began on January 24, 1848, when gold was found by James W. Marshall at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California. ... While most of the newly arrived were Americans, the gold rush attracted thousands from Latin America, Europe, Australia, and China.
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free."
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    The Civil War

    The American Civil War was a civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865, fought between the northern United States and the southern United States. The civil war began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. Wikipedia
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    Reconstruction

    DescriptionThe Reconstruction era was the period in American history which lasted from 1863 to 1877. It was a significant chapter in the history of American civil rights
  • Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th president of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the nation through the American Civil War, its bloodiest war and its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis.
  • Civil Rights Act of 1875

    The Civil Rights Act of 1875 sometimes called the Enforcement Act or the Force Act, was a United States federal law enacted during the Reconstruction era in response to civil rights violations against African Americans.
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    Spanish American War

    The Spanish–American War was an armed conflict between Spain and the United States in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence.
  • First radio broadcast in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    first commercial radio station was KDKA in Pittsburgh, which went on the air in the evening of Nov. 2, 1920, with a broadcast of the returns of the Harding-Cox presidential election.
  • The United States annexes Guam, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico

    Representatives of Spain and the United States signed a peace treaty in Paris on December 10, 1898, which established the independence of Cuba, ceded Puerto Rico and Guam to the United States, and allowed the victorious power to purchase the Philippines Islands from Spain for $20 million.
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    World War I (WWI)

    World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.
  • The Panama Canal opens for business.

    On August 15, 1914, the Panama Canal opened for business, with the passage through of the Ancon, an American cargo-passenger ship. The Canal was built primarily to make a faster way to the West Coast for American settlers in the 19th Century.
  • The Treaty of Versailles is signed, ending World War I.

    The Treaty of Versailles (French: Traité de Versailles) was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. ... The treaty was registered by the Secretariat of the League of Nations on 21 October 1919.
  • Nineteenth Amendment

    he Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex.
  • Charles Lindbergh

    Charles Augustus Lindbergh was an American aviator, military officer, author, inventor, and activist. At age 25 in 1927, he went from obscurity as a U.S. Air Mail pilot to instantaneous world fame by winning the Orteig Prize for making a nonstop flight from New York to Paris.
  • Black Tuesday

    The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as the Great Crash, was a major stock market crash that occurred in 1929. It started in September and ended late in October when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange collapsed.
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    World War II

    DescriptionWorld War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis.
  • Pearl Harbor

    The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise, preemptive military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service upon the United States against the naval base at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii, just before 08:00, on Sunday morning, December 7, 1941.
  • DDay

    The Normandy landings were the landing operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. Codenamed Operation Neptune and often referred to as D-Day, it was the largest seaborne invasion in history.
  • 1st atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan.

    The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement.
  • Brown v. Board of Education

    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483, was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that U.S. state laws establishing racial segregation in public schools are unconstitutional, even if the segregated schools are otherwise equal in quality.
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    The Cold War began between the United States and the Soviet Union

    The Cold War was a period of geopolitical tension between the Soviet Union with its satellite states and the United States with its allies after World War II. The history of the conflict began between 1946 and 1947. The Cold War began to de-escalate after the Revolutions of 1989.
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    Human rights

    Human rights are moral principles or norms that describe certain standards of human behavior and are regularly protected as natural and legal rights in municipal and international law.
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    Korean War

    The Korean War was a war between North Korea and South Korea. The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea. At the end of World War II, the Soviet Union and the United States liberated Korea from imperial Japanese colonial control on 15 August 1945.
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    Vietnam War

    The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975.
  • Sputnik Satellite

    Sputnik 1 was the first artificial Earth satellite. The Soviet Union launched it into an elliptical low Earth orbit on 4 October 1957, orbiting for three weeks before its batteries died, then silently for two more months before falling back into the atmosphere.
  • NASA formed

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. NASA was established in 1958, succeeding in the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
  • Civil Rights Act of 1960

    The Civil Rights Act of 1960 is a United States federal law that established federal inspection of local voter registration polls and introduced penalties for anyone who obstructed someone's attempt to register to vote.
  • Assassination of John F. Kennedy

    John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy, often referred to by the initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963
  • Apollo 11

    Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin formed the American crew that landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC
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    Baby Boom

    A baby boom is a period marked by a significant increase of birth rate. This demographic phenomenon is usually ascribed within certain geographical bounds.
  • Watergate

    he Watergate scandal was a major federal political scandal in the United States involving the administration of President Richard Nixon from 1972 to 1974 which resulted at the end of Nixon's presidency.
  • Fall Of the Berlin Wall

    The fall of the Berlin Wall (German: Mauerfall), on 9 November 1989, was a pivotal event in world history which marked the falling of the Iron Curtain and the start of the fall of communism in Eastern and Central Europe. The fall of the inner German border took place shortly afterward.
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    Gulf war

    DescriptionThe Gulf War, codenamed Operation Desert Shield for operations leading to the buildup of troops and defense of Saudi Arabia and Operation Desert Storm in its combat phase, was a war waged by coalition
  • September 11th

    The September 11 attacks were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda against the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001.