Watergate Timeline

Timeline created by aoleniacz
In History
  • Electronic surveillance equipment

    Electronic surveillance equipment
    Electrnic surveillance equipment was installed at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate building. The people who installed the equipment were wiretapping the surveillance equipment trying to steal their information.
  • Five Men arrested for attempting to repair the surveillance equipment

    Five Men arrested for attempting to repair the surveillance equipment
    Five men were arrested on saturday in the attempt to bug the Democratic National Committee headquarters. They were bugging it for President Nixon's reelection committee.
  • President Nixon announces

    President Nixon announces
    John Dean completed his investigation telling President Nixon that the White House was not involved in the scandle. The White House was said to be involved in the scandle but they said they had nothing to do with the Watergate bugging. President Nixon announced that the White House was never involved.
  • Seven men are indicted for their roles in the June break-in

    Seven men are indicted for their roles in the June break-in
    Seven burgurles were arrested for breaking into the Watergate. People started to then believe that Nixon ha something to do with the break in.
  • U.S. Senate creates Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities.

    U.S. Senate creates Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities.
    The Senate Watergate Committee was a special committee convened by the United States Senate to investigate the Watergate burglaries. After it was learned that the Watergate burglars had been directed to break into and wiretap the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee by the Committee to Re-elect the President, President Richard Nixon's re-election campaign fund raising organization.
  • White House staff members H.R. Haldeman, John D. Ehrlichman, and John Dean resign.

    White House staff members H.R. Haldeman, John D. Ehrlichman, and John Dean resign.
    John Daniel Ehrlichman was counsel and Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs under President Richard Nixon. He was a key figure in events leading to the Watergate first break-in and the ensuing Watergate scandal, for which he was convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury. He served a year and a half in prison for his crimes.
  • President Nixon informs Senate Committee that he will not appear to testify nor grant access to Presidential files.

    President Nixon informs Senate Committee that he will not appear to testify nor grant access to Presidential files.
    President Nixon informs the Senate Committee that he will not appear to testify nor grant access to presidential files. Nixon tells the Senate Committee that he will not testify before it and will not grant access to Presidential documents, claiming Executive Privilege.
  • Alexander Butterfield informs Senate Committee of the presence of a White House taping system.

    Alexander Butterfield informs Senate Committee of the presence of a White House taping system.
    The Nixon White House tapes are audio recordings of the communications of U.S. President Richard Nixon and various Nixon administration officials and White House staff, ordered by the President for personal records. The taping system was installed in selected rooms in the White House in February 1971 and was voice activated. The records come from line-taps placed on the telephones and small lavalier microphones in various locations around the rooms.
  • President Nixon refuses to comply with a subpoena for White House tapes and documents to investigate cover-up.

    President Nixon refuses to comply with a subpoena for White House tapes and documents to investigate cover-up.
    The Watergate scandal was a political scandal that occurred in the United States in the 1970s as a result of the June 17, 1972, break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C., and the Nixon administration's attempted cover-up of its involvement. The scandal eventually led to the resignation of Richard Nixon, the President of the United States, on August 9, 1974 — the only resignation of a U.S. President. The scandal also resulted in
  • President Nixon agrees to hand over tapes to comply with subpoena.

    President Nixon agrees to hand over tapes to comply with subpoena.
    The nine tapes gained fame during the Watergate scandal of 1973 and 1974 when the system was made public during the televised testimony of White House aide Alexander Butterfield; the tapes became the focus of considerable interest. Only a few White House employees had ever been aware that this system existed.
  • Senate Committee announces discovery of 18 ½ minute gap on tape of Nixon-Haldeman conversation of June 20, 1972

    Senate Committee announces discovery of 18 ½ minute gap on tape of Nixon-Haldeman conversation of June 20, 1972
    President Nixon's secretary, Rose Mary Woods, on September 29, 1973, was reviewing a tape of the June 20, 1972, recordings when she said she had made "a terrible mistake" during transcription. While playing the tape on a Uher 5000, she answered a phone call. Reaching for the Uher 5000 stop button, she said that she mistakenly hit the button next to it, the record button. For the duration of the phone call, about 5 minutes, she kept her foot on the device's pedal, causing a fi
  • Special Prosecutor issues subpoena for 64 White House tapes.

    Special Prosecutor issues subpoena for 64 White House tapes.
    Prosecutor Leon Jaworski issues a subpoena for 64 formerly secret Watergate tapes. The case was decided in the supreme court.
  • House Judiciary Committee adopts article I of impeachment resolution against the President.

    House Judiciary Committee adopts article I of impeachment resolution against the President.
    The House Judiciary Committee adopts the first Article of Impeachment by a vote of 27-11. All the Democrats, and six Republicans, vote for impeachment. The Article charges President Richard Nixon with obstructing the investigation of the Watergate break-in.
  • House Judiciary Committee adopts article II of impeachment resolution against the President.

    House Judiciary Committee adopts article II of impeachment resolution against the President.
    The House Judiciary Committee adopts the second Article of Impeachment against President Nixon. This one charges Nixon with misuse of power and violation of his oath of office.
  • House Judiciary Committee adopts article III of impeachment resolution against the President.

    House Judiciary Committee adopts article III of impeachment resolution against the President.
    The House Judiciary Committee adopts the third Article of Impeachment. The third Article charges President Nixon with failure to comply with House subpoenas.
  • President Richard Nixon resigns.

    President Richard Nixon resigns.
    The scandal escalated, costing Nixon much of his political support, and on August 9, 1974, he resigned in the face of almost certain impeachment and removal from office. After his resignation, he controversially received a pardon issued by his successor, Gerald Ford. In retirement, Nixon's work as an elder statesman, authoring several books and undertaking many foreign trips, helped to rehabilitate his public image.
  • President Gerald Ford pardons former President Nixon.

    President Gerald Ford pardons former President Nixon.
    President Gerald Ford pardoned Richard Nixon, his disgraced predecessor, for any crimes, spawned by the Watergate scandal, that he might have committed or participated in while in office. In accepting the pardon, Nixon said: “That the way I tried to deal with Watergate was the wrong way is a burden I shall bear for every day of the life that is left to me.”