The American Revolution

Timeline created by jamarigreen
In History
  • Enlightenment

    Enlightenment
    The Age of Enlightenment was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century, the "Century of Philosophy". Some consider the publication of Isaac Newton's Principia Mathematica as the first major enlightenment work.
  • French & Indian war

    French & Indian war
    The French and Indian War pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies.
  • stamp act of 1765

    stamp act of 1765
    The new tax was imposed on all American colonists and required them to pay a tax on every piece of printed paper they used. Ship's papers, legal documents, licenses, newspapers, other publications, and even playing cards were taxed.
  • Sons of liberty

    Sons of liberty
    The Sons of Liberty was a secret organization that was created in the Thirteen American Colonies to advance the rights of the European colonists and to fight taxation by the British government. It played a major role in most colonies in battling the Stamp Act in 1765.
  • Townshend act of 1767

    Townshend act of 1767
    Image result for townshend act of 1767www.history.com
    The Townshend Acts were a series of laws passed by the British government on the American colonies in 1767. They placed new taxes and took away some freedoms from the colonists including the following: New taxes on imports of paper, paint, lead, glass, and tea.
  • Boston Massacre

    Boston Massacre
    The Boston Massacre was a deadly riot that occurred on March 5, 1770, on King Street in Boston. It began as a street brawl between American colonists and a lone British soldier, but quickly escalated to a chaotic, bloody slaughter. The conflict energized anti-British sentiment and paved the way for the American Revolution.
  • Boston tea party

    Boston tea party
    The Boston Tea Party was a political and mercantile protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1773.
  • Intolerable acts

    Intolerable acts
    The Intolerable Acts were five laws that were passed by the British Parliament against the American Colonies in 1774.
  • Battles of Lexington and Concord

    Battles of Lexington and Concord
    The Battles of Lexington and Concord, fought on April 19, 1775, kicked off the American Revolutionary War (1775-83). Tensions had been building for many years between residents of the 13 American colonies and the British authorities, particularly in Massachusetts
  • Battle Of Yorktown

    Battle Of Yorktown
    In the fall of 1781, a combined American force of Colonial and French troops laid siege to the British Army at Yorktown, Virginia. they began their final attack on October 14th, capturing two British defenses and leading to the surrender, just days later, of British General Lord Cornwallis and nearly 9,000 troops. Yorktown proved to be the final battle of the American Revolution, and the British began peace negotiations shortly after the American victory.
  • treaty of pairs signed

    treaty of pairs signed
    The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, ended the American Revolutionary War.
  • treaty of paris signed

    treaty of paris signed
    The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, ended the American Revolutionary War.
  • great compromise

    great compromise
    he Great Compromise was forged in a heated dispute during the 1787 Constitutional Convention: States with larger populations wanted congressional representation based on population, while smaller states demanded equal representation. To keep the convention from dissolving into chaos, the founding fathers came up with the Great Compromise
  • Constitutuin is Ratified

    Constitutuin is Ratified
    It took 10 months for the first nine states to approve the Constitution. The first state to ratify was Delaware, on December 7, 1787, by a unanimous vote, 30 - 0. The featured document is an endorsed ratification of the federal Constitution by the Delaware convention.
  • Bill Of Rights Adopted

    Bill Of Rights Adopted
    After the Declaration of Independence in 1776, the Founding Fathers turned to the composition of the states’ and then the federal Constitution. Although a Bill of Rights to protect the citizens was not initially deemed important, the Constitution’s supporters realized it was crucial to achieving ratification. Thanks largely to the efforts of James Madison, the Bill of Rights the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified on December 15, 1791.