progressive era

  • Rise of KKK (early 20thcentury)

    Rise of KKK (early 20thcentury)
    The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) is an American white supremacist terrorist hate group founded in 1865
  • Tuskegee Institute

    Tuskegee Institute
    Tuskegee University is a private, historically black land-grant university in Tuskegee, Alabama. The campus is designated as the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site by the National Park Service. The university was home to scientist George Washington Carver and to World War II's Tuskegee Airmen
  • Chinese Exclusion Act

    Chinese Exclusion Act
    The Chinese Exclusion Act was a United States federal law signed by President Chester A. Arthur on May 6, 1882, prohibiting all immigration of Chinese laborers.
  • Interstate Commerce Act

    Interstate Commerce Act
    The Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 is a United States federal law that was designed to regulate the railroad industry, particularly its monopolistic practices. The Act required that railroad rates be "reasonable and just," but did not empower the government to fix specific rates.
  • Muckrackers

    Muckrackers
    The muckrakers were reform-minded journalists in the Progressive Era in the United States who exposed established institutions and leaders as corrupt. They typically had large audiences in popular magazines.
  • Sherman Antitrust Act

    Sherman Antitrust Act
    The Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 is a United States antitrust law which prescribes the rule of free competition among those engaged in commerce. It was passed by Congress and is named for Senator John Sherman, its principal author.
  • W.E.B. Dubois

    W.E.B. Dubois
    William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was an American sociologist, socialist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, writer and editor
  • Niagara Movement

    Niagara Movement
    Niagara Movement, (1905–10), organization of black intellectuals that was led by W.E.B. Du Bois and called for full political, civil, and social rights for African Americans. This stance stood in notable contrast to the accommodation philosophy proposed by Booker T. Washington in the Atlanta Compromise of 1895.
  • Plessy V. Ferguson

    Plessy V. Ferguson
    Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537, was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that racial segregation laws did not violate the U.S. Constitution as long as the facilities for each race were equal in quality, a doctrine that came to be known as "separate but equal".
  • McKinley Assassinated

    McKinley Assassinated
    William McKinley, the 25th president of the United States, was shot on the grounds of the Pan-American Exposition at the Temple of Music in Buffalo, New York, on September 6, 1901, six months into his second term. He was shaking hands with the public when anarchist Leon Czolgosz shot him twice in the abdomen
  • Coal Miner Strike-1902

    Coal Miner Strike-1902
    Coal strikes. The Coal strike of 1902 (also known as the anthracite coal strike) was a strike by the United Mine Workers of America in the anthracite coalfields of eastern Pennsylvania. Miners striked for higher wages, shorter workdays, and the recognition of their union.
  • Ida Tarbell-“The History of Standard Oil”

    Ida Tarbell-“The History of Standard Oil”
    The History of the Standard Oil Company is a 1904 book by journalist Ida Tarbell. It is an exposé about the Standard Oil Company, run at the time by oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, the richest figure in American history.
  • The JunglePublished

    The JunglePublished
    Upton Sinclair published The Jungle in 1906, which revealed conditions in the meat packing industry in the United States and was a major factor in the establishment of the Pure Food and Drug Act.
  • Roosevelt-Antiquities Act

    Roosevelt-Antiquities Act
    The Antiquities Act of 1906, was signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt on June 8, 1906. ... The Antiquities Act is the first law to establish that archeological sites on public lands are important public resources.
  • Federal Meat Inspection Act

    Federal Meat Inspection Act
    The Federal Meat Inspection Act of 1906 is an American law that makes it illegal to adulterate or misbrand meat and meat products being sold as food, and ensures that meat and meat products are slaughtered and processed under strictly regulated sanitary conditions
  • Food and Drug Act

    Food and Drug Act
    The Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 was the first of a series of significant consumer protection laws which was enacted by Congress in the 20th century and led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration
  • Teddy Roosevelt’s-Square Deal

    Teddy Roosevelt’s-Square Deal
    The Square Deal was Theodore Roosevelt's domestic program, which reflected his three major goals: conservation of natural resources, control of corporations, and consumer protection. These three demands are often referred to as the "three Cs" of Roosevelt's Square Deal.
  • Taft Wins

    Taft Wins
    The Campaign and Election of 1908: After his 1904 electoral victory, Theodore Roosevelt promised publicly not to seek the presidency again in 1908
  • Muller v. Oregon

    Muller v. Oregon
    Muller v. Oregon (1908) is a U.S. Supreme Court case in which the Court considered whether a state could limit the amount of hours a woman could work
  • 16th Amendment

    16th Amendment
    The Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states on the basis of population. It was passed by Congress in 1909 in response to the 1895 Supreme Court case of Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co.
  • NAACP formed

    NAACP formed
    The NAACP or National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was established in 1909 and is America's oldest and largest civil rights organization. It was formed in New York City by white and Black activists, partially in response to the ongoing violence against African Americans around the country.
  • Jane Addams-Hull House

    Jane Addams-Hull House
    Hull House was a settlement house in Chicago, Illinois, United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. Located on the Near West Side of the city, Hull House opened to serve recently arrived European immigrants. By 1911, Hull House had expanded to 13 buildings.
  • Triangle Shirtwaist fire

    Triangle Shirtwaist fire
    The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, on March 25, 1911, was the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of the city, and one of the deadliest in U.S. history
  • Wilson Elected

    Wilson Elected
    Wilson defeated incumbent Republican William Howard Taft and third-party nominee Theodore Roosevelt to easily win the 1912 United States presidential election
  • Department of Labor Established

