Roaring 20's

Timeline created by pxstelboy
In History
  • The IBM Corporation is founded

    The IBM Corporation is founded
    International Business Machines Corporation is an American multinational information technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries.
  • The Palmer Raids arrest and deport over 6,000 suspected "radicals"

    The Palmer Raids arrest and deport over 6,000 suspected "radicals"
    The U.S. Department of Justice, under the leadership of the Attorney General Alexander M. Palmer, sought to arrest and/or deport all radicals and anarchists living in the United States.
  • The 18th Amendment goes into effect

    The 18th Amendment goes into effect
    The USA prohibits the sale of alcoholic beverages
  • The League of Nations is founded

    The League of Nations is founded
    League of Nations was an international organization that was created after the First World War
  • Sacco and Vanzetti Trail concludes

    Sacco and Vanzetti Trail concludes
    Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were Italian-born American anarchists who were controversially convicted of murdering a guard and a paymaster during the April 15, 1920 armed robbery of the Slater and Morrill Shoe Company in Braintree, Massachusetts, United States.
  • 19th amendment is ratified by congress

    19th amendment is ratified by congress
    The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. I
  • Radio station KDKA airs the first commercially broadcast program

    Radio station KDKA airs the first commercially broadcast program
    On November 2, 1920, station KDKA made the nation's first commercial broadcast (a term coined by Conrad himself). They chose that date because it was election day, and the power of radio was proven when people could hear the results of the Harding-Cox presidential race before they read about it in the newspaper.
  • Langston Hughes publishes his first set of poems

    Langston Hughes publishes his first set of poems
  • Reader's Digest is founded

    Reader's Digest is founded
    Reader's Digest was found in 1992 which is a family magazine
  • Warren G. Harding is elected president

    Warren G. Harding is elected president
    Warren was elected president on March 4, 1991 - August 2, 1923
  • First game in the newly build Yankee Stadium is played

    First game in the newly build Yankee Stadium is played
    April 18, 1923 the Yankee Stadium was opened for major league baseball. In the historic first game, the Yankees defeated the Boston Red Sox 4-1.
  • President Calvin Coolidge is elected president

    President Calvin Coolidge is elected president
    President Harding died unexpectedly while in office, so the vice president, Calvin Coolidge, stepped up. Coolidge succeeded to the presidency on August 3, 1923
  • President Warren G. Harding dies

    President Warren G. Harding dies
    Warren G. Harding dies in San Francisco, California by a heart attack but there was no autopsy conducted
  • Adolf Hitler leads a failed attempt to overthrow the German Government

    Adolf Hitler leads a failed attempt to overthrow the German Government
    From November 8 to November 9, 1923, Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) and his followers staged the Beer Hall Putsch in Munich, a failed takeover of the government in Bavaria
  • Rhapsody in Blues comes out

    Rhapsody in Blues comes out
    Rhapsody in Blue is a musical composition by George Gershwin for solo piano and jazz band written in 1924, which combines elements of classical music with jazz-influenced effects.
  • The first Winter Olympics are held

    The first Winter Olympics are held
    The first Olympics took place in France in 1924
  • The National Origins act was passed

    The National Origins act was passed
    The Immigration Act of 1924 limited the number of immigrants allowed entry into the United States through a national origins quota. The quota provided immigration visas to two percent of the total number of people of each nationality in the United States as of the 1890 national census.
  • The Great Gatsby is published

    The Great Gatsby is published
    F. Scott Fitzgerald published a book called The Great Gatsby which captured the mood of the 1920s
  • Scopes Monkey Trial begins in Dayton, TN

    Scopes Monkey Trial begins in Dayton, TN
    Scopes appeared in a Dayton courtroom to stand trial. He was represented by one of the most famous lawyers of the time, Clarence Darrow.
  • Adolf Hitler publishes Mein Kampf

    Adolf Hitler publishes Mein Kampf
    Adolf Hitler publishes a book called Mein Kampf (My Struggle)
  • The Ford Motor Company announces the creation of a 40 hour work weel

    The Ford Motor Company announces the creation of a 40 hour work weel
    Ford Motor Company becomes one of the first companies in America to adopt a five-day, 40-hour week for workers in its automotive factories.
  • Gertrude Ederle is the first woman to swim the English Channel

    Gertrude Ederle is the first woman to swim the English Channel
    Gertrude Caroline Ederle was an American competition swimmer, Olympic champion, and former world record-holder in five events. On August 6, 1926, she became the first woman to swim across the English Channel. Among other nicknames, the press sometimes called her "Queen of the Waves."
  • The Great Mississippi Flood displaces 700,000 people

    The Great Mississippi Flood displaces 700,000 people
    The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 was the most destructive river flood in the history of the United States, with 27,000 square miles inundated up to a depth of 30 feet. To try to prevent future floods, the federal government built the world's longest system of levees and floodways.
  • Charles Lindberg makes the first non-stop Trans-Atlantic flight

    Charles Lindberg makes the first non-stop Trans-Atlantic flight
    In the early morning of Friday, May 20, 1927, Lindbergh took off from Roosevelt Field across the Atlantic Ocean for Paris, France.
  • Babe Ruth hits 60 home runs

    Babe Ruth hits 60 home runs
    Babe Ruth hits his 60th home run on the 1927 season and it sets a record that would stand for 34 years
  • The Holland Tunnel connecting NYC and NJ opens

    The Holland Tunnel connecting NYC and NJ opens
    The Holland Tunnel is a vehicular tunnel under the Hudson River. It connects Manhattan in New York City, New York, to the east, and Jersey City, New Jersey, to the west. An integral conduit within the New York metropolitan area, the Holland Tunnel is operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
  • The first film with out "The Jazz Singer" debuts

    The first film with out "The Jazz Singer" debuts
    The Jazz Singer, the first commercially successful full-length feature film with sound, debuts at the Blue Mouse Theater at 1421 5th Avenue in Seattle.
  • Alexander Fleming discovers Penicillin

    Alexander Fleming discovers Penicillin
    discovered penicillin, made from the Penicillium notatum mold, but he did not receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery until 1945
  • Mickey Mouse makes his first appearance in the short film "Steamboat Willie"

    Mickey Mouse makes his first appearance in the short film "Steamboat Willie"
    Steamboat Willie premieres and shows the world a new animated character who is Mickey Mouse
  • Chicago's St. Valentine's Day Massacre

    Chicago's St. Valentine's Day Massacre
    The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre is the name given to the 1929 Valentine's Day murder of seven members and associates of Chicago's North Side Gang.
  • Herbert Hoover was elected president

    Herbert Hoover was elected president
    Herbert Hoover was an American engineer, business man and politician as was the 31st president
  • Stock Market crashes on 'Black Tuesday'

    Stock Market crashes on 'Black Tuesday'
    October 29, 1929. On this date, share prices on the New York Stock Exchange completely collapsed, becoming a pivotal factor in the emergence of the Great Depression.
  • Amelia Earhart attempts to fly around the world

    Amelia Earhart attempts to fly around the world
    Amelia Earhart attempts to fly across the world in March of 1937 but she was never seen agian
  • Ellis Island closes as an immigration point to the United States

    Ellis Island closes as an immigration point to the United States
    After its opening, Ellis Island was again expanded, and additional structures were built. By the time it closed on November 12, 1954, 12 million immigrants had been processed by the U.S. Bureau of Immigration.
  • The Teapot Dome Scandal is uncovered

    The Teapot Dome Scandal is uncovered
    Warren Harding transferred supervision of naval oil-reserve lands which soon the Mammoth Oil Company had exclusive rights to the Teapot Dome