Period 4 Timeline

Timeline created by Brooke Dutterer
In History
  • Marbury v. Madison

    Marbury v. Madison
    William Marbury had been appointed Justice of the Peace in the District of Columbia, but his commission was not delivered. Marbury petitioned the Supreme Court to compel the new Secretary of State, James Madison, to deliver the documents. Marbury, joined by three other similarly situated appointees, petitioned for a writ of mandamus compelling the delivery of the commissions. This connects to 4.1 because it is expanding our government.
  • Louisana Purchase

    Louisana Purchase
    The Louisiana Purchase was a land deal between the United States and France, in which the U.S. acquired approximately 827,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River for $15 million.
    This little event, of France possessing herself of Louisiana, is the start of a tornado which will burst on the countries on both shores of the Atlantic and involve in it’s effects their highest destinies. This connects with 4.1 because it expanded the borders of the US.
  • Louis And Clark Expedition

    Louis And Clark Expedition
    The Lewis and Clark Expedition began in 1804, when President Thomas Jefferson tasked Meriwether Lewis with exploring lands west of the Mississippi River that comprised the Louisiana Purchase. Lewis chose William Clark as his co-leader for the mission. This connects to 4.3 because it expanded America borders.
  • Burr/Hamilton Duel

    Burr/Hamilton Duel
    In a duel held in Weehawken, New Jersey, Vice President Aaron Burr fatally shoots his long-time political antagonist Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton, a leading Federalist and the chief architect of America’s political economy, died the following day. This connects to 4.1 because it changed our government that benefitted the us.
  • Chesapeake-Leopard Affair

    Chesapeake-Leopard Affair
    The Chesapeake–Leopard Affair was a naval battle that took place off the coast of Norfolk, Virginia on June 22, 1807. The English warship HMS Leopard attacked and boarded the American USS Chesapeake. The British were looking for people who had deserted the Royal Navy. This connects to 4.2 because it gave us changes that benefitted the US.
  • Embargo Act

    Embargo Act
    The Embargo Act of 1807 was a law passed by the United State Congress. It prohibited American ships from trading in all foreign ports. This connects to 4.2 because they wanted was to change the US for good.
  • Nonintercourse Act of 1809

    Nonintercourse Act of 1809
    In the last sixteen days of President Thomas Jefferson's presidency the Congress replaced the Embargo Act of 1807 with the almost unenforceable Non-Intercourse Act of March 1809. This Act lifted all embargoes on American shipping except for those bound for British or French ports. This connects to 4.2 because it makes changes in the US for good and it makes the US even better than it was before.
  • Fletcher v. Peck

    Fletcher v. Peck
    In 1795, the Georgia state legislature passed a land grant awarding territory to four companies. The following year, the legislature voided the law and declared all rights and claims under it to be invalid. In 1800, John Peck acquired land that was part of the original legislative grant. He then sold the land to Robert Fletcher three years later, claiming that the land sales had been legitimate. This connects with 4.1 because it shaped our democracy.
  • Macon’s Bill No. 2

    Macon’s Bill No. 2
    Macon's Bill Number 2, which became law in the United States on May 14, 1810, was intended to motivate Great Britain and France to stop seizing American vessels during the Napoleonic Wars. This was a revision of the original bill by Representative Nathaniel Macon, known as Macon's Bill Number 1. This connects with 4.1 because it's expanding on our government.
  • Battle of Tippecanoe

    Battle of Tippecanoe
    The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought between American soldiers and Native American warriors along the banks of the Keth-tip-pe-can-nunk, a river in the heart of central Indiana. Following the Treaty of Fort Wayne, an 1809 agreement requiring Indiana tribes to sell three million acres of land to the United States government. This connects with 4.2 because it shaped the us government.
  • More information for War Of 1812

    More information for War Of 1812
  • War Of 1812

    War Of 1812
    In the War of 1812, the United States took on the greatest naval power in the world, Great Britain, in a conflict that would have an immense impact on the young country’s future. Causes of the war included British attempts to restrict U.S. trade, the Royal Navy’s impressment of American seamen and America’s desire to expand its territory. This connects with 4.2 because it made changes with our government.
  • Hartford Convention