    Department of Labor Established
    The Department of Labor (DoL) is a United States executive department formed in 1913 to help workers, job seekers, and retirees by creating standards for occupational safety, wages, hours, and benefits and by compiling economic statistics.
  • Underwood-Simmons Tariff

    Underwood-Simmons Tariff
    The Revenue Act of 1913, also known as the Underwood Tariff or the Underwood-Simmons Act, re-established a federal income tax in the United States and substantially lowered tariff rates.
  • 17th Amendment

    17th Amendment
    The Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution established the direct election of United States senators in each state. The amendment supersedes Article I, §3, Clauses 1 and 2 of the Constitution, under which senators were elected by state legislatures
  • Federal Reserve Act

    Federal Reserve Act
    The Federal Reserve Act was passed by the 63rd United States Congress and signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson on December 23, 1913. The law created the Federal Reserve System, the central banking system of the United States.
  • Federal trade Commission

    Federal trade Commission
    a federal agency, established in 1914, that administers antitrust and consumer protection legislation in pursuit of free and fair competition in the marketplace.
  • Federal Trade Commission Act

    Federal Trade Commission Act
    The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 established the Federal Trade Commission. The Act was signed into law by US President Woodrow Wilson in 1914 and outlaws unfair methods of competition and unfair acts or practices that affect commerce
  • Clayton Antitrust Act

    Clayton Antitrust Act
    The Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914, is a part of United States antitrust law with the goal of adding further substance to the U.S. antitrust law regime; the Clayton Act seeks to prevent anticompetitive practices in their incipiency.
  • Booker T. Washington

    Booker T. Washington
    Booker Taliaferro Washington was an American educator, author, orator, and adviser to several presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African American community and of the contemporary black elite
  • The Birth of a Nation (1915)

    The Birth of a Nation (1915)
    The Birth of a Nation is three hours of racist propaganda — starting with the Civil War and ending with the Ku Klux Klan riding in to save the South from black rule during the Reconstruction era.
  • Lusitania sunk

    Lusitania sunk
    The sinking of the Lusitania refers to the torpedoing and sinking of the passenger ship, Lusitania, by a German submarine during WWI. Of the 1,198 people who died, 128 were Americans. The tragedy swayed American public opinion towards intervening in the war.
  • Zimmerman Telegram

    Zimmerman Telegram
    The Zimmermann Telegram (or Zimmermann Note or Zimmerman Cable) was a secret diplomatic communication issued from the German Foreign Office in January 1917 that proposed a military alliance between Germany and Mexico if the United States entered World War I against Germany.
  • Espionage Act

    Espionage Act
    The Espionage Act of 1917 prohibited obtaining information, recording pictures, or copying descriptions of any information relating to the national defense with intent or reason to believe that the information may be used for the injury of the United States or to the advantage of any foreign nation.
  • Wilson Asks for War

    Wilson Asks for War
    President Woodrow Wilson asks Congress to send U.S. troops into battle against Germany in World War I.
  • Hammer v. Dagenhart

    Hammer v. Dagenhart
    Dagenhart, (1918), legal case in which the Supreme Court of the United States struck down the Keating-Owen Act, which had regulated child labour. Dagenhart was overturned when the Court upheld the constitutionality of the Fair Labor Standards Act in U.S. v. ... Darby Lumber Company (1941).
  • Sedition Act

    Sedition Act
    In one of the first tests of freedom of speech, the House passed the Sedition Act, permitting the deportation, fine, or imprisonment of anyone deemed a threat or publishing “false, scandalous, or malicious writing” against the government of the United States
  • Trench Warfare

    Trench Warfare
    a type of combat in which opposing troops fight from trenches facing each other.
  • Wilson-Fourteen Points

    Wilson-Fourteen Points
    The Fourteen Points was a statement of principles for peace that was to be used for peace negotiations in order to end World War I. The principles were outlined in a January 8, 1918 speech on war aims and peace terms to the United States Congress by President Woodrow Wilson
  • Armistice Day

    Armistice Day
    the anniversary of the armistice of November 11, 1918, observed since 1954 as Veterans Day in the US.
  • Versailles Peace Conference

    Versailles Peace Conference
    The Paris Peace Conference convened in January 1919 at Versailles just outside Paris. The conference was called to establish the terms of the peace after World War I. ... The United Kingdom, France, and Italy fought together as the Allied Powers during the First World War.
  • Treaty of Versailles to Senate

    Treaty of Versailles to Senate
    The Senate Rejects the Treaty of Versailles. The Constitution grants the president power to negotiate treaties with foreign governments
  • 18th amendment

    18th amendment
    The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution–which banned the manufacture, transportation and sale of intoxicating liquors–ushered in a period in American history known as Prohibition.
  • Wilson Stroke

    Wilson Stroke
    President Woodrow Wilson, who had just cut short a tour of the country to promote the formation of the League of Nations, suffers a stroke on October 2, 1919
  • Urban League

    Urban League
    National Urban League, American service agency founded for the purpose of eliminating racial segregation and discrimination and helping African Americans and other minorities to participate in all phases of American life. ... By 1920 the national organization had assumed the shorter name, National Urban League.
  • League of Nations

    League of Nations
    The League of Nations was an international diplomatic group developed after World War I as a way to solve disputes between countries before they erupted into open warfare
  • 19th amendment

    19th amendment
    this amendment allowed women to vote
  • Jim Crow Laws

    Jim Crow Laws
    Jim Crow laws were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States.