Origins and Growth of After School Programs

Timeline created by Alexys220
In History
  • 1852 Change in Child Labor Laws

    1852 Change in Child Labor Laws
    During the late 1800's there was a change in child labor laws. Children were not allowed to be part of the workforce.During this time their was increased support for child education.
  • First Youth Boys Clubs

    First Youth Boys Clubs
    During the late 1800's the first youth boy clubs were being created. The boys club was the transition from child labor to being enrolled in clubs to provide care and improve education
  • Changes in Family Labor Force

    Changes in Family Labor Force
    The family dynamic changed when women entered the labor force during World War I. Women entering the workforce left children unattended. The need for after school program was necessary.
  • Changes in American Neighborhoods

    Changes in American Neighborhoods
    An increase in violence during the 1960's made parents and the nation concerned about their child's safety. There was an increase in violence between the hours of 3:00 to 6:00 PM. Child care was necessary for this time frame.
  • First White House Conference on Children and Youth

    First White House Conference on Children and Youth
    The political view at the time was changing people believed that the government should help support working mothers and small children. The conservatives, however, believe child care is a family problem and the government should not intervene. President Nixon was the chair for White House Conference on children and youth. He had very conservative point of view.
  • First National Report on the Quality of Childcare

    First National Report on the Quality of Childcare
    The report “Windows on Daycare” was the first national report that focused on the quality of child care. The report was created by the National Council of Jewish Women. The report focused on changes need to improve the after-school program.
  • Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971

    Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971
    The act also called Mondale-Brademas Bill provided the after-school program with $2 billion dollars in funding. The policy stated by legislation insured quality care for children of socioeconomic status. The bill encouraged support to create better programs. The bill was eventually vetoed by President Nixon.
  • Self Care: First Congressional Children Caucus

    Self Care: First Congressional Children Caucus
    A political study created for the latchkey issue. The issue suggested how children staying at home providing self-care was unhealthy. The need for government involvement by came necessary to support after school programs.
  • Congressional Children's Caucus

    Congressional Children's Caucus
    After the comprehensive development act was vetoed Senator Dodd ran the first Congressional Children’s Caucus in 1983. The senator focused on the latchkey children and the negative impact it was having on children. The Caucus promoted the provision of adult-supervision.
  • After School Spotlight

    After School Spotlight
    Politically not enough change was being made to make a difference for after-school programs. The senator Bruce Babbit a Democrat from Arizona was again demonstrating the necessity for after-school programs, he had created attainable goals. Babbit was running for President and hoped to execute these changes but, this never occurred. He was a part of the Clinton administration.
  • Child Care Development and Block Grant.

    Child Care Development and Block Grant.
    Great progress was made with the Child Care Development and Block Grant. The grant was the first on a federal level that provided in school care to low-income households and people believing public assistance. The funds distributed could be used for any child care.
  • 21CCLCs

    21CCLCs
    The 21st Century Community Learning Centers is a federal fund that was created to support local afterschool, before-school and summer learning programs. The program experienced changes in 2015 as part of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Each state receives specific funds for low income students.
  • National Survey of American Families

    National Survey of American Families
    The after-school program was being surveyed on a national level. The survey recorded the increase in children in the after-school program. According to the survey approximately, 6.7 million children between the ages of 6-to-12 were enrolled in the after-school program.
  • School's Legislation Changes

    School's Legislation Changes
    From the years of 1994 to 1998 there was an increase in funding due to America’s Schools Act and ESEA. Federal funding for the 21CCLCs increased and then funding shifted because of the Leave No Child Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001. The funds were being moved from Federal to State the level. There were also certain requirements that the program needed to meet to attain funds and improve the program.
  • House of Representatives grants $100 Milllion

    House of Representatives grants $100 Milllion
    Recently the government was able to pass a bill that funds after-school programs. The house of representatives voted to pass the bill and granted $100 billion dollars specifically to fund after-school programs.
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    Origin and Growth of After School Program

    The expansion and progress of after school over time.