The Northwest Rebellion

  • The Battle of Duck Lake

    The Battle of Duck Lake
    Louis Riel saw the war that was approaching with the Métis and Aboriginals and knew he had to lead them. He chose Gabriel Dumont [ Military Commander ] to fight the war. They used guerrila tactics of 150 - 200 Métis and Cree warriors against the North-West Mounted Police. Causing the North-West Mounted Police to retreat with these tactics, Dumont and his troops were victorious.
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    The Northwest Rebellion

  • The Massacre at Frog Lake- Part One

    The Massacre at Frog Lake- Part One
    In Frog Lake Saskatchewan, a Plains Cree raiding party attacked Frog Lake. An Indian Agent by the name of Thomas Quinn was the main target point of this attack. The reason for him as the focus of the attack was because he treated the Cree horribly. When he denied the question of being held captive, he was then shot down, and along with eight ' white men ' as well.
  • The Battle of Fish Creek

    The Battle of Fish Creek
    Gabriel Dumont planned approximately 150 First Nations and Mètis fighters to once again use the guerrilla tactics against the government troops at Fish Creek [ About 20 KM from Batoche ] The tactics have prevailed again like the Battle of Duck Lake. The government troops had called reinforcements but eventually both lost and withdrew from the area, causing them to retreat. Dumont and his troops were victorious again!
  • The Battle of Cut Knife

    The Battle of Cut Knife
    A group force of Cree and Assiniboine with their leader, War Chief Fine Day had encountered a government military force at Cut Knife. They government military was nearly surrounded by War Chief Fine Day's troops. A Cree chief by the name of Chief Poundmaker compelled the fighters not to pursue the military army. The military government then fleed, but the casualties were fewer than they would've been.
  • The Battle of Batoche- Part One

    The Battle of Batoche- Part One
    A military error occured. . . Louis Riel was unpleased with the progress Garbiel Dumont had done so far. He commended Dumont to stop his guerrilla campaign and organize some troops to defend Batoche instead of ambushing them. Concentrating their efforts on one point, they were ready to start their defensive maneuver.
  • The Battle of Batoche- Part Two

    The Battle of Batoche- Part Two
    The government troops has arrived at Batoche, equipped with their weapons and other equipment with them. Nine Hundred soldiers were what Riel and Dumont as well as the other troops were up against. They only had an army of 300 Métis, Dakota, and Cree defenders of Batoche. As you can predict, the defenders resisted to give in, but eventually the goverment claimed Batoche causing Riel, Dumont, and the rest of the troops to surrender. . . [ The battle lasted from May 9th to May 12th ]
  • The Battle of Batoche- Part Three

    The Battle of Batoche- Part Three
    Louis Riel had surrendered and been brought into court with the charge of treason. Riel continued to fight as the trial went on through, but couldn't change the thoughts of the juries. He was then executed. . . Gabriel Dumont and other participants fled and escaped across the border to the Montana Region of the United States.
  • The Battle of Frenchman's Butte- Part One

    The Battle of Frenchman's Butte- Part One
    A force of Cree fighters led by Chief Big Bear dug in on a hillside near Frenchman's Butte so that they could escape. Because they were on a hillside, this held as an advantage for the Cree to battle, because the upfront of the hillside was a ' suicidal spot ' [ Meaning, anyone who goes upfront will die easily before making it past the Cree ] Major General, Thomas Bland Strange who led his military forces withdrew. He then plotted them along the bottom side of the valley for another attack. . .
  • The Battle of Frenchman's Butte- Part Two

    The Battle of Frenchman's Butte- Part Two
    The North-West Mounted Police were scattered below the hillside, but the Cree still had their advantages. The sides exchanged fire power and gun shots until eventually Thomas Bland Strange ordered Major Sam Steele to lead the North-West Mounted Police to the north-side and out flank the Cree from there. The Cree foresaw this outcome, and then open fired at Steele. This led Thomas to thinking if they had fewer forces than the Cree, and they retreated.
  • The Battle of Loon Lake

    The Battle of Loon Lake
    Major Sam Steele, a force of North-West Mounted Police, Alberta Mounted Rifles and Steele's Scouts caught up with and dispersed a group of Cree warriors and their white and Métis hostages. Cree scouts made a determined stand with what was left of their ammunition, but the body of the Cree column, realizing the hopelessness of their situation, released their prisoners and fled.
  • The Massacre at Frog Lake- Part Two // Extra

    The Massacre at Frog Lake- Part Two // Extra
    For the roles in the Frog Lake Massacre, six Cree men were hanged. The Métis military forces did not battle the Canadian army, but an independent seperate band of warriors. These warriors were lead by the mistreatment and hunger they suffered through. [ In a way it would be called, ' revenge ' ] This incident was different from the battles of the Northwest Rebellion. This incident had now influenced the reaction of the North-West Mounted Police as well as the settlers.