    Hartford Convention
    The Hartford Convention was a series of meetings from December 15, 1814 to January 5, 1815, in Hartford, Connecticut, United States, in which the New England Federalist Party met to discuss their grievances concerning the ongoing War of 1812 and the political problems arising from the federal government's increasing concerns. This connects with 4.1 because it was expanding our government.
  • Treaty of Ghent

    Treaty of Ghent
    On December 24, 1814, The Treaty of Ghent was signed by British and American representatives at Ghent, Belgium, ending the War of 1812. By terms of the treaty, all conquered territory was to be returned, and commissions were planned. This connects to 4.3 because it is helping to develop alliances with other countries.
  • Cultural Nationalism

    Cultural Nationalism
    Cultural nationalism is a form of nationalism in which the nation is defined by a shared culture. It is an intermediate position between ethnic nationalism and civic nationalism. Therefore, it focuses on a national identity shaped by cultural traditions, but not on the concepts of common ancestry or race. This connects with 4.2 because they wanted to create American culture
  • Henry Clay’s American System

    Henry Clay’s American System
    The centerpiece of Clay’s statecraft was an integrated economic program called ‘the American System.’ This envisioned a protective tariff, a national bank jointly owned by private stockholders and the federal government, and federal subsidies for transportation projects. Public lands in the West were to be sold rather than given away to homesteaders so the proceeds could be used for education and internal improvements. This connects with 4.1 because it's creating a world wide system
  • Tariff of 1816

    Tariff of 1816
    The Tariff of 1816, also known as the Dallas Tariff, is notable as the first tariff passed by Congress with an explicit function of protecting U.S. manufactured items from overseas competition. Prior to the War of 1812, tariffs had primarily served to raise revenues to operate the national government. This connects with 4.1 because it is improving their government.
  • Rush Bagot Agreement

    Rush Bagot Agreement
    Rush–Bagot Agreement, exchange of notes between Richard Rush, acting U.S. secretary of state, and Charles Bagot, British minister to the United States, that provided for the limitation of naval forces on the Great Lakes in the wake of the War of 1812. Each country was allowed no more than one vessel on Lake Champlain, one on Lake Ontario, and two on the upper lakes. This connects with 4.3 because of foreign trades.
  • American Colonization Society

    American Colonization Society
    The roots of the colonization movement date back to various plans first proposed in the eighteenth century. From the start, colonization of free blacks in Africa was an issue on which both whites and blacks were divided. Some blacks supported emigration because they thought that black Americans would never receive justice in the United States. This connects with 4.2 because it's expanding American culture.
  • More information for Era Of Good Feelings

    More information for Era Of Good Feelings
  • More information for Treaty Of 1818

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  • The Treaty Of 1818

    The Treaty Of 1818
    The Treaty of 1818 was a treaty between the United States and Great Britain which resolved most long standing border issues between the U.S. and British North America (Canada). This connects with 4.2 because it gave us less war to be concerned about.
  • Panic Of 1919

    Panic Of 1919
    The Panic of 1819 was the first major peacetime financial crisis in the United States. It was followed by a general collapse of the American economy that persisted through 1821. The Panic heralded the transition of the nation from its colonial commercial status with Europe toward an independent economy. This connects with 4.3 because the US wanted to cut ties with Europe.
  • McCulloch v. Maryland

    McCulloch v. Maryland
    In 1816, Congress chartered The Second Bank of the United States. In 1818, the state of Maryland passed legislation to impose taxes on the bank. James W. McCulloch, the cashier of the Baltimore branch of the bank, refused to pay the tax. The state appeals court held that the Second Bank was unconstitutional because the Constitution did not provide a textual commitment for the federal government to charter a bank. This connects to 4.1 because it contributed to the new government.
  • Florida Purchase Treaty

    Florida Purchase Treaty
    The Florida Treaty, was a treaty between the United States and Spain in 1819 that ceded Florida to the U.S. and defined the boundary between the U.S. and New Spain. This connects with 4.2 because it's expanding the US border's
  • Commonwealth System

    Commonwealth System
    The Commonwealth System was a broad system of state mercantilism. This system included legislative support for road and canal companies and grants of limited liability to help businesses start up. This connects with 4.1 because it is expanding on the government.
  • Tallmadge Amendment

