Progressive era

  • W.E.B. Dubois

    W.E.B. Dubois
    William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was an American sociologist, socialist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, writer and editor
  • Tuskegee Institute

    Tuskegee Institute
    Tuskegee University is a private, historically black land-grant university in Tuskegee, Alabama. The campus is designated as the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site by the National Park Service. The university was home to scientist George Washington Carver and to World War II's Tuskegee Airmen
  • Chinese Exclusion act May 6, 1882

    Chinese Exclusion act May 6, 1882
    prohibiting all immigration of Chinese laborers.
  • Interstate Commerce Act

    Interstate Commerce Act
    regulating railroad rates
  • Jane Addams-Hull House

    Jane Addams-Hull House
    Hull House was a settlement house in Chicago, Illinois, United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. Located on the Near West Side of the city, Hull House opened to serve recently arrived European immigrants. By 1911, Hull House had expanded to 13 buildings
  • Booker T. Washington

    Booker Taliaferro Washington was an American educator, author, orator, and adviser to several presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African American community and of the contemporary black elite.
  • Sherman Antitrust Act

    Sherman Antitrust Act
    a federal statute which prohibits activities that restrict interstate commerce and competition in the marketplace.
  • Plessy V. Ferguson act

    Plessy V. Ferguson act
    Supreme Court decision that upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation under the “separate but equal” doctrine.
  • McKinley Assassinated

    McKinley Assassinated
    William McKinley was the 25th president of the United States was assassinated
  • Coal Miner Strike-1902

    Coal Miner Strike-1902
    On Friday, October 3, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt called a precedent-shattering meeting at the temporary White House at 22 Lafayette Place, Washington, D.C. A great strike in the anthracite coal fields of Pennsylvania threatened a coal famine.
  • Muckrakers

    Muckrakers
    The emergence of muckraking was heralded in the January 1903 issue of McClure's Magazine by articles on municipal government, labour, and trusts, written by Lincoln Steffens, Ray Stannard Baker, and Ida M. Tarbell.
  • Ida Tarbell- The History of Standard Oil

    Ida Tarbell- The History of Standard Oil
    The History of the Standard Oil Company is a 1904 book by journalist Ida Tarbell. It is an exposé about the Standard Oil Company, run at the time by oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, the richest figure in American history
  • Niagara Movement

    Niagara Movement
    Niagara Movement, (1905–10), organization of black intellectuals that was led by W.E.B. Du Bois and called for full political, civil, and social rights for African Americans. This stance stood in notable contrast to the accommodation philosophy proposed by Booker T. Washington in the Atlanta Compromise of 1895.
  • The Jungle Published

    The Jungle Published
    The Jungle is a 1906 novel by the American journalist and novelist Upton Sinclair. The novel portrays the harsh conditions and exploited lives of immigrants in the United States in Chicago and similar industrialized cities.
  • Roosevelt-Antiquities Act

    Roosevelt-Antiquities Act
    provide general protection for any general kind of cultural or natural resource. It established the first national historic preservation policy for the United States
  • Food and Drug Act

    Food and Drug Act
    Since 1879, nearly 100 bills had been introduced in Congress to regulate food and drugs; on 30 June 1906 President Roosevelt signed the Food and Drugs Act, known simply as the Wiley Act, a pillar of the Progressive era
  • Federal Meat Inspection Act

    Federal Meat Inspection Act
    The Meat Inspection Act of 1906 was a piece of U.S. legislation, signed by President Theodore Roosevelt on June 30, 1906, that prohibited the sale of adulterated or misbranded livestock and derived products as food and ensured sanitary slaughtering and processing of livestock.
  • Muller v. Oregon

    Muller v. Oregon
    A case in which the Court found that limiting the number of work hours for women did not violate the right to contract in the Fourteenth Amendment.
  • Taft Wins

    Taft Wins
    William H. Taft is elected President of the United States
  • 16th Amendment

    16th Amendment
    The Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states on the basis of population. It was passed by Congress in 1909 in response to the 1895 Supreme Court case of Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co
  • NAACP formed

    NAACP formed
    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is a civil rights organization in the United States, formed in 1909 as an interracial endeavor to advance justice for African Americans by a group including W. E. B. Du Bois, Mary White Ovington, Moorfield Storey and Ida B. Wells.
  • Urban League

    Urban League
    The National Urban League, formerly known as the National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes, is a nonpartisan historic civil rights organization based in New York City that advocates on behalf of economic and social justice for African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States.
  • Triangle Shirtwaist fire

    Triangle Shirtwaist fire
    The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, on March 25, 1911, was the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of the city, and one of the deadliest in U.S. history
  • Underwood-Simmons Tariff

    Underwood-Simmons Tariff
    Congress passed The Underwood Tariff Act in 1913. Its purpose was to reduce levies on manufactured and semi-manufactured goods and to eliminate duties on most raw materials.
  • Teddy Roosevelt’s- Square Deal

    Teddy Roosevelt’s- Square Deal
    Theodore Roosevelt's domestic program, which reflected his three major goals: conservation of natural resources, control of corporations, and consumer protection.
  • Department of Labor Established

    Department of Labor Established
    The United States Department of Labor is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government, responsible for occupational safety and health, wage and hour standards, unemployment benefits, reemployment services, and occasionally, economic statistics. Many U.S. states also have such departments.
  • Wilson Elected

    Wilson Elected
    Wilson defeated incumbent Republican William Howard Taft and third-party nominee Theodore Roosevelt to easily win the 1912 United States presidential election, becoming the first Southerner to do so since 1848.
  • 17th Amendment

    17th Amendment
    Seventeenth Amendment, amendment (1913) to the Constitution of the United States that provided for the direct election of U.S. senators by the voters of the states
  • Federal Reserve Act

    Federal Reserve Act
    The 1913 Federal Reserve Act is legislation in the United States that created the Federal Reserve System. 1 Congress passed the Federal Reserve Act to establish economic stability in the U.S. by introducing a central bank to oversee monetary policy.
  • Clayton Antitrust Act

    Clayton Antitrust Act
    The Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914 continues to regulate U.S. business practices today. Intended to strengthen earlier antitrust legislation, the act prohibits anticompetitive mergers, predatory and discriminatory pricing, and other forms of unethical corporate behavior.
  • Federal trade Commission

    Federal trade Commission
    The Federal Trade Commission is an independent agency of the United States government whose principal mission is the enforcement of civil U.S. antitrust law and the promotion of consumer protection. The FTC shares jurisdiction over federal civil antitrust enforcement with the Department of Justice Antitrust Division.
  • Federal Trade Commission Act

    Federal Trade Commission Act
    The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 was a United States federal law which established the Federal Trade Commission. The Act was signed into law by US President Woodrow Wilson in 1914 and outlaws unfair methods of competition and unfair acts or practices that affect commerce
  • The Birth of a Nation (1915)

    The Birth of a Nation (1915)
    The Birth of a Nation, originally called The Clansman, is a 1915 American silent epic drama film directed by D. W. Griffith and starring Lillian Gish.
  • Rise of KKK (early 20th century)

    Rise of KKK (early 20th century)
    Founded in 1865, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) extended into almost every southern state by 1870 and became a vehicle for white southern resistance to the Republican Party’s Reconstruction-era policies aimed at establishing political and economic equality for Black Americans.
  • 19th amendment

    19th amendment
    This amendment allowed women to vote