Ww1

World War I

  • The Triple Alliance

    The Triple Alliance
  • The Triple Entente

    The Triple Entente
  • About BOTH Alliances Pt.1

    About BOTH  Alliances Pt.1
  • About BOTH Alliances Pt.2

    About BOTH Alliances Pt.2
  • Background of WWI Pt. 1

    Background of WWI Pt. 1
  • Background of WWI Pt. 2

    Background of WWI Pt. 2
  • Background of WWI Pt. 3

    Background of WWI Pt. 3
  • Schlieffen Plan Pt. 1

    Schlieffen Plan Pt. 1
    -In December 1905, the Schlieffen Plan was created by Alfred von Schlieffen (the Germany Army Chief of staff).
    -It was a flawed plan,
    -The plan was for Germany to defeat France quickly through Belgium and Luxembourg and then turn to the eastern front for a major offensive on Russia.
    -Germany thought the France would be easily defeated in 6 weeks, and that Russia would take 6 weeks to mobilize for attack.
  • Schlieffen Plan Pt. 2

    Schlieffen Plan Pt. 2
    -In reality, when the plan was executed on the 2nd August 1914, Germany was defeated by the first Battle of the Marne (while trying to capture Paris) – but failed to succeed the plan, and was forced to withdraw troops to defend eastern border due false assumptions. (Russia only mobilized in 10 days). -The Schlieffen Plan led to Britain declaring war on Germany on August 4th, 1914.
  • War Measures Act

    War Measures Act
    -The War Measures Act was enacted in 191 4 by the Governor in Council. -The act allowed Governor in Council to suspend civil liberties and by-pass parliament to make emergency measures that it felt were necessary for the war. -Ex. Immigrants who had come from what were now enemy countries, like Germany, had their movements controlled and anyone thought to be an enemy sympathizer could be arrested and kept in internment camps without trial.
  • Second Battle of Ypres Pt. 1

    Second Battle of Ypres Pt. 1
    -The Germany invasion on through Belgium brought the British Empire, including Canada into war. -In April 1915, the Canadian 1st Division took up position in the front lines northeast of the Belgian town of Ypres – but this was also the same location Germans had chosen for their next attempt to break the Allied lines. -Germany launched attack on April 22nd, 1915 – began assault by using chlorine gas (first lethal gas used in warfare).
  • Second Battle of Ypres Pt. 2

    Second Battle of Ypres Pt. 2
    -The gas hit the French lines worst, many suffocated and the gas created a gap 8,000 yards long in the Allied lines north of Ypres. -Germans launched a 2nd attack on April 24th,1915 directly at the Canadians -However, Canadians were able to fight off with limited protection using water-soaked cloth as gas mask. (since the gas was water soluble) -On April 29th,1915, after French failed an allied counter attack, Smith-Dorrien was replaced by General Herbert Plumer.
  • Second Battle of Ypres Pt. 3

    Second Battle of Ypres Pt. 3
    -French withdrew on May 1-3, 1915 but fighting renewed May 8th,1915 and then again from May 24-25th,1915. -This attack was beaten off, the Britsh and French stood their ground despite suffering heavy casualties in the initial gas attack. German attacks continued until 25 May, but without achieving any more success.
  • The Battle of the Somme Pt. 1

    The Battle of the Somme Pt. 1
    -The plan of offense to drain the German forces of reserves was planned by Sir Douglas Haig (British Commander in Chief) in the late 1915 (French-British attack) -The British planned to attack at the low ridges near Somme River, France. -The attack itself began at 07:30 on July 1st, 1916 with detonation of mines which surprised the German forces. The surprise attack at first seemed successful, but it wasn’t able to destroy the German forces.
  • The Battle of the Somme Pt. 2

    The Battle of the Somme Pt. 2
    -Although Haig persisted to advance, but German forces secured the front line on July 11th, 1916. -Haig was convinced - as were the Germans - that the enemy was on the point of exhaustion.
  • The Battle of the Somme Pt. 3

    The Battle of the Somme Pt. 3
    -From the end of September – and with a short break in the weather – the Allies managed to take other areas -The battle ended on November 18th, 1916, the human cost for both sides was staggering. -It’s a battle of attrition. (stalemate) -This is one of Haig’s worst fights.
  • The Battle of Vimy Ridge