    Tallmadge Amendment
    The Tallmadge Amendment was a proposed amendment to a bill regarding the admission of the Territory of Missouri to the Union, which requested that Missouri be admitted as a free state. This connects with 4.3 because it's expanding the US's borders.
  • Missouri Compromise

    Missouri Compromise
    As part of the compromise, slavery was prohibited north of the 36°30′ parallel, excluding Missouri. The 16th United States Congress passed the legislation on March 3, 1820, and President James Monroe signed it on March 6, 1820. This connects with 4.1 because it's expanding our democracy government.
  • Cohens v. Virginia

    Cohens v. Virginia
    Cohens v. Virginia, 19 U.S. 264, is a landmark case by the United States Supreme Court most notable for the Court's assertion of its power to review state supreme court decisions in criminal law matters when the defendant claims that their Constitutional rights have been violated.This goes with 4.1 because of expanding our government.
  • Gibbons v. Ogden

    Gibbons v. Ogden
    Gibbons v. Ogden, 22 U.S. 1, was a landmark decision in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the power to regulate interstate commerce, granted to Congress by the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution, encompassed the power to regulate navigation. This connects to 4.1 because it has to do with making our government.
  • Monroe Doctrine

    Monroe Doctrine
    DescriptionThe Monroe Doctrine was a United States policy of opposing European colonialism in the Americas beginning in 1823. This connects with 4.3 because it has to deal with cutting off ties with european nations.
  • “Corrupt Bargain” of 1824

    “Corrupt Bargain” of 1824
    To the surprise of many, the House elected John Quincy Adams over rival Andrew Jackson. It was widely believed that Clay, the Speaker of the House, convinced Congress to elect Adams, who then made Clay his Secretary of State. Jackson's supporters denounced this as a "corrupt bargain." This connects with 4.1 because it's the start of a new presidency.
  • More Information for Henry Clay's American System

    More Information for Henry Clay's American System
  • Erie Canal

    Erie Canal
    The Erie Canal was built between Albany and Buffalo, New York, in an effort to create easy transportation between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean via the Hudson River. ... The canal allowed people and goods to flow freely across the Appalachians, opening up the west for population and commercial expansion. This connects with 4.2 because it's expanding the US borders.
  • American Temperance Society

    American Temperance Society
    American Society for the Promotion of Temperance was a society established on February 13, 1826 in Boston, MA. Within five years there were 2,220 local chapters in the U.S. with 170,000 members who had taken a pledge to abstain from drinking distilled beverages. This connects to 4.2 because it's establishing protests.
  • “Tariff of Abominations”

    “Tariff of Abominations”
    DescriptionThe Tariff of 1828 was a protective tariff passed by the Congress of the United States on May 19, 1828, designed to protect industry in the Northern United States. This connects with 4.1 because it established laws.
  • American Peace Society founded

    American Peace Society founded
    DescriptionThe American Peace Society is a pacifist group founded upon the initiative of William Ladd, in New York City, May 8, 1828. It was formed by the merging of many state and local societies, from New York, Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, of which the oldest, the New York Peace Society
  • Revolution (Election) of 1828

    Revolution (Election) of 1828
    The Election of 1828 was a transforming event from several perspectives. Andrew Jackson's victory broke the line of presidents from Virginia and Massachusetts, and to many citizens represented the triumph of the common man. ... Also in this election, a new two-party system emerged. This connects to 4.1 because it goes with the government and improving it.
  • Spoils System

    Spoils System
    In politics and government, a spoils system is a practice in which a political party, after winning an election, gives government civil service jobs to its supporters, friends, and relatives as a reward. This connects to 4.1 because it was enforced with the government.
  • Peggy Eaton Affair

    Peggy Eaton Affair
    The Petticoat affair was an 1830-31 U.S. scandal involving members of President Andrew Jackson's Cabinet and their wives. This connects with 4.1 because it deals with government.
  • Indian Removal Act

    Indian Removal Act
    The Indian Removal Act was signed into law on May 28, 1830, by United States President Andrew Jackson. The law authorized the president to negotiate with southern Native American tribes for their removal to federal territory west of the Mississippi River in exchange for white settlement of their ancestral lands. This connects with 3.1 because it was one of the acts for the beginning of the government.
  • Nat Turner’s Rebellion

