20th CENTURY TIMELINE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT/THE BUTLER

Timeline created by NaG'ya
In History
  • NAT’L ASSOC. FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE (NAACP)

    NAT’L ASSOC. FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE (NAACP)
    to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.
  • UNIVERSAL NEGRO IMPROVEMENT ASSOC. (UNIA)

    UNIVERSAL NEGRO IMPROVEMENT ASSOC. (UNIA)
    a social, friendly, humanitarian, charitable, educational, institutional, constructive, spiritually governing ruling body, and is founded by persons, desiring to the utmost, to work for the general uplift of the Negro peoples of the world.
  • EXECUTIVE ORDER 8802 (FDR)

    EXECUTIVE ORDER 8802 (FDR)
    Executive Order 8802 was signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 25, 1941, to prohibit ethnic or racial discrimination in the nation's defense industry. ... It was the first federal action, though not a law, to promote equal opportunity and prohibit employment discrimination in the United States.
  • CONGRESS OF RACIAL EQUALITY (CORE)

    CONGRESS OF RACIAL EQUALITY (CORE)
    The Congress of Racial Equality is an African-American civil rights organization in the United States that played a pivotal role for African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement
  • EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 (HST)

    EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 (HST)
    Executive Order 9981, executive order issued on July 26, 1948, by U.S. Pres. Harry S. Truman that abolished racial segregation in the U.S. military. Beginning with the initial skirmishes of the American Revolution, African Americans had played an important role in the armed forces of the United States.
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    GREENSBORO 4

    The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1960, which led to the Woolworth department store chain removing its policy of racial segregation in the Southern United States.
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    BROWN vs. BOE TOPEKA,KA

    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483, was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that U.S. state laws establishing racial segregation in public schools are unconstitutional, even if the segregated schools are otherwise equal in quality.
  • EMMIT TILL

    EMMIT TILL
    Emmett Louis Till was a 14-year-old African American who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955, after being accused of offending a white woman in her family's grocery store
  • SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP COUNCIL/JAMES LAWSON

    SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP COUNCIL/JAMES LAWSON
    James Morris Lawson, Jr. is an American activist and university professor. He was a leading theoretician and tactician of nonviolence within the Civil Rights Movement. During the 1960s, he served as a mentor to the Nashville Student Movement and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.
  • LITTLE ROCK CENTRAL H.S. AR

    LITTLE ROCK CENTRAL H.S. AR
    Little Rock Central High School is an accredited comprehensive public high school in Little Rock, Arkansas, United States. The school was the site of forced desegregation in 1957 after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional three years earlier.
  • KENNEDY-NIXON DEBATES

    KENNEDY-NIXON DEBATES
    In 1960, John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon squared off in the first televised presidential debates in American history. The Kennedy-Nixon debates not only had a major impact on the election’s outcome, but ushered in a new era in which crafting a public image and taking advantage of media exposure became essential ingredients of a successful political campaign. They also heralded the central role television has continued to play in the democratic process.
  • FREEDOM RIDERS ATTACK IN ANNISTON,AL

    FREEDOM RIDERS ATTACK IN ANNISTON,AL
    On May 14, 1961, Freedom Riders were brutally attacked by violent, well-armed and organized mobs of Klansmen and other terrorists in Anniston and Birmingham, Ala. The vicious beatings and a firebombing of the Anniston-bound bus by the Ku Klux Klan had the support of local law enforcement and politicians.
  • BIRMINGHAM CHILDREN'S CRUSADE

    BIRMINGHAM CHILDREN'S CRUSADE
    The Birmingham campaign, or Birmingham movement, was a movement organized in early 1963 by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to bring attention to the integration efforts of African Americans in Birmingham, Alabama
  • I HAVE A DREAM/MLK SPEECH

    I HAVE A DREAM/MLK SPEECH
    "I Have a Dream" is a public speech that was delivered by American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States.
  • ASSASSINATION OF JFK

    ASSASSINATION OF JFK
    John Fitzgerald Kennedy was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his work as president concerned relations with the Soviet Union and Cuba.
  • CHANEY,GOODMAN,& SCHWERNER MURDERS IN MS

    CHANEY,GOODMAN,& SCHWERNER MURDERS IN MS
    The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, involved three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement.
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    SELMA VOTING RIGHTS MARCH

    The Selma to Montgomery marches were three protest marches, held in 1965, along the 54-mile highway from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery.
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    WATTS RIOTS

    The Watts riots, sometimes referred to as the Watts Rebellion, took place in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles from August 11 to 16, 1965. On August 11, 1965, Marquette Frye, an African-American motorist on parole for robbery, was pulled over for reckless driving.
  • BLACK PANTHERS/HUEY NEWTON

    BLACK PANTHERS/HUEY NEWTON
    Huey Percy Newton was a revolutionary African-American political activist who, along with fellow Merritt College student Bobby Seale, co-founded the Black Panther Party in 1966.
  • ASSASSINATION OF MLK

    ASSASSINATION OF MLK
    Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Christian minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.
  • ASSASSINATION OF RFK

    ASSASSINATION OF RFK
    Robert Francis Kennedy was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 64th United States Attorney General from January 1961 to September 1964, and as a U.S. Senator from New York from January 1965 until his assassination in June 1968.
  • SOUTHERN POVERTY LAW CENTER

    SOUTHERN POVERTY LAW CENTER
    The Southern Poverty Law Center is an American nonprofit legal advocacy organization specializing in civil rights and public interest litigation.