    The Battle of Vimy Ridge
    -The Battle of Vimy Ridge began at dawn on East Monday, April 9th, 1917 at Vimy Ridge. -It’s the first time all 4 divisions of the Canadian Corps joined the battle with the German forced (commanded by Lieutenant-General Sir Julian Byng) -The troops took months of preparation for the battle, with new tactics and weapons used. (ex. creeping barrage, indirect machine guns) -Battle ended on April 12th, 1917, Canada succeeded in reclaiming the vimy ridge that the British and French failed to.
  • The Battle of Passchendaele Pt. 1

    The Battle of Passchendaele Pt. 1
    -The purpose of the battle was to gain control of the village of Passchendaele (now Passendale) near the town of Ypres in West Flanders (now part of Belgium). The battle started from July 31st, 1917 -The line of strategy was to create vulnerability in the German lines, continue to the Belgian coast and capture the German submarine bases on the coastline. -The initial barrage of Allied artillery warned the Germans -British, Australian and New Zealand forces fought for months with few advances.
  • Battle of Passchendaele Pt. 2

    Battle of Passchendaele Pt. 2
    -The Canadian Corps was ordered to attack the Anzac forces in October 26 -On October 30, the British divisions and the Canadians attack on the Passchendaele itself and it was won by November 6th.
  • Military Voters Act Pt.1

    Military Voters Act Pt.1
  • Military Voters Act Pt.2

    Military Voters Act Pt.2
  • Suffragists Pt. 1

    Suffragists Pt. 1
    -Despite women's contributions to the war, it was still in many ways a 'man's world'. Many women felt it was only fair that they and men were given equal rights, since they were now doing men's jobs. -Several Canadian women organized themselves into suffragist movements, trying to gain for themselves the right to vote.
  • Suffragists Pt. 2

    Suffragists Pt. 2
    -In 1916, women in Manitoba were given the right to vote. Just months later, Saskatchewan and Alberta also were allowed this right and the following year, Ontario and British Columbia also granted suffrage to women. -In the federal election of Sept. 20, 1917, the Wartimes Elections Act was passed, granted the right to vote to mothers, sisters, and wives of soldiers fighting in the war, as well as those who served as nursing sisters.
  • Suffragists Pt. 3

    Suffragists Pt. 3
    -By the end of the war, all women over the age of 21 (except Aboriginals, Asians, and women of other racial minorities) were allowed to vote. -By 1920, with the Dominion Elections Act, women could also run for parliament. -Canadian suffragists during World War I helped Canada take the first steps towards the gender equality that exists today. (women were allowed to vote federally on May 24th 1918)
  • Halixfax Explosion Pt. 1

    Halixfax Explosion Pt. 1
  • Halifax Explosion Pt. 2

    Halifax Explosion Pt. 2
  • Conscription Crisis Pt. 1

    Conscription Crisis Pt. 1
  • Conscription Crisis Pt. 2

    Conscription Crisis Pt. 2
  • Conscription Crisis Pt. 3

    Conscription Crisis Pt. 3
  • Paris Peace Conference Pt. 1

    Paris Peace Conference Pt. 1
  • Paris Peace Conference Pt. 2

    Paris Peace Conference Pt. 2
  • Operation Michael Pt. 1

    Operation Michael Pt. 1
    -On March 14, 1918, General Erich Ludendorff, Chief of Staff of the German armies, was planning a surprise offensive to divide the French and British forces on the Western Front. -The German army launched an offensive on March 21 on a front south of Arras in St Quentin sector. -The Germans wanted to capture the strategically important area of Amiens, to weaken the Allied armies.
  • Operation Michael Pt. 2

    Operation Michael Pt. 2
    -In 5 days, they had recaptured all the land they had lost around the Somme in the previous 2 years. -The plan to diminish the Allied strength was also crucial following to the United States' decision of entering the war in 1917.
  • Armistice

    Armistice
  • Treaty of Versailles Pt. 1

    Treaty of Versailles Pt. 1
  • Treaty of Versailles Pt. 2

    Treaty of Versailles Pt. 2
  • League of Nations Pt. 1

    League of Nations Pt. 1
  • Legue of Nations Pt. 2

    Legue of Nations Pt. 2