Deadly Tsunamis Ryan Engle

  • The 1755 Lisbon Portugal Earthquake

    The 1755 Lisbon Portugal Earthquake
    The 1755 Lisbon earthquake, also known as the Great Lisbon earthquake, impacted on Portugal on the morning of Saturday, 1 November, Feast of All Saints, at around 09:40 local time. In combination with subsequent fires and a tsunami, the earthquake almost totally destroyed Lisbon and adjoining areas. Estimates place the death toll in Lisbon alone at between 30,000 and 50,000 people, making it one of the deadliest earthquakes in history.
  • The 1883 Krakatoa explosion

    The 1883 Krakatoa explosion
    The eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history and explosions were so violent that they were heard 3,110 kilometers (1,930 mi) away in Perth, Western Australia, and Rodrigues near Mauritius, 4,800 kilometers (3,000 mi) away.[1] At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created.
  • The 1946 Aleutians, Alaska Earthquake

    The 1946 Aleutians, Alaska Earthquake
    The 1946 Aleutian Islands earthquake occurred near the Aleutian Islands, Alaska on April 1. The shock had a moment magnitude of 8.6 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VI (Strong). It resulted in 165–173 casualties and over $26 million in damage. The seafloor along the fault was elevated, triggering a Pacific-wide tsunami with multiple destructive waves at heights ranging from 45–130 ft.
  • The 1960 Chile Earthquake

    The 1960 Chile Earthquake
    The 1960 Valdivia earthquake or the Great Chilean earthquake (Gran terremoto de Chile) on 22 May 1960 was the most powerful earthquake ever recorded. Various studies have placed it at 9.4–9.6 on the moment magnitude scale.[1] It occurred in the afternoon (19:11 GMT, 15:11 local time), and lasted for approximately 10 minutes. The resulting tsunamis affected southern Chile, Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, eastern New Zealand, southeast Australia, and the Aleutian Islands.
  • The 1964 Alaska Earthquake

    The 1964 Alaska Earthquake
    The 1964 Alaskan earthquake, also known as the Great Alaskan earthquake and Good Friday earthquake, occurred at 5:36 PM AKST on Good Friday, March 27. Across south-central Alaska, ground fissures, collapsing structures, and tsunamis resulting from the earthquake caused about 131 deaths. Lasting 4:38, the magnitude 9.2 mega-thrust earthquake remains the most powerful earthquake recorded in North American history, and second most powerful earthquake recorded in world history.
  • The 1993 Sea Of Japan Earthquake

    The 1993 Sea Of Japan Earthquake
    The 1993 southwest-off Hokkaido earthquake (北海道南西沖地震, Hokkaido Nansei Oki Jishin) occurred at 13:17:12 UTC on 12 July 1993 in the Sea of Japan near the island of Hokkaido. It triggered a major tsunami that caused deaths on Hokkaido and in southeastern Russia, with a total of 230 fatalities recorded.
  • The 1998 Papua New Guinea Earthquake

    The 1998 Papua New Guinea Earthquake
    The 1998 Papua New Guinea earthquake occurred on July 17 with a moment magnitude of 7.0 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe). The event occurred on a reverse fault near the north coast region of Papua New Guinea, 25 kilometers (16 mi) from the coast near Aitape, and caused a large undersea landslide which caused a tsunami that hit the coast, killing between at least 2,183 and 2,700 people and injuring thousands.
  • The 2004 Sumatra Earthquake

    The 2004 Sumatra Earthquake
    The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami occurred on 26 December, It was an undersea megathrust earthquake that registered a magnitude of 9.1–9.3 Mw, reaching a Mercalli intensity up to IX in certain areas. The earthquake was caused by a rupture along the fault between the Burma Plate and the Indian Plate. The tsunamis killed an estimated 227,898 people in 14 countries, making it one of the deadliest natural disasters in recorded history.
  • The 2009 Samoa Earthquake

    The 2009 Samoa Earthquake
    The 2009 Samoa earthquake and tsunami took place on 29 September 2009 in the southern Pacific Ocean adjacent to the Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone. The submarine earthquake occurred in an extensional environment and had a moment magnitude of 8.1 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VI (Strong). More than 189 people were killed, especially children, most of them in Samoa.
  • The 2010 Chile Earthquake

    The 2010 Chile Earthquake
    The earthquake triggered a tsunami which devastated several coastal towns in south-central Chile and damaged the port at Talcahuano. Tsunami warnings were issued in 53 countries. The earthquake also generated a blackout that affected 93 percent of the Chilean population and which went on for several days in some locations. 525 people lost their lives, 25 people went missing, and about 9% of the population in the affected regions lost their homes.
  • The 2011 Japan Earthquake

    The 2011 Japan Earthquake
    It was the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in Japan, and the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world. The tsunami swept the Japanese mainland and killed over ten thousand people, mainly through drowning, though blunt trauma also caused many deaths. The latest report from the Japanese National Police Agency report confirms 15,899 deaths, 6,157 injured, and 2,529 people missing,863 people were still living away from their home in either temporary housing or due to permanent relocation.