    Nat Turner’s Rebellion
    Nat Turner's Rebellion was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, in August 1831, led by Nat Turner. Rebel slaves killed from 55 to 65 people, at least 51 being white. This connects to 4.2 because it was a big change in the us at the time.
  • McCormick invents the Mechanical Reape

    McCormick invents the Mechanical Reape
    The mechanical reaper was invented by Cyrus McCormick in 1831. This machine was used by farmers to harvest crops mechanically. For hundreds of years, farmers and field workers had to harvest crops by hand using a sickle or other methods, which was an arduous task at best. This connects with 4.2 because it help expand agriculture.
  • Cherokee Nation v. Georgia

    Cherokee Nation v. Georgia
    DescriptionCherokee Nation v. Georgia, 30 U.S. 1, was a United States Supreme Court case. The Cherokee Nation sought a federal injunction against laws passed by the U.S. state of Georgia depriving them of rights within its boundaries, but the Supreme Court did not hear the case on its merits.
  • Trail Of Tears

    Trail Of Tears
    The Trail of Tears was a series of forced relocations of approximately 60,000 Native Americans in the United States from their ancestral homelands in the Southeastern United States, to areas to the west of the Mississippi River that had been designated as Indian Territory. This connects with 4.2 because it has to deal with the US and it becoming it's own country.
  • More information for Trail Of Tears

    More information for Trail Of Tears
  • Worchester v. Georgia

    Worchester v. Georgia
    Worchester v. Georgia, 31 U.S. 515, was a case in which the United States Supreme Court vacated the conviction of Samuel Worcester and held that the Georgia criminal statute that prohibited non-Native Americans from being present on Native American lands without a license from the state was unconstitutional. This connects with 4.1 because it's expanding our government.
  • Nullification Crisis

    Nullification Crisis
    The Nullification Crisis was a United States sectional political crisis in 1832–33, during the presidency of Andrew Jackson, which involved a confrontation between the state of South Carolina and the federal government. This connects 4.1 because it deals with government.
  • Jackson’s Bank War

    Jackson’s Bank War
    The Bank War refers to the political struggle that developed over the issue of rechartering the Second Bank of the United States during the presidency of Andrew Jackson. The affair resulted in the shutdown of the Bank and its replacement by state banks. This connects with 4.1 because it deals with government and how these effects had on the government.
  • American Antislavery Society

    American Antislavery Society
    The American Anti-Slavery Society was an abolitionist society founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan. Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave, was a key leader of this society who often spoke at its meetings. William Wells Brown was also a freed slave who often spoke at meetings. This connects with 4.2 because it was something that defined the time of American History.
  • Species Circular

    Species Circular
    The Species Circular is a United States presidential executive order issued by President Andrew Jackson in 1836 pursuant to the Coinage Act. It required payment for government land to be in gold and silver. This connects to 4.1 because there's an big part of the government.
  • The Alamo

    The Alamo
    DescriptionThe Alamo Mission in San Antonio, commonly called The Alamo and originally known as the Misión San Antonio de Valero, is a historic Spanish mission and fortress compound founded in the 18th century by Roman Catholic missionaries in what is now San Antonio, Texas, United States. This connects with 4.1 because it has to deal with government and forming them.
  • John Deere invents the Steele Plow

    John Deere invents the Steele Plow
    John Deere invented the steel plow in 1837 when the Middle-West was being settled. The soil was different than that of the East and wood plows kept breaking. ... He made his first plow out of an old blade saw. He then did tests on different types of soil. This connects with 4.2 because it made a bug change in agriculture and made it much easier for famers.
  • Panic of 1837

    Panic of 1837
    The Panic of 1837 was a financial crisis in the United States that touched off a major recession that lasted until the mid-1840s. Profits, prices, and wages went down while unemployment went up. Pessimism abounded during the time. The panic had both domestic and foreign origins. This connects with 4.1 because it has to deal with the government and the things they had to do to make the government stable.
  • Irish Potato Famine

    Irish Potato Famine
    The Great Famine, or the Great Hunger, was a period of mass starvation and disease in Ireland from 1845 to 1849. This connects with 4.3 because it goes with the cutting all ties off with alliances but exchanging different things.
  • Shakers

    Shakers
    The Shakers were a new religious movement founded by Ann Lee Stanley.The name "The Shakers" was based on their ecstatic dances that were a part of their worship. The Shakers believed that God had a male and female component. Furthermore, they believed that Ann Lee was the female component. This connects with 4.2 because it became a part of American culture.
  • Dorothea Dix and Mental Hospitals

    Dorothea Dix and Mental Hospitals
    Dorothea Dix played an instrumental role in the founding or expansion of more than 30 hospitals for the treatment of the mentally ill. She was a leading figure in those national and international movements that challenged the idea that people with mental disturbances could not be cured or helped. This connects with 4.1 because of this it became important for the government to deal with.
  • “Log Cabin and Hard Cider” Campaign of 1840

    “Log Cabin and Hard Cider” Campaign of 1840
    Whigs took advantage of this quip and declared that Harrison was "the log cabin and hard cider candidate", a man of the common people from the rough-and-tumble West. They depicted Harrison's opponent, President Martin Van Buren, as a wealthy snob who was out of touch with the people. This connects with 4.1 because this happened with the government when they were trying to establish it.
  • Brook Farm

    Brook Farm
    Brook Farm, also called the Brook Farm Institute of Agriculture and Education or the Brook Farm Association for Industry and Education, was a utopian experiment in communal living in the United States in the 1840s. This connects with 4.2 because of this discovery it made agriculture much easier.
  • Commonwealth v. Hunt

    Commonwealth v. Hunt
    Commonwealth v. Hunt, 45 Mass. 111 was a case in the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court on the subject of labor unions. Prior to Hunt the legality of labor combinations in America was uncertain. This connects with 4.1 because it helped make the government even better than it was.
  • Webster-Ashburton Treaty

    Webster-Ashburton Treaty
    The Webster–Ashburton Treaty, signed August 9, 1842, was a treaty that resolved several border issues between the United States and the British North American colonies. Signed under John Tyler's presidency, it resolved the Aroostook War, a nonviolent dispute over the location of the Maine–New Brunswick border. This connects with 4.3 because helped with different countries to have a good relationship with them.
  • Seneca Fall Convention

    Seneca Fall Convention
    Seneca Falls Convention was the first women's rights convention. It advertised itself as "a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman". Held in the Wesleyan Chapel of the town of Seneca Falls, New York, it spanned two days over July 19–20, 1848. This connects with 4.2 because of this it became a part of American culture.
  • Oneida Community

    Oneida Community
    The Oneida Community was a perfectionist religious communal society founded by John Humphrey Noyes in 1848 in Oneida, New York. ... The Oneida Community practiced communalism (in the sense of communal property and possessions), complex marriage, male sexual continence, and mutual criticism. This connects with 4.1 because soon enough it became important for the government.
  • American Renaissance

    American Renaissance
    Period of time during which American authors explored the meaning of " American. This connects with 4.2 because it was something that defined American culture back then and now.
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    Second Great Awakening

    The Second Great Awakening was a Protestant religious revival during the early 19th century in the United States. The movement began around 1790, gained momentum by 1800 and, after 1820, membership rose rapidly among Baptist and Methodist congregations whose preachers led the movement. This connects with 4.1 because it has to deal with our government
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    President Thomas Jefferson

    President from 1801-1809
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    Barbary Pirates

    The bribery pirates were a group of pirates who was seizing American merchant ships and holding the crews for ransom, demanding the U.S. pay tribute to the Barbary rulers. President Thomas Jefferson refused to pay this tribute. That means that this occurred during Thomas Jefferson's presidency. This connects with 4.3 because the US wanted to make trades with other countries but because of the pirates it made it harder to trade with other countries across the sea.
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    James Madison

    The president from 1809-1817
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    Era Of Good Feelings

    The Era of Good Feelings marked a period in the political history of the United States that reflected a sense of national purpose and a desire for unity among Americans in the aftermath of the War of 1812. This connects with 4.1 because it's forming s better government.
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    James Monroe

    President from 1817-1825
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    John Quincy Adams

    President from 1825-1829
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    Andrew Jackson

    President form 1829-1837
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    Martin Van Buren

    President from 1837 to 1841.
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    William Henry Garrison Whig

    President from March of 1841 to April of 1841
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    John Tyler Whig

    President from 1841 to 1845.
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    James K. Poll

    President from 1845 to